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  • Finishes for Kitchen Spoons

    I have made several flat stir spoons and need advise on what finish if any can safely be used on something that will be used with food.

    I used 1/4 inch oak and have sanded them very smooth but when I wet them the grain raises making them feel a little rough.

    in advance for any advise.
    Gary from Ohio
    Delta P-20

  • #2
    I'd say mineral oil. you can buy it at any drug store. sure the grain wll raise when you put it in water, lightly sand it down again. with a few coats of mineral oil and a few sandings, you'll be good to go.
    Jeff Powell

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    • #3
      Jeff,

      Thank you for your reply.
      Gary from Ohio
      Delta P-20

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      • #4
        A second thought...

        As mineral oil is non- toxic, the problem is mineral oil never dries..

        Another, oil that also is non-toxic is 100% Tung Oil, this is a "drying oil" that will actually put a 100% safe coating on your wood.

        I suggest you apply at least three or more coats to protect the wood.

        Good Luck
        Last edited by MacS; 11-25-2006, 10:01 AM.

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        • #5
          Gary, from what I understand, all finishes are non-toxic once they are dry.
          Mick, - Delta P-20

          A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

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          • #6
            I wouldn't apply any finish. Wooden spoons you buy in the shops for culinary purposes don't have a finish.

            If the bare wood was intrisically hazardous to the food in an unfinished state, retailers wouldn't be allowed to sell such products. Moreover, wood such as oak is used extensively in the production of smoked meats.

            Gill
            There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
            (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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            • #7
              Proof it.....It may only be hearsay?

              "If the bare wood was intrisically hazardous to the food in an unfinished state, retailers wouldn't be allowed to sell such products."

              WHY ! Because, all coatings are suppose to be safe once they are fully cured? If this is true, then ask your coating company to show you a certificate proving this. I would love to see it.

              In case you did not know, there are some woods that are food safe, while other woods are not.

              I'll look forward to seeing a "food safe" coating certificate.
              Last edited by MacS; 11-25-2006, 12:17 PM.

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              • #8
                Look what you started Gary. All I know for as a solid fact is that cutting boards come with mineral oil and have to be re-oiled regularly. I never saw a spoon come with a finish on it, but figure if you want a finish, mineral oil is definitely safe. Don't drink the bottle unless you have one of them canadian toilets.
                Jeff Powell

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                • #9
                  Didn't we go through this in here a while back?

                  Back
                  Delta P-20 & Q-3

                  I wondered why the baseball was getting bigger. Then it hit me!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Greenfield_Bob
                    Didn't we go through this in here a while back?

                    Back
                    Sure did Bob....right here.
                    The bottom line is that all finishes are food-safe once fully cured. Other than Mac, every finishing article from reputable sources I've read agrees with this. If you want a durable finish, I'd suggest a good pulyurethane varnish. As far as proof, the FDA guidelines for what is permitted on wood intended for contact with food is righthere and here.
                    Of particular interest to this subject is Chapter 4 of the 2001 Food code, section 4-101.19

                    They do specifically state that close grained woods such as maple are acceptable for contact with food in an unfinished state. This is the exception as they also state that no unfinished wood should be in contact with food. This is probably why most of the utensils you see are maple.
                    Last edited by Jediscroller; 11-25-2006, 01:33 PM.
                    Kevin
                    Scrollsaw Patterns Online
                    Making holes in wood with an EX-30, Craftsman 16" VS, Dremel 1680 and 1671

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                    • #11
                      I guess I should have used maple instead of oak. I was not going to finish it but when I wet it with water it raised the grain so I resanded and have added some mineral oil and will let it set for awhile then wipe down and see how it looks if I do not like it I will cut some more out of maple.

