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Rose pattern from Fall issue

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  • leehljp
    replied
    That is beautifully done. I agree with the way that Rolf described it too!

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  • Rolf
    replied
    Beautiful ! The wood selection and shaping really pop. I think I like this color on the rose better than the darker red. It shows the shaping much better.
    Last edited by Rolf; 08-12-2019, 07:57 AM.

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  • meflick
    replied
    Looks beautiful Jo. Awesome job. Thanks for showing.
    Last edited by meflick; 08-12-2019, 10:41 AM.

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  • Jo Labre
    replied
    First coat of finish - Minwax wipe on poly.
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    This gallery has 1 photos.

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  • Rolf
    replied
    hank I hope things settle enough that you can slip in an hour or two once in a while. Scrolling is great therapy.

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  • jttheclockman
    replied
    Well good luck Hank. I too know about caring for parents. My Mom passed 3 years ago at 92 and she too had Dimentia. Dad passed 13 years ago and he had everything and boy I felt so sorry for him. But he was my mentor and teacher and I have alot of the knowledge I have today from things he taught me over the years. Miss them both. Scrolling is fun and just another hobby. Combine the pen turning with scrolling and you have something. Well see you around the scrolling sites.

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  • leehljp
    replied
    John,
    I did scroll sawing some early on when I was in Japan from around '89 - mid 90's with a cheap pin-blade saw. Then 4 years ago, LOML bought me a DeWalt. I have done a few things - mostly with grandchildren and for one daughter who likes scroll saw work - fret and Christmas ornaments.

    I am not where I want to be with scroll sawing yet. I had a full set of tools when in Japan and brought them back with me. My dad left me a shop full of tools, so when I returned in Dec of 2010, and my "stuff" arrived in Jan of 2011, I had so much "stuff" that I could not move around and do any work. I gradually got rid of (to two son in-laws) two table saws, a bench top drill press, a 12" sliding miter saw, a lathe and a lot more. Then I had to work on the shop due to termites. A couple of years ago, I put my contractors saw and 12" sliding miter saw on foldable saw stands so that I could move them outside to have room to work.

    I have been saying that I would be able to make anything by this summer, but that doesn't look like it going to happen. At least I have my shop with AC and heater so that I can go into it year round. Currently I am helping LOML take care of her 91 year old mother who has dementia onset - and that is a 24 hour job. There is always something that holds me back.

    My scroll saw ambitions are intarsia and bowls. Haven't started but I did enjoy a taste of that when I was in Japan with the old pin blade saw. I didn't know what it was called back then, I did a cross between segmenting and puzzles in addition to flower profiles.

    I often visualize in my mind, think on it for a year or two or three - imagining every cut and size- then go make it from memory with minimal notes. I have done book cases, tables, router tables, work tables and the like. I just have to get my shop tools ready so that I can get in and out without tripping over excess tools. The only thing I can get to easily are my two lathes and two shop size tool boxes - and the saws on wheeled stands.
    Last edited by leehljp; 08-08-2019, 12:12 PM.

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  • jttheclockman
    replied
    Hank, I did not know you are taking up scroll sawing>> What saw do you have?? What type of scrolling are you interested in?? Any help needed you know where to find me.

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  • leehljp
    replied
    Originally posted by Rolf View Post
    Hank Jo Labre's rose is Intarsia she used natural wood colors and grain direction.

    The rose in the article is segmentation. On page 38 you can see the pattern on the wood. All of the grain goes in the same direction. then shaped and stained or painted.
    Thanks Rolf; I was reading it wrong. That other language warped my mind! You know - East is east and West is west; And never the twain shall meet! Where they do meet in the mind, there is chaos!

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  • Sandy Oaks
    replied
    That is sure beautiful, Jo.

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  • Rolf
    replied
    Hank Jo Labre's rose is Intarsia she used natural wood colors and grain direction.

    The rose in the article is segmentation. On page 38 you can see the pattern on the wood. All of the grain goes in the same direction. then shaped and stained or painted.
    Last edited by Rolf; 08-07-2019, 07:51 AM.

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  • leehljp
    replied
    Originally posted by Rolf View Post
    Scott I call that shaped segmentation. It has its place. I will post what I am doing as a new post so as not to hijack this one.
    I'm still learning here. As I looked at the rose, it looked like that for different parts of the rose, the grain was running in different directions. That is what I thought intarsia was. Maybe it is not true intarsia because it is not from a reddish wood?

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  • Jo Labre
    replied
    I have the rose shaped. Tomorrow I put the first coat of finish on the pieces. I haven't decided if I will put a solid backer on it or will do an openwork backer like the original pattern.
    You do not have permission to view this gallery.
    This gallery has 1 photos.

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  • meflick
    replied
    Looking great Jo. I copied the pattern out of the magazine (along with several others from this edition.) But that is as far as I have gotten with it so far. Thanks for sharing.

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  • Rolf
    replied
    Scott I call that shaped segmentation. It has its place. I will post what I am doing as a new post so as not to hijack this one.

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