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  • UV protection

    This may be a "Here we go again -" question.

    We all know that, after a few years in the light, wood changes, usually for the darker. I've spent years trying to figure out how to keep red bloodwood from turning dark purple/black and eastern red cedar from turning brown. And I know it isn't just the UV light that causes the change.

    In some ways, I've guessed right. The light red yellow pine heartwood, used on my tiger, has turned a nice reddish tan, which works perfectly.

    Anyway - I was talking to a couple of artists, at the gallery, and they mentioned they used this product -- "Lascaux UV Protect Spray Varnish" to some success. Has anyone here heard of it or used it? I've done the google on it and it seems to be popular among artists, but I'm wondering if anyone has tried it on bare wood.

    I know Krylon has "UV Resistant" sprays in the big box stores, but I'm looking for something a little more definitive.

    I'm also open to other suggestions.
    Tony

    My Son-in-law said "Darnit, I cut this board twice, now. And it's still too short."

  • #2
    I have read ....somewhere.... that if you buy a paint with high UV protection and do not let them add the coloring, it will work with this issue and come out clear. It goes on white but dries clear. I have used this but I have no experience with the color changing issue because I sell everything I make.
    Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,
    No PHD, but I have my GED and my DD 214"
    Website https://craftingcouple.com/

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    • #3
      I have use Krylon UV-Resistant Clear over some painted whirligigs.. Seems good so far,.. I used gloss..
      Made a outdoor sign out of Cherry.. Tried the gloss.. YUCK (my view).. overcoated with Matte. Won't know if it works for years..
      The other John A. Nelson
      johnsworkshop.com
      sigpic
      I just follow the lines and make sawdust
      on a Seyco ST-21 and a Yellow DW788

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      • #4
        I've done some research on this. The compounds that block the UV rays break down over time and you need to reapply it periodically to renew that protection.

        We've got an article coming up where I made two sample boards using the same finishes in three rows (acrylic paint-thinned, acrylic paint undiluted, oil paint thinned, oil paint undiluted, stain, danish oil, and a few other finishes). On one row, I applied the highest-rated spar varnish I could find (Epiphanes, highly recommended by Fine Wood Woodworking), Deft, and finally no finish. One board is in my office window. The other is turned upside down in a dark corner of our shop. After a few months, I'll take some comparison shots.

        Bob
        www.WoodCarvingIllustrated.com
        www.FoxChapelPublishing.com
        www.ScrollSawer.com

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        • #5
          That should be a great test, Bob.
          Denny
          ArtCrafters in Dayton, TN

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          • #6
            And as I was writing, I realized that another fun test would be to take a wood that changes color dramatically (padauk, purpleheart, or something similar). Take one piece and just set it in the window, and another chunk in a dark place. Then, use one of those vacuum sealers for foot and vacuum seal two pieces in bags--one for the window and one for the dark. Finally, take two pieces and totally coat them with multiple coats of varnish or even an epoxy bar-top finish--one for the window and one for the dark.

            This would test the differences in how these colorful woods change based on simple exposure to oxygen (oxidation) vs UV exposure depending on how it's finished.

            Bob
            www.WoodCarvingIllustrated.com
            www.FoxChapelPublishing.com
            www.ScrollSawer.com

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            • #7
              Remember even artificial light gives off UV. The amounts are smaller then natural sun light but we are talking about an accumulated effect. The exception is LED lighting which gives off no UV.
              Scott
              Creator of fine designer sawdust.

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              • #8
                I believe Judy Gale Roberts is also on the hunt for the perfect finish with some experimentation on her own. It would be great to combine every ones test results. Regarding indoor lighting fluorescent lights are the worst at least from my experience.
                Rolf
                RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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                • #9
                  Bob hit on something I hadn't thought about - Oxidation. It isn't just the light that changes the wood.

                  I didn't think about sealing the wood completely, and I do not seal the pieces I make. Even with the oil & poly applied, it is still a variable medium - reacting to the air and moisture of it's environment. Not sure how that affects the color of the wood, though.

                  Tony

                  My Son-in-law said "Darnit, I cut this board twice, now. And it's still too short."

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                  • #10
                    Woodworkers Source (last week) posted an article on keeping African Padauk's gorgeous color from turning dark. It's an interesting read. I haven't tried it yet, and would be interested in long term results. It's such a chemistry experiment since every wood reacts differently to oils, wax, poly, urethene, varnish, laquer, UV, oxygen, moisture, heat, cold, and so many other factors. And every time a manufacturer changes their formula for their reason or for a new governmental regulation, that effects things too. But there's always going to be a few of our experiments that provide improvements. I look forward to continued results from everyone's testing in our wood world!
                    Linda at www.ArtIngrained.com

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                    • #11
                      Linda - do you have the URL of the posting? I've looked on their website and can't find anything.

                      Thanks

                      Never mind - I found it - Very Interesting -- https://www.woodworkerssource.com/bl...rve-the-color/
                      Last edited by tgiro01; 05-23-2018, 09:22 PM.
                      Tony

                      My Son-in-law said "Darnit, I cut this board twice, now. And it's still too short."

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                      • #12
                        That's the link on Woodworker Source's website for their current regular article, which is interesting.
                        But they did another and more specific take on it in an subscriber email I receive regularly.
                        It starts out:
                        "We Cracked The Code

                        A Winning Finish For Padauk

                        We did the test, this finish holds the color the longest"

                        And then goes on with one specific method.
                        Since it's an email, it has no URL link.
                        I didn't copy the entire thing here, because I'm not sure about permissions need to do that.
                        However, I can forward the email to anyone interested.
                        Just let me know what email address you want me to use.

                        Linda at www.ArtIngrained.com

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                        • #13
                          Thanks Linda, looks good for a try.
                          ♥♥ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♥♥

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