Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sanding oak

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • minowevie
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul S WI
    Well Mike I've never had a problem with purple tape so if splinters result when pulling up the purple tape I'd like to know. I would then guess that it has to be a bad piece of Oak, which is possible as I have run across some. Not sure what causes it though.
    reading back, I was wondering, if just maybe, when you do your taping to the piece of wood. is there some ruffness on the sides of the piece. that might be why the tape has something to grab on to. try running a piece of sand papper on the sides of you wood that you are going to glue or tape to. Evie

    Leave a comment:


  • minowevie
    replied
    Hi Mike, I use red and white oak alot. and I don't seem to have the problem you have. I don't use tape at all. and I don't have much trubale with burning. witch, I beleave the tape helps with. also lubes the blade some. but I do know that the blue painters tape will set up and stick alot when let to stand. but brekfuss shouldn't be too long. the purpale painters tape lefts off easyer, after letting is stand longer. also if you wont to use clear packing tape, I have heard hear, that , the cheapest tape is the best. but like I said, I don't use tape at all. except on very thick wood. I have no probleam spraying my patterns on, then useing minerale spirits to remove the pattern after cutting.( spray th pattern not the wood ) and that is my prefured method. as far as sanding. after milling. I do use a belt sander with a 80 t0 100 grit at first. but move quickly and even ly. or you will create a gruve. also. I sand with the grain of the wood. not croswize.I do go side to side, but with the sander sanding with the grain. then i go to my orbitale sander. any derection. starting with a 100 grit to 150- 220- 320. on and on. sanding is not my favorite part of the job. ( like Berry says too. wipe inbetween each grit size, a brush or a soft cloth dampend some. don't wont to get it to wet or you can raise the grain again. or even blow it off with your compresser) also, when i remove my patterns, with minerale spirits,I go back and remove the glue if any is leaft with some more minerale spirits. then, I use a hair dryer , to dry my pieces, then go over the cutouts with a palm sander, again starting with at leaset 100 to 220 to 320 grit. sanding with the grain. this goes pretty fast. I don't try to get my pieces to feel like satin. I dont mind some grain. for I think that gives some cariture to the piece. the finish you use, can make this happen. hope this helped some. Evie

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul S WI
    replied
    Well Mike I've never had a problem with purple tape so if splinters result when pulling up the purple tape I'd like to know. I would then guess that it has to be a bad piece of Oak, which is possible as I have run across some. Not sure what causes it though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Minnesota scroller
    replied
    My test is complete. I adhered a 2" X 5" piece of blue tape to my oak and let it sit while eating breakfast. When I proceeded to pull it off, up came minute slivers with it. I would go with clear packing tape except that if it breaks while removing it, it is so hard to get back underneath it again to get ahold of it. Maybe I need thicker packing tape? I'm going to try spraying the paper and applying direct to the wood. I've done it this way with walnut and had no problem removing it without having to use mineral spirits. I'm beginning to realize that not all woods are created equal. If this doesn't work, it'll be purple tape next.

    Leave a comment:


  • Minnesota scroller
    replied
    Dale, it may be a little of both. However, I do recall when pulling off the tape that some fine splinters did come up with the tape. At the time I remembered this happening with 1/8" BB plywood. I will apply some tape to a small test piece tomorrow and see what happens.

    Leave a comment:


  • lucky788scroller
    replied
    Mike, I really dont think the tape has anything to do with your problem. I always use clear packing tape on scrolling wood, have used regular masking tape on red oak, and have used an industrial double faced cloth tape between layers of red oak, and have never had the problem you are having. I think the sanding technique is culprit. Dale

    Leave a comment:


  • Mick Walker
    replied
    Mike, I use the purple tape on almost all my cuttings and have had good luck with it. Back to the sanding, I will sand up to 400 grit if I am planning to just apply a clear finish. Will only go to 220 grit if I am going to stain the wood, if you go beyond 220 grit then the stain has nothing to "grab" onto.

    Leave a comment:


  • Minnesota scroller
    replied
    While waking this morning, I remembered what caused this problem. When I pulled the blue painters tape off, the tape pulled up some slivers. I hadn't had this happen since my problem with the 1/8" BB ply. This never happens with walnut or maple, but then they don't have the grain that oak has either. I think I'm going to have to try some of that purple tape. I know I can go without tape and use the mineral spirits, so we don't have to revisit that subject.