                      Thank you all for the replys and yes I did remember a previous tread but could not find it when I did a search. Just found thread about finishes on fret work.
                      Gary from Ohio
                      Delta P-20

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                      • #12

                        ============================================

                        I think, you better re-read those food safe articles, there is no company that ever submitted an approval samples to get the food safe coating permit or certificate. Because, they are all afraid that their coatings may fail the test creating a lot of problems for them and the others. All the other companies, would rather "leave well enough alone, as it is now."
                        They are willing to go along with that "once the solvents leave the coating, it is safe," I don't think, most people realize the chemical additives that remain in the coating after it does dry and cure, these are acid catalyst, formaldahydes, isocyanates, etc. all of these shall remain encapsulated in the coating forever these do not evaporate but become a part of the dry coating. What happens to these additives and the catalysts, they may remain dormant, but do they ever become food safe. (who knows)

                        Do any of the articles you ever read ever discuss or even mention these things these things, all the mention is the sovents, today, the solvents being used in coatings are not the same solvents that were used years ago.

                        I have my reasons and my doubts about their theory with the dried solvents, you all feel free to do as you want.

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                        • #13
                          I have made many , many, dozens of spurtles and spatulas and spooons and put mineral oil on every one.
                          They also recommend re-coating them with it occasionally.

                          check this http://www.seafoamwoodturning.com/Shopping/spurtle.htm

                          You can even drink it but with it being an old fashioned laxative remedy I wouldn't advise it
                          I just sold out of them again today at a craft sale and took orders for more so I have to make a bunch more in the next few days

                          W.Y.
                          http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

                          The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

                          Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mac
                            Kevin

                            "Where does it mention furniture or food utensils?"
                            Here, I'll help you....this is a copy and paste of the title of Chapter 4:

                            Chapter
                            4

                            Equipment, Utensils, and Linens

                            You obviously have your opinion and are welcome to it.

                            If the rest of you would like to read some leading finishing expert's thoughts on the myth of food-safe finishes, this is a good start.
                            Last edited by Jediscroller; 11-25-2006, 04:44 PM.
                            Kevin
                            Scrollsaw Patterns Online
                            Making holes in wood with an EX-30, Craftsman 16" VS, Dremel 1680 and 1671

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Proof is not assuptions

                              I think, there are to many assumptions in that article, and not enough facts or proof. there are two sides to this story, and I believe that no company wants to proof the theory, they rather go with the flow about once the solvents evaporate and the coating is dry, we can assume that all coatings are safe.

                              Here are some facts and some assumptions.

                              No manufacturer providing finishes to the woodworking community puts their finishes through these tests. Thus, no manufacturer can legitimately claim they meet FDA regulations. (that is a fact) He said, it.


                              The solvents, which cause some people to worry, evaporate out completely enough so they aren't a problem. And catalysts, which can be toxic in their liquid state, become so fully reacted with the finish that there is no evidence of a problem. (an assumption)


                              You can't be absolutely sure about the food safeness of any finish you put on wood. There could even be problems with mineral oil and walnut oil that we just don't know of yet. There could also be problems with raw linseed oil, pure tung oil, wax, shellac and salad bowl finish, because we don't know where these substances have been or what they might have come in contact with. None has met the regulations laid out by the FDA. (that is a fact)
                              He said, it.


                              There is no indication that these driers cause health problems. A very small amount is used, and it is well encased in the cured finish film so that if any is ingested, it passes through the body without causing harm. (another assumption, with no proof)


                              The solvents, which cause some people to worry, evaporate out completely enough so they aren't a problem. And catalysts, which can be toxic in their liquid state, become so fully reacted with the finish that there is no evidence of a problem. (another assumption, not a fact)


                              But, based on FDA regulations, the way finishes are made, the complete lack of any evidence to the contrary, and the countless other untested objects food and children come in contact with, there's no reasonable argument for avoiding the use of any finish. (another assuption, not a fact)

                              Only you can decide on what you want to use, I think, you can see there is more assumption in the article, and not enough proof, I think his comment about "None ( of the coatings) has met the regulations laid out by the FDA." is proof of all coatings not meeting the regulations, and should now be worth second thoughts.

                              Mac
                              Last edited by MacS; 11-25-2006, 06:01 PM.

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