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  • choosing wood

    I have no experience choosing wood for a project. My project is a rocking horse by Wooden Memories (Krackles). I told my lumber counter I needed a clear wood with a low moisture content. Quantity is around 46 sq. feet. The estimate I was provided was for doug fir for just under $300.
    I did not expect that number. Is this average? Am I not asking for the correct type of wood? The project will be painted. The lines of the project do require some shaping. Thank you for your help in this matter.

  • #2
    Re: choosing wood

    sounds awful high to me! and why doug fir, how big is the walking horse? I assume it will be painted so you could mix woods if you wanted, say pine for the straight stock and maybe basswood for parts you want to carve if you carve any...don't know but that seems out of line for price...bet you could go to some job sites close to you where they are building a house and get cut offs they are going to toss for just picking them up...ask the job super...they usually are happy for someone to take the stuff and they don't have to pay someone to pick it up and haul if off...just a thought! :

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    • #3
      Re: choosing wood

      46 sq. ft or 46 bd ft??? If Sq. ft., how thick is the stock. From the information given, neither quantity works out. 46 bd ft. comes closest at about $6 a bd ft. which for clear lumber may not be to bad in your area, although in a large quantity you should be able to get it cheaper. Also, don't think I'd be using douglas fir. Think I'd use pine and forgo the clear part which will save money. By strategically placing the knots it should work fine. Give them a good coat of shellac before painting to keep the from bleeding through.

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      • #4
        Re: choosing wood

        I would look into poular. It is a good wood to work with, no knots and it accepts paint real well. Runs close to pine prices unless you are using #3 or #4 which is used for pallets. and has a lot of knots.
        John T.

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        • #5
          John T.

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          • #6
            Re: choosing wood

            Thank you so much for your replies. All of them have been helpful. The area I live in is rural . This limits my access to wood supply. The thickness of the wood required is 2' and 1'; widths are from 10' to 4'. I agree about the wood not needing to be clear (with strategic placement of the pattern) I do have a concern about moisture content because the assembly requires the pieces to be fitted together somewhat puzzle -like and 'pegged' I tried to enclose a picture but I can't figure out how .

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            • #7
              Re: choosing wood

              The previous message is from 'dentzellover' (Cathy Lehman)

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              • #8
                Re: choosing wood

                Cathy..if you want to post a picture...go to www.picturetrail.com member name will be asked for and type in carvers-r-us then when the password blank comes up put carve thats it! you will have to poke around to see how to post a picture, but it isn't too bad...I will let others more computer literate explain that part! :

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                • #9
                  Re: choosing wood

                  I went to the local lumber yard. Asked the guy if he had 2x4, 4x4, and 6x6. He told me,'We don't sell lumber here. Good Bye.' Now isn't that astonishing?!! I have bougth lumber there since the '70's'.
                  I went to Lowe's. Their 2x4 are full of knots and cost $1.50 each. The poplar is $3.79 each. Too much for me. I went out and split a maple log and bandsawed my own lumber. I was just using it for carving so I did not need it 'dimensioned' thru a planer. A lot cheaper than buying wood if you have access to some nice firewood. By splitting the log into squares the grain is mostly straight, not like the bought wood that is cut to size and has knots and crooked grain in it.
                  Have fun with your food, eat with your fingers!

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                  • #10
                    Re: choosing wood

                    Dart you make it sound so easy. How many people can go out cut a maple tree down saw it let it dry and use it. Sounds to me at 3.50 is a lot cheaper than your way. How much do they charge for the emergency room visit these days? My opinion!!!
                    John T.

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                    • #11
                      Re: choosing wood

                      Cutting and splitting wood is not easy and not everyone can do it. But just for me, that's what I do to save money and end up with a good piece of wood. For me, why burn a good piece of wood when I can make something from it? As far as safety goes, I use wedges and sledge hammer. Take it slow and use gloves, glasses, and make sure I know what I am doing. I used to cut trees a lot with a chainsaw. Never got cut by the chainsaw as I was always careful with it. I enjoy cutting with the chainsaw and spitting wood too. I didn't mean to advocate that eveyone should do what I do to get wood. Sorry, I appologize for the confusion. Jim
                      Have fun with your food, eat with your fingers!

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