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  • dip finish

    I am looking for pointers on how to dip polyurethane on wood projects. What kind of polyurthane is best? such as oil based compared to water based? do you thin the poly 50%?
    is there any brushing or wiping involved? how may coats? thanks for any help dan in Pa

  • #2

    I have used several things for dipping. I have used Boiled Linseed Oil, Mineral Oil, Polyurethane, etc. When using Boiled Linseed Oil or Poly I mixed then 50/05 with mineral spirits. I have even used equal parts of Poly, BLO, and MS. That was mostly in the past. I now use Defoil or Danish Oil which are really mixes of all the above. As far has how many coat goes normally I only do one. If I want more sheen I would spray with Poly or Lacquer from a can.



    Last edited by NC Scroller; 04-07-2017, 02:21 PM.
    Scott
    Creator of fine designer sawdust.

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    • #3
      I would not recommend trying to dip polyurethane. It really isn't as conducive to dipping as straight oil (like BLO) or a Danish oil. Dipping works best with products that are designed to soak into the wood as opposed to building up a film coating on the surface like poly.
      Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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      • #4
        So then, danish oil is very different than plain blo? makes a better finish? more like polyurthane? so is polyurthane a lacquer? I am trying to learn a little about the difference in finishes? dan in Pa

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        • #5
          Bob Flexner has a terrific book on finishing. In his oil finish chapter, he shows how misleading product labeling is. Some products labeled tung oil do not contain tung oil, for example. Some oils are really more thinned polyurethane than oil, like Waterlox. Danish oil is an oil-varnish blend.

          Polyurethane cures. Shellac and lacquer are drying finishes, which makes them easier to remove. Thinned shellac is also known as sanding sealer. It's probably the best seal coat around. Pays to buy the flakes and mix them with denatured alcohol to the cut you need, since it works best when it's fresh.

          There's a lot to learn, and it's easy to think you know what you're using when you don't. I've had some bad surprises along the way, so I know this first hand, unfortunately.

          And if you try to oil teak, you're in for some bad surprises.
          Carole

          Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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          • #6
            Dipping - I know of about a hand full of people in the pen turning world who use "dipping" (or did use dipping) and are/were very good at it. It works in some situations, but it takes practice and knowing your finishes along with the ambient temperature and humidity. Most dipping was with lacquer (IIRC) and another home made finish, but it was done with some poly and other. This is for small piece situations, takes time, patience and either a steady hand or system. Some were quite good at it.
            Hank Lee
            Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dwssr2 View Post
              So then, danish oil is very different than plain blo? makes a better finish? more like polyurthane? so is polyurthane a lacquer? I am trying to learn a little about the difference in finishes? dan in Pa
              Danish oil is typically a blend, in approximately equal proportions, of oil, thinner and oil based varnish (could be oil based polyurethane, because polyurethane is simply a varnish that uses urethane resin instead of an alkyd or phenolic resin). You can literally make your own, using mineral spirits, your favorite varnish/poly and boiled linseed oil. It's nothing magical and if you already have these ingredients on hand, it can be cheaper.

              Since Danish oil has a little varnish in it, it does have some of the film finish properties of the varnish, meaning it will offer a little protection from abrasion and moisture. Plain BLO is not really a finish, per se. It is a straight oil, with some drying agents added, which allow it to cure, but it doesn't build up like a film finish. It absorbs into the wood and provides a low luster and darkens the wood with an amber tint. It is primarily a colorant. As a finish, Danish oil is better and can be used as a stand alone finish.

              Solvent based polyurethane and lacquer are very different. They cure differently. Polyurethane cures by exposure to oxygen and lacquer cures by the evaporation of it's solvent.

              Carole's recommendation of Flexner's book on finishing is an excellent one. I also recommend Jeff Jewitt's Complete Illustrated Guide to Finishing. Either book would be a great resource for learning about finishes and having both is even better.
              Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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              • #8
                thanks for the replies, so how do you wipe stain from small nooks and crannies, like small puzzle pieces.

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                • #9
                  I use compressed air. For fretwork, I usually apply the stain with a brush, so I can work it into the nooks & crannies, without getting too much on. Then I lay the piece on a rag or paper towels and take the air nozzle, blowing out the excess. Keep wiping it down to ensure you don't get any runs or blotching and go over it with the air nozzle a couple times. It is a little messy, but if you don't saturate the piece with too much stain and keep the drippings confined to the rag/paper towels, it isn't bad.
                  Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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                  • #10
                    I have made small cedar items like drink coasters by the hundreds so I thought to dip them. I thinned, oil based, poly about 10% with naphtha. I dipped the coasters and then wiped them with a soft rag to avoid drips forming on the undersides. Two coats did the job. If I wanted higher gloss I sprayed a poly finish (from a rattle can) on the top of the coasters.
                    Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,15" Jet
                    You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214""

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