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  • MacS
    replied
    Adding colorants into BLO

    Daryl,

    Being, that BLO is oil based, you will need to purchase compatible colorants.

    In the "pigmented colorants" you can buy small tubes either the Universal, Japan, or Oil colors at most arts and craft shops, to thin out these paste colorants use Minieral Spirits / Paint Thinners.
    (these two are both the same solvents)

    Once the stain is mixed, then apply the stain, and then wipe off the stain to acheive a uniform color, and then allow several hours for thorough drying, and then you can apply your clear coats.

    If you want to add dye stains into the BLO then you will need to buy the "oil type dye," there are some companies that sell a oil/lacquer dye, you can purchase this one too, you will need to first dissovle the dye in a little Lacquer Thinners to break down the dry powders into a liquid, and then add a little Mineral Spirits, and then mix the stain well. I suggest that you always strain "dye stains" because not every particle may dissolve. You can buy paint strainers, some coffee strainers work, and a piece tight knitted cloth will work. They also sell liquid dyes that can be added into the BLO, some dyes like the NGR stains (non- grain raising) can also be used.

    I would ask your supplier, if you can add the "dyes" into BLO to be sure, there are many types out there and you want to get the right one.

    Be sure, that you allow the stains to completely dry, before you apply any clear coats.

    I hope this helps.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daryl185
    replied
    They both contain metallic driers to speed up the drying time, the difference maybe the Danish Oil contains resins, solvent, and colorants. Which some finishers also add to the Boiled Linseed Oil.

    Hi Mac, your comment above has given me another question to ask what types of colorant are we talking about ie.. stains, dyes, and how do you add it? as the saying goes inquiring minds want to know

    Leave a comment:


  • MacS
    replied
    Danish Oil vs Boiled Linseed Oil

    I use Watcos Danish oil. I apply 2 coats about 30-45 minutes apart on my portraits.

    Capt, If that works for you, then keep it up, but I don't see the advantage in doing 2 coats when the first coat has not dried and formed a layer. I think you may only be delaying the drying.

    I've never applied any poly or laquer on them. Should I as a sealant?

    The Danish Oil is the sealant and the coating. The choice is yours, you can if you want too apply lacquer or poly over the dried Danish Oil.

    Whats the difference between the DO and BLO as far as grain enhancement etc. I know the drying time is longer for the BLO due it not having the hardeners in it that the DO has, I think.

    They both contain metallic driers to speed up the drying time, the difference maybe the Danish Oil contains resins, solvent, and colorants. Which some finishers also add to the Boiled Linseed Oil.


    Leave a comment:


  • Capt Weasel
    replied
    I use Watcos Danish oil. I apply 2 coats about 30-45 minutes apart on my portraits. I've never applied any poly or laquer on them. Should I as a sealant? Whats the difference between the DO and BLO as far as grain enhancement etc. I know the drying time is longer for the BLO due it not having the hardeners in it that the DO has, I think.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daryl185
    replied
    that works for me, thanks to Mac and Bill for the great info

    Leave a comment:


  • MacS
    replied
    Re using "Oily Clothes"

    Daryl,

    Here you go, place them in a jar with a cover.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • MacS
    replied
    OIly Rags

    Daryl,

    I'll tell you an old trick I use, I mention this in my finishing articles on "oil finishes."

    When you get done with your oily clothes, place them in glass jars with covers, this will keep them pliable, and you will be ablle to use them over, and over, and over for a long time.

    Bill, whatever works for you, is good for you, so keep it going.

    Leave a comment:


  • William Young (SE BC)
    replied
    Hi Mac
    Do you wipe off the coating of oil, or let it dry itself.
    From what I have been able to gather over the years, most scrollers use the 50/50 mix for fretwork. It is only for grain enhancement and sealing of the wood against atmospheric conditions and because it has more penetration by being thinned it actually dries/cures faster than using it not thinned.
    Yes, we wipe it off the large flat areas with a lint free cloth and blow out any that might remain in the fretwork with compressed air.
    I have applied lacquer on top of it after 12 to 24 hours with no ill effect but I prefer to let it fully cure for 48 hours if it is not a rush job.
    Depending on the wood, there can be some seeping of oil out of the grain whether used thinned or straight after a given number of hours so that is why I recommend 48 or more hours to give any seepage some extra time to cure.
    The wiping off and blowing it out are for the purpose of keeping seepage to a bare minimum.
    W.Y.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daryl185
    replied
    Daryl, which ever "drying oil" your using be very careful with the used rags be sure you properly dispose of them.
    question Mac as long as I leave the rags out to air dry is there any reason why they can't be reused and if not what is the proper way of disposing of them, I know BLO generates heat and not to pile the rags or to throw them in with trash.

    as for applying the oil I soaked each piece in a large aluminum pan brushed of the excess and let it set out on towles to absorb the rest

    Leave a comment:


  • MacS
    replied
    Bill

    Whatever works for you.

    By thinning out the BLO you will not leave much of a film on the wood. this would also take longer to cure because of the added solvent. Do you wipe off the coating of oil, or let it dry itself.

    Leave a comment:


  • William Young (SE BC)
    replied
    I mix the BLO 50/50 with mineral spirits as a grain enhancer and sealer and usually give it 48 hours before applying any kind of lacquer or poly finish coats over it.
    W.Y.

    Leave a comment:


  • MacS
    replied
    There are 2 Linseed Oils

    There are 2 kinds of linseed oil, #1- is raw linseed oil and #2- is "boiled linseed oil" (which actually is not boiled) The raw linseed oil is very, very slow drying and normally is not used as a finish.

    BLO contains a metallic drier, these are chemicals that speed up the drying time in the linseed oil, when you see the term "OIL FINISHES" these coatings usually contain BLO as the drying oil in these finishes, they may also contain resins, solvents, tung oil or even colorants. These are sometimes called modified oil finishes. one of the modified oils is WATCO, which is commonly used by many woodworkers and scrollers.

    I don't know what you mean by "it takes a long time." I do know that the dry times are effected by the way one applies the drying oil, and the ambient temperature where the pieces are left to cure, but under most conditions these OIL FINISHES including BLO if the oil is wiped dry, and then left to dry overnight, it can then be safely coated, as "drying oils" dry from the top down. I think each of us must do their own testing as we all work differetly and live in different climates.

    Daryl, which ever "drying oil" your using be very careful with the used rags be sure you properly dispose of them.
    Last edited by MacS; 12-17-2006, 12:19 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mick Walker
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • Daryl185
    replied
    thanks Mac

    Leave a comment:


  • MacS
    replied
    Boiled Linseed Oil

    Darly,

    Yes, you certainly can, let it dry overnight, unless you have low temperatures then allow more time.

    Leave a comment:

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