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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Painting supplies

    Woodcarving Illustrated just had a good article on JansenArt Acrylic Paints. It talks about blending and colors, etc.
    Jim

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Painting supplies

    Johno - The answer to your question is Yes. Some folks seal and some folks don't. Then, some spritz the carving with water before painting. Sooo - I guess there's nothing left to do, except get some scrap and try them all to see what you like.

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  • Johno
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    Re: Painting supplies

    I am a new member, and i must say this site is great reading and very informative .

    I have not done much painting up to this point but would like to start. When you use acrylics, do you seal the wood first or just paint directly on the wood. I have read about using a thin wash but how do you keep it from showing darker on the end grain?

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Painting supplies

    Hello Paul,
    I've been to the Branson Rendezvous several times and I've had John Engler's carving/watercolor painting class. He does some awesome carving work and what you learn in his painting class is priceless.

    You mentioned the need to let one color dry before painting the adjoining color. A few seconds use of a hair dryer will greatly speed the process.

    Donna T

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  • richy-ruff
    replied
    Re: Painting supplies

    In many of the relief carvings I have done in the past I have used various colors of wood stain on the same carving. This allows the natural wood grain to stand out yet adds character and detail to your carving. This process gives an almost Intarsia look to the finished product.

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  • Paul_Guraedy
    replied
    Re: Painting supplies

    The method that I use for watercolor painting was learned from John Engler (relief carver/painter from Springfield, MO). I liked the transparency of the paint and the fact that the final color is developed through the use of several washes. I think this gives much greater final color control than does acrylics.

    I do not use a sealer prior to painting. Large areas are always wet down before laying on color and painted 'wet on wet.' Before it dries, I start to blend in other colors (I seldom paint with definite lines. Should they be needed, I either make sure the paint is thick or outline the area with a burning pen. Try to just make an impression and not burn the wood; but, if you do just make sure paint gets into the groove and covers it up. In areas of definite lines do not wet down the wood prior to painting. This will help control the area of the paint.

    The big problem with watercolor is that areas of adjacent color need to dry before painting next to them. This makes painting a slow process. Also, the carving must be held as flat as possible while painting.

    I enjoy doing relief carvings (buildings and wildlife); but, my real interest is birds of prey in the round. I believe that the 'softer' look of watercolors does a better job than acrylics. Once finished, I use several (5-6) light coats of Krylon to protect the carving.

    I am experimenting with oil paints. I like some of the effects; but, believe that carvings painted with oils depend more on the paint and less on carving than do watercolors or acrylics.

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  • BasketballJones
    replied
    Re: Painting supplies

    Paul,
    What brand sealer, or type of finnish do you recommend for water colors to prevent running?

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  • Paul_Guraedy
    replied
    Re: Painting supplies

    Just returned from the Woodcarving Rendezvous (Branson, MO) and was looking over the messages. Came to this one and received some good information. But, also noticed that two on-line suppliers were not listed. Cheap Joe's and Daniel Smith. I would suggest getting a printed catalog from each. They are both reputable suppliers of a wide variety of artist's materials.

    I am a firm believer that 'you get what you pay for.' Cheap tools create unhappy carvers. Cheap paints create unhappy results with most of us carvers. I have talked to a number of good wood carving painters and flat artists. Brand names have been stressed by all of them.

    If you think there is not a difference try getting the same color in several different brand names and comparing them.

    I started with acrylics (still do some figures in this medium). Most of my carvings are now done in water color and I have found that sticking with the brands recommended by artists (all be it the more expensive) has paid off in more predictable results and better painting.

    Paul Guraedy
    Whooping Hollow Woods
    Alpena, ARkansas

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Painting supplies

    experiment....try the smallest bit of silver into the black, if thats not what you want, try even less white...and so forth!

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  • richy-ruff
    replied
    Re: Painting supplies

    OK one more question.....how would you go about mixing a Charcoal Black color. It's for a black bear. Thanks.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Painting supplies

    : Hey Ric,

    Another good source of art supplies, woodcarving and woodburning supplies is Christian J Hummul they are out of Pa, I believe. www.christian j hummul.com phone no. is 1-800-762-0235 they also will give you a free catalog and put you on their mailing list if you like.

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  • richy-ruff
    replied
    Re: Painting supplies

    Thanks for the tips. I did find the following supplier and they have a very good color chart that's worth looking at when planning the paint job.

    http://store.crafta.com/yhst-1638910...lic-paint.html

    Thanks again....Ric

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  • oldbearx2
    replied
    Re: Painting supplies

    Hey all I too use the taxidermy supply houses for my airbrush paints. Both Van Dykes and Wasco give good service and the prices are ok. They do sell both water and slovent based paints. I use the water based for safety reasons. If you airbrush and use the solvent based make sure you have the right ventilation system, (sealed motor) so there is no chance of explosion. For my acrylics I use Delta paints from Hobby Lobby or whatever place sells them. have fun, carve old bearx2

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