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  • Boiled Linseed Oil

    I just got done putting the finishing touches on the paint on some carvings I'd done this fall and winter.My question is this.Does anyone know of anything other than Boiled Linseed Oil to put on them for the final coating?To me that stuff smells so bad I can't use it in my 8x12 studio in the house without it stinking up everything.Thanks in advance,for your answers, because by reading your posts and answers I know that their are some smart carvers and whittlers on here. Any and all answers would be greatly appreciated.
    Lance Brooks


    To GOD be the Glory,Amen.

  • #2
    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil

    I haven't tried it, but I understand that Dave Sabol sometimes uses regular motor oil. Since I paint with acrylics I cannot verify how well this works, but it sounds like the paint would never completely dry.

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    • #3
      Re: Boiled Linseed Oil

      I usually use a paste wax. I put it on with an old tooth brush then buff it with a soft bristled paint brush.

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      • #4
        Re: Boiled Linseed Oil

        I sometimes use Deft semi- gloss, can't find the satin finish anymore. I really like the antique wax by Enviroment Friendly. It's water based, and doesn't put alot of shine on the wood.

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        • #5
          Re: Boiled Linseed Oil

          I used boiled Linseed Oil on a few walking sticks that i made and it didn't seem to stink too bad, but everyone's nose works different. My wife thinks mine don't work too well anyhow! One problem with the BLO is that is has to be re-applied every so often to maintain the protection. There is a Danish Oil (which I have never used) that may not smell as bad, but it also need to be periodically re-applied. I use the Deft satin finish spray, but is smell very strong and shouldn't be applied outside in damp or cold weather. The wax sounds like the safest and least smelly finish to use indoors. I found it hard to get good coverage in the detail of my carvings with it and you have to watch out for build up in the cracks. Maybe one of the spray waxes would be the answer? They don't smell bad and they should bring out the grain in the wood.

          Good Luck ...

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          • #6
            Re: Boiled Linseed Oil

            lBoiled Linseed Oil----I use this stuff as a filler after finishing cutting. Following that I paint with water sol. paints (cause it is easier to clean up) Lilnseed Oil and burnt umbr make a very good antiqueing solution. I have used it for years and find it easier to use than anything else I have used. One caution Linseed oil and burnt umber on raw wood will really go to work and darkent the wood a great deal. Over the filler and paint it just gives the carving a dull -- older look and I think a much better look. I do not like high gloss on my work. Applying this mixture takes some experience, so expermint.

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            • #7
              Re: Boiled Linseed Oil

              Speaking of Wax-----Have you ever tried shoe polish???
              I tried some Kiwa (? I think that is correct.) in neutral and tan over a linseed oil filler. It is very good and was suggessted by a good friend of mine. Try it you might like it. The neutral would work over paint. cheers

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              • #8
                Re: Boiled Linseed Oil

                I've always liked the aroma of boiled linseed oil. I dunk my painted Santas in it and it 'antiques' them real nice.

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                • #9
                  Re: Boiled Linseed Oil

                  :Pineyknow----when you dunk your painted pieces in the linseed oil is it pure----you haven't added anything to the oil.
                  I use burnt umber mixed with linseed oil for antiqueing and that also works fine. charlie

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                  • #10
                    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil

                    I guess I should have added that I use aan acrylic burnt umber wash really dilute it and build with several washes before dunking.

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                    • #11

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                      • #12
                        Re: Boiled Linseed Oil

                        I like to use acrilics with a hair dryer, old kind with a hose on the wood and try and paint two or more projects at a time so some surface drying can occure. I only use linseed oil if the item has to sit outside. Found that Krylon Matte Finish or other brands keeps water or acrilic paint from rubbing off when handeled. The matte is all you need to put on for a good skin tone on unpainted faces and hands for many woods especially birch, pine that darken on there own when let set in air. Doing smelly finishing after Painting in the room that has a vent fan or putting a fan in the window sucking air out helps. I have also use the water based polyurithane satin varnishes on projects, sometimes a very fine sanding will dull any gloss even more when very dry, two or three days later.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Boiled Linseed Oil



                          Makenchips (hope I spelled that right) I can't tell you the ratio of linseed oil to burnt umber. I just ssqueeze out of bit of burnt umber and mix WELL and test on a piece of cut up wood (slashes, deep cuts, etc.) to see how it darkens and takes to the cuts and or low surfaces. The burnt umber I use is for oil paints from a art supply source. A friend of mine keeps large jar of mixed linseed and umber mixed and when he is ready he just dunke his carving in the mixture. I might add that when applying this mixture I reall slopp it on and give it a few minutes to work. If it is not dark enough, slopp on some more. Hope this answers some of your thoughts. charlie

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                          • #14
                            Re: Boiled Linseed Oil

                            I'm with Pineyknott, love the smell of linseed oil. I don't know if it is harmful or not, but since it isn't petroleum based, you would think it would be like a natural product. But that smell does stay with the wood awhile. Good if you like it bad if you don't.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Boiled Linseed Oil

                              Pineynot, you mix acrylic burnt umber with boiled linseed oil? I thought you had to use the oil-based burnt umber with linseed oil !? Does the acrylic paint mix well and stay mixed? Well, blow my dress up, if that works, it's a lot more convenient, and cheaper, than using oil paints!

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