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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Re: air brush paint

    Just thought you all would like to know that you can buy attachments to use other propellants.
    One of the most popular is CO2. It can be bought at a nearby welding shop. It is fairly cheap and last for a long time. The best part is it is quiet.
    Little canisters of air can be purchased at a craft or hobby store. Even K-mart and Wal-mart have them in the model section. These may last you through one or two projects.
    The oddest and rarely used item is inflated tire tubes. The only good use for these are when you are camping and need an environmentally friendly way to paint.
    By the way double action airbrush is the way to go. A little longer to practice, but allows for very fine and accurate paint coverage.

    Brad

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Re: air brush paint

    I use windex and distilled water to clean my airbrush.Windex is a hell of a lot cheaper than commercial airbrush cleaner,especially up here in Canada.The distilled water doesnt
    have all the metals and chemicals that gum up the airbrush.And I use Liquitex Acrylic Medium Viscosity paint which is made for airbrushes.But keep it thin and use an airbrush medium to thin it or use a combination of medium & distilled water. The airbrush i use is an Iwata Eclipse Bcs which is under 140 dollars in Canada,probably half that price in the States.I bought my compressor at Home Depot.Its got a 1.5 horse motor and a 3gallon tank all you really need for airbrushing. I hope this helps. Practice,practice practice.

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Re: air brush paint

    check out WASCO on the net they have some xcellent airbrush ready paints. The paints are all ready thinned to paint but still need to be strained.

    Leave a comment:


  • woodenleg
    replied
    Re: air brush paint

    I hate to even bring these two ideas up but:

    I have a very tight friend (his description) who uses regular Home Depot water-based house paint in his air brush. For a compressor, he uses the small can of air.

    I figure this will either get a load of comments or no comments at all. ???

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Re: air brush paint

    I bought 'Chroma' paint for the airbrush, it is designed for airbrush and was recommended to me by a national award winning bird carver......but alas..haven't tried it yet!

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  • Guest
    Guest replied

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  • AlArchie
    Guest replied
    Re: air brush paint

    Donna, can you put up some pics of your fish?


    al

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  • Guest
    Guest replied

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  • AlArchie
    Guest replied
    Re: air brush paint

    Dave, if you are using acrylics, you don't have to worry about vapor inhalation, but it is not a good idea to breathe the airborne paint, so a mask is in order. I use a hooded vent that filters the air and returns it to the shop, and also have a ventilating duct to the outside. I'd really be concerned with using lacquer or enamel based paints without a LOT of ventilation capacity, and maybe even a respirator made for fumes (one with a carbon cannister).

    As far as compressors go I use two, one is a big 2 cylinder 1 hp garage style with a 20 gal tank. It has a pressure regulator on it that can be set from 0 to 150 PSI. The other is one of these little vibrator types from Campbell Hausfield. Picked it up for about 80 bucks and it works great. It also has a presure regulator on it, but because it is tankless and noisy, I have wired a remote switch to it so I can turn it on and off from my bench. You can buy these compressors dedicated to airbrushing, but they are a bit more pricey and if you use it only for personal use, and not professionally, they are a good way to go. Either way, make sure you get to the auto supply store and pick up a dryer filter, so you don't get a lot of condensation in the air supply. There are two kinds, and I use both. first the mechanical separator bowl, that collects water and oil residue, and finally an in-line chemical dryer. these are cheap and replaceable when the medium turns a bluish green color. differnet brands may have different color indicators.

    The big compresor runs extremely noisy, but due to the big tank, it only kicks on once every 10 to 15 minutes, while I'm using it. with a 50 foot supply hose, it sits across the basement from me so it doesn't startle the heck out of me when it kicks on.

    check you hardware stores and you should be able to find one of these for between 150 and 400 dollars. Or check the art supplies for special airbrush units, they are quite, smooth and dependable. Oh, ya, did I mention EXPENSIVE!

    Al

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Re: air brush paint

    Thanks for the reply on if airbrushes are worth the trouble.
    What size of compressor should I start with? Most things I read say 20psi but some require higher.
    Can I use an airbrush in my enclosed basement? What about the fumes.

    Thanks
    Dave K

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  • Bandaid
    replied
    Re: air brush paint

    I read an article some time ago where the author suggested using Windex to thin acrylic paints for use in airbrushes. I don't have a brush but was curious if any of you tried this or have any comments. I wonder what the effect would be if it was used in conventional painting. ???

    Leave a comment:


  • AlArchie
    Guest replied
    Re: air brush paint

    Also, when you're done with one color, run a cup of plain water mixed with a drop of dishwashing solution through the thing. This will break up any dried on acrylic. Then a cup (paint cup) of plain water. Pull the nozzle and check for build up on the needle. If there is any, carefully wipe it with a soft cloth to remove the residue. This will keep ya paintin and not cussin! there is also a lubricating solution available that I run through before I put it away. WD-40 works as well, but make sure ya run some dishwashing solution through before painting the next time.

    Al

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  • FatEddy
    replied
    Re: air brush paint

    Now I know why I can't airbrush xxx been thinning with water and haven't been straining xxx double stupid xxx time to dig the ol pasch out of the dust heap and try again.

    Leave a comment:


  • AlArchie
    Guest replied
    Re: air brush paint

    I use both air brushes and brush brushes; whatever works best, and each has it's own advantages and disadvantaGES.
    Fish do well with airbrushing and masking. It does take a little practice, but not a terrible amount.

    I started with a cheap Chinese single action model that worked fine until it wore out, and I couldn't find parts; about two fish worth. then I discovered the double action type. I don't think the brand is particualrly important if you stick to the major brands.

    In Michaels Craft store I found a nice double action model, marked as a (of all things) fingernail painting kit, for under a hundred bucks.

    The main thing is to follow the directions for thinning the paint, and if you use acrylic, be sure to use a thinning medium, not plain water. I don't know what it is, but believe me it makes a difference, and you can find that in the art stores, by the pint for a reasonable price. Smaller bottle, bigger price! also be sure to strain the paint through either a special filter medium or a nylon stocking. This get those little microscopic clogging buggers out.

    Al

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  • DAKuehnert
    replied
    Re: air brush paint

    I guess I have more of a question than a reply. I have been carving for 2-3 years and have almost finished my bluegill I have been working on. I am not what I would call a real artist but I am very particular on how the end product looks. My instruction recommend using an airbrush to paint the fish. My questions are. It sounds like airbrushes can be alot of work and pain to use and clean. Are they worth the trouble? Are they hard to use? What would be a good brush and compressor to start with, without spending a lot of money?

    Leave a comment:

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