    However, I'm still going to heed all the advice I received from this thread regarding the sanding.

    Thanks all.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Wilson
    replied
    I tend to agree with the Captain. Red oak has a unique grain pattern. Looking closely at the darker rays, you will see the open grain. Contrast that with the lighter rays that appear more dense. The surface won't appear or feel perfectly flat unless you use a grain filler.

    If you've already removed that much material by sanding, it's hard to imagine that the scratches you see are from your original belt sanding. However it's good advice given that you need to gradually progress up through the sanding grits to get the smoothest, most scratch free surface.

    In regards to your comment about the number of responses to a post, relative to the number of views, I think it's attributable to the fact that many folks are just interested in the topic. I'm familiar with the other woodworking board you mentioned, in fact I responded to your post there as well as here. I lurk there often, but usually by the time I get to reading a post, if I had any input, someone (or several others) have already offered it. The same goes here. I read many of the posts simply to see what information I can glean from them (and I've been able to learn quite a bit, thanks to all). That's the real benefit of a forum like this. I'll chime in if I think I can add something that hasn't already been said or reinforce a point someone else made, but I've always presumed that if a post gets a lot of views and only a few responses, the advice you got in those few responses must be pretty sound. Besides, I tend to get a little wordy (like now), so I try to restrain myself so as not to bore the good folks who are reading this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Capt Weasel
    replied
    It might be just grain. Oak has an open grain and no matter how much you sand it it'll never get as smooth as poplar, for instance. If you start sanding the face side with 80 gr. you might play h*&# getting the scratches out. After planing I start no lower than 120 then 150, 220 and maybe 320 & 400 if necc. Now matter how the planer cuts, ie. snipe, ridges from worn blades etc., the 120 up gets it done. I always use an orbital sander or 1/4 palm sander only. Never a belt and I use that only for edge work.

    Leave a comment:


  • lucky788scroller
    replied
    try HAND sanding it, WITH the grain. You should have a really nice finish ready piece with 180 grit, if hand sanded properly. Dale

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul S WI
    replied
    Mike, as a couple of people have already mentioned graduate to the next higher grit. Don't skip any grit steps. You say your started with 80, personally after I plane a board the lowest grit paper I use is 120 then 150 and 180. The planing cut is already smoother enough to skip even 100. However, I use a circular random orbit sander. The ROS really does a great job and I don't have to worry about grain direction that much.
    I suspect you are right in that part of the problem may have been using a belt sander w/80 grit. Unless your planer left a very bad cut. Also, let the grit on the sandpaper do the work. Any extra human pressure serves only to wear out the granules before the sanding is accomplished. I just guide my ROS as the weight of the sander is enough pressure to do the job. I also have the luxury of having a Performax table sander which does most of my work. Wouldn't be without either of these sanders.

    Leave a comment:


  • NC Scroller
    replied
    Mike, I avoid a belt sander except for extreme sanding and shaping of large pieces. I find belt sanders remove to much wood to fast. They also can gouge if you are not very careful. Even after planning boards 90% of my sanding is done with an orbital sander.

    Leave a comment:


  • Minnesota scroller
    replied
    Originally posted by Gill
    Are you confident that there's nothing contaminating your palm sander, both on the abrasive and between the abrasive and its mount?
    Gill
    If anything, it might have been the belt on my belt sander. I did use a little pressure and the scratches or shallow gouges, whatever you want to call them, did run the direction of the belt. But then, that's also the direction of the grain. It does get me thinking though. I think nest time I'll skip the belt sander and just use the palm sander. I've never had a problem with the palm sander on BB ply.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steviegwood
    replied
    Mike, as you probably have gathered already, I work for quite a large cabinet manufacturer and we sand thousands of cabinet doors and frames a day. On our door sanding lines what they call a cross face/ polishing sander which is the last thing they go through. The doors are sanded with a 240 grit. Now when they go to the finishing dept. there is a sanding sealer applied before the stain/paint and topcoat. Hope that helps. Steve

    Leave a comment:

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse

Latest Topics

Collapse

Working...
X