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Food coloring as a stain

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  • Food coloring as a stain



    I was just wondering if any one has used food coloring as a stain? If so how do you use it. Thank you.

    JTM
    To the world you may be one person,
    but to one person you may be the world.

  • #2
    I have used the paste type and I've mixed it with a bit of water until I got the color I wanted and it worked well.
    Diane
    Dragon
    Owner of a nice 21" Excalibur
    Owner of a Dewalt 788
    PuffityDragon on AFSP

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    • #3
      I havent used it myself, but I do know the colors will fade pretty quickly. Toni and sue use a leather dye thats very brilliant , I would use that as opposed to food coloring. Dale
      Dale w/ yella saws

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      • #4
        I agree. I have used food coloring as a stain before and it does fade. Also, unless you do use the paste, it doesn't go very far. The wood soaks it up like crazy. I haven't tried the leather dyes yet but I would imagine they would be better not only in color but also in applying it.
        Mia

        We are the music makers.
        We are the dreamers of dreams.


        Easy scrollin' with a DW788

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        • #5
          I have not used food color, but I have used leather dye on several projects. In particular Cordovan makes in good cherry color on maple.
          Bill

          I have an RBI Hawk 220-3 VS

          Visit my Gallery
          and website www.billswoodntreasures.com

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          • #6
            I've used food coloring for the dowels in a baby's rattle. I chose food coloring for health reasons. I'm not sure if it will fade. It looked pretty good though. I let it dry really well, then I gave it a couple of coats of mineral oil, (again baby saftey), to protect the food coloring.
            Jim

            The limits of the imagination are imaginary.
            No task is too tedious for Art.
            Rock and Scroll

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            • #7
              I've used food coloring on a few projects. I didn't want the vibrant color of leather dye and it worked well. It did fade, yes, but that's exactly what I wanted. After 2 years the wood (Baltic Birch ply in most cases) is still obviously red, yellow, and green. That's all I wanted and expected from it and feel it worked successfully. So my advice is, determine what short term and long term affect you want, and it just might work if soft, subtle color is what you're after.

              Mine was liquid, right out of the bottle, brushed on and wiped off like using stain on a floral pattern. The subdued colors after 2 years are really quite appealing.

              Andy
              Shoot for the moon. If you miss you'll be headed for a star! www.80artdesigns.com

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              • #8
                Here are some ideas for you to experiment with.

                I haven't used it for colouring wood, but I have used it to colour photographs and they haven't faded.

                The trick was to mix it with some vinegar(S?) to give it some bite.

                So I would experiment with probably a washcoat of shellac to prevent the wood from drinking it all, and also to prevent blotches. Followed with the food coloring mixed with a bit of vinegar.

                How about coloring the Shellac or lacquer with it?
                or Oil?
                Although I would think that it probably wouldn't mix well with oil if it's water based.

                What about Tin-tex (S?) powder laundry dye, that probably would mix with oil and other finishes. Also probably would dilute in a bit of water to color the same as the food coloring.

                Maybe Tin-tex would be worth a try in Alcoohol, or mineral spirit?

                Mac, or anyone else, if you have experimented with any of these finishes, what were your results?

                Curious,
                Marcel
                Last edited by Marcel in Longueuil; 02-19-2007, 02:15 PM.
                http://marleb.com
                DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

                NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

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                • #9
                  Read in a Judy Gale Roberts article that a fellow needed to color a rain slicker yellow and used mustard . Said it worked really well.
                  Smitty
                  Dewalt 788

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                  • #10
                    Food Coloring

                    Jim,

                    Being you want to keep the stain 100% safe, this is what professionals do when they are using water dye stains like the popular "aniline dyes" to get some color pentration into their finishes.

                    Normally, they use resin binders, or chemical mordents, to generally "drive the dye colors into the woods."

                    Here, is what I suggest that you do, you will need a clean sponge, cloth, or brush and some clean water to "wet down the wood." The water will open up the wood fibres and the grains to allow for better color penetration into the wood.

                    Then, you will need to allow the wood to dry, depending on the wood you are using, you may need to repeat the wetting process. After the wood is dry, sand off the raised fibres, and blow or wipe off the wood, and then apply the water stain.

                    Depending on the wood and the strenght of the stain you mix up, you will have be the judge of the final color.

                    As with all new finishing techniques you should always want to begin with "start to finish samples" before you try out the new techniques on your work.

                    Good Luck....

                    Think Twice, And Finish Once

                    [url]www.macsimmons.com[/url
                    Last edited by MacS; 02-19-2007, 06:19 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Thinks for the helpful info Mac. I have been wanting to try the food coloring process but wasn't quite sure how to do it. I will practice on some scrap wood. And as for my camera, remember the one not charging at the openhouse, my son-in-law solved my problem by getting me a battery charger for christmas! Seems kodak didn't want to take my registration of the camera with them when I got it as a gift as "proof of purchase" and wanted to charge me an arm and leg for a new dock, which I didn't use to print pictures anyhow.

                      Betty
                      Betty

                      "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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                      • #12
                        Practice makes perfect, and perfect takes lots of practice.

                        Hi Betty,

                        Thanks,

                        All's well that', ends well.

                        Mac

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Mac
                          As with all new finishing techniques you should always want to begin with "start to finish samples" before you try out the new techniques on your work.
                          Mac, I've seen you refer quite often to start to finish samples
                          Bruce
                          . . . because each piece will be someone's heirloom someday.
                          visit sometime
                          Hawk 220VS, Delta 40-570

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                          • #14
                            Samples, Samples, Samples

                            Hi Bruce,

                            It really depends on the "finish" you will be working on, the more complicated the finish the larger the panel you want to apply it on, as some finshes can be very deceiving when done on larger work.

                            I do most of my samples now on 5"x 5" x1/4". I do my photos from these thin panels you get less shadows, or I can put these panels in my scanner to take their pictures.

                            My reason for always mentioning how important it is make up complete start to finish samples is because (1) it teaches you how the finishes are done (2) it allows you to see if all you finishing materials are compatable with each other (3) it also allows you to make adjustments if they are needed.

                            Mac

                            Think Twice, Finish Once.

                            www.macsimmons.com

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Marcel in Longueuil
                              The trick was to mix it with some vinegar(S?) to give it some bite.
                              Originally posted by Mac
                              Normally, they use resin binders, or chemical mordents, to generally "drive the dye colors into the woods."
                              "mordents", it should be spelled "mordant", is actually a French word that means "biting". and vinegar is also called "acetic acid" thus qualifying it as a chemical.

                              I'm glad you agree with me on this one Mac.

                              Respectfully,
                              Marcel
                              http://marleb.com
                              DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

                              NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

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