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  • Blo

    used Boiled Linseed Oil for the first time today and I am most immpressed with it its so much easier then stain and really inhances the grain and beauty of the wood my one question can you spray a satin or gloss finish over it once its dry?
    Daryl S. Walters Psycotic scroller with a DeWalt 788

  • #2
    Boiled Linseed Oil

    Darly,

    Yes, you certainly can, let it dry overnight, unless you have low temperatures then allow more time.

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    • #3
      thanks Mac
      Daryl S. Walters Psycotic scroller with a DeWalt 788

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      • #4
        Mick, - Delta P-20

        A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

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        • #5
          There are 2 Linseed Oils

          There are 2 kinds of linseed oil, #1- is raw linseed oil and #2- is "boiled linseed oil" (which actually is not boiled) The raw linseed oil is very, very slow drying and normally is not used as a finish.

          BLO contains a metallic drier, these are chemicals that speed up the drying time in the linseed oil, when you see the term "OIL FINISHES" these coatings usually contain BLO as the drying oil in these finishes, they may also contain resins, solvents, tung oil or even colorants. These are sometimes called modified oil finishes. one of the modified oils is WATCO, which is commonly used by many woodworkers and scrollers.

          I don't know what you mean by "it takes a long time." I do know that the dry times are effected by the way one applies the drying oil, and the ambient temperature where the pieces are left to cure, but under most conditions these OIL FINISHES including BLO if the oil is wiped dry, and then left to dry overnight, it can then be safely coated, as "drying oils" dry from the top down. I think each of us must do their own testing as we all work differetly and live in different climates.

          Daryl, which ever "drying oil" your using be very careful with the used rags be sure you properly dispose of them.
          Last edited by MacS; 12-17-2006, 01:19 PM.

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          • #6
            I mix the BLO 50/50 with mineral spirits as a grain enhancer and sealer and usually give it 48 hours before applying any kind of lacquer or poly finish coats over it.
            W.Y.
            http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

            The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

            Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

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            • #7
              Bill

              Whatever works for you.

              By thinning out the BLO you will not leave much of a film on the wood. this would also take longer to cure because of the added solvent. Do you wipe off the coating of oil, or let it dry itself.

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              • #8
                Daryl, which ever "drying oil" your using be very careful with the used rags be sure you properly dispose of them.
                question Mac as long as I leave the rags out to air dry is there any reason why they can't be reused and if not what is the proper way of disposing of them, I know BLO generates heat and not to pile the rags or to throw them in with trash.

                as for applying the oil I soaked each piece in a large aluminum pan brushed of the excess and let it set out on towles to absorb the rest
                Daryl S. Walters Psycotic scroller with a DeWalt 788

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                • #9
                  Hi Mac
                  Do you wipe off the coating of oil, or let it dry itself.
                  From what I have been able to gather over the years, most scrollers use the 50/50 mix for fretwork. It is only for grain enhancement and sealing of the wood against atmospheric conditions and because it has more penetration by being thinned it actually dries/cures faster than using it not thinned.
                  Yes, we wipe it off the large flat areas with a lint free cloth and blow out any that might remain in the fretwork with compressed air.
                  I have applied lacquer on top of it after 12 to 24 hours with no ill effect but I prefer to let it fully cure for 48 hours if it is not a rush job.
                  Depending on the wood, there can be some seeping of oil out of the grain whether used thinned or straight after a given number of hours so that is why I recommend 48 or more hours to give any seepage some extra time to cure.
                  The wiping off and blowing it out are for the purpose of keeping seepage to a bare minimum.
                  W.Y.
                  http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

                  The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

                  Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

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                  • #10
                    OIly Rags

                    Daryl,

                    I'll tell you an old trick I use, I mention this in my finishing articles on "oil finishes."

                    When you get done with your oily clothes, place them in glass jars with covers, this will keep them pliable, and you will be ablle to use them over, and over, and over for a long time.

                    Bill, whatever works for you, is good for you, so keep it going.

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                    • #11
                      Re using "Oily Clothes"

                      Daryl,

                      Here you go, place them in a jar with a cover.
                      Attached Files

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                      • #12
                        that works for me, thanks to Mac and Bill for the great info
                        Daryl S. Walters Psycotic scroller with a DeWalt 788

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                        • #13
                          I use Watcos Danish oil. I apply 2 coats about 30-45 minutes apart on my portraits. I've never applied any poly or laquer on them. Should I as a sealant? Whats the difference between the DO and BLO as far as grain enhancement etc. I know the drying time is longer for the BLO due it not having the hardeners in it that the DO has, I think.
                          Confuscious says, "The cautious seldom err".
                          Confuscious didn't own a scrollsaw either.

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                          • #14
                            Danish Oil vs Boiled Linseed Oil

                            I use Watcos Danish oil. I apply 2 coats about 30-45 minutes apart on my portraits.

                            Capt, If that works for you, then keep it up, but I don't see the advantage in doing 2 coats when the first coat has not dried and formed a layer. I think you may only be delaying the drying.

                            I've never applied any poly or laquer on them. Should I as a sealant?

                            The Danish Oil is the sealant and the coating. The choice is yours, you can if you want too apply lacquer or poly over the dried Danish Oil.

                            Whats the difference between the DO and BLO as far as grain enhancement etc. I know the drying time is longer for the BLO due it not having the hardeners in it that the DO has, I think.

                            They both contain metallic driers to speed up the drying time, the difference maybe the Danish Oil contains resins, solvent, and colorants. Which some finishers also add to the Boiled Linseed Oil.


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                            • #15
                              They both contain metallic driers to speed up the drying time, the difference maybe the Danish Oil contains resins, solvent, and colorants. Which some finishers also add to the Boiled Linseed Oil.

                              Hi Mac, your comment above has given me another question to ask what types of colorant are we talking about ie.. stains, dyes, and how do you add it? as the saying goes inquiring minds want to know
                              Daryl S. Walters Psycotic scroller with a DeWalt 788

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