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Finishing fretwork

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  • Finishing fretwork

    As a beginner scrollsawer, I enjoy fretwork but I'm having a difficult time applying finish. What is an easy way of applying finish to fretworks and giving it a professional finish look?
    Thanks for any help I may recieve.

  • #2
    Re: Finishing fretwork

    I haven't done much in fretworks, but for carvings I almost always use 'Deft' spray, either semi-gloss or gloss. Maybe someone else has another idea.

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    • #3
      Re: Finishing fretwork

      Like most everything else, it pretty much depends on the look you are trying for. As Hi-Ho said, Deft spray works well. Another option is wood sealer or pre-stain followed by clear shoe polish or other wax applied with a soft brush. Oil fishishes such as tung oil or oil based stains work also. If the piece is small enough you can dip it and hang it to dry. If not use a soft brush, like a paint brush. Patience is the key word when dealing with delicate stuff like fret work.

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      • #4
        Re: Finishing fretwork

        I finish a majority of my work with boiled linseed oil cut 50/50 with thinners

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        • #5
          Re: Finishing fretwork

          I prefer to use a danish oil. I pour it in a big pan, then just dip the whole project in the pan. It works great and has no runs like I have trouble with a spray varnish.

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          • #6
            Say, Hi_Ho_Sliver, when using the Deft spray do you stain first or just spray in on unfinished wood? I want to try it and want to make it look good as well.
            -Bill

            My saw is a DeWalt788 Measure twice; cut once; count fingers after cut

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            • #7
              Finishing

              I too have a problem with trying to stain a piece with a lot of fret cutouts. The wall shelf I just finished is an example. Some of the holes or cutouts are just to small to get even a small paint brush into them.

              Something I might try is to dip the project as mentioned above. I think a person can get those throw away cake pans of almost any size, so I'd get one big enough to hold about 1 inch of stain and then set the project piece into the stain, take it out and wipe it off. I think doing the staining before you glue some pieces together would also eliminate the discoloration caused by trying to stain an area where there maybe was some excess glue.

              Any way I offer this just as a suggestion. The Wall shelf I did, was stained and than I sprayed a product from MINWAX called Fast Drying Polyurethane Superior Durability...I used a clear satin. I think I got it at Home Depot or a place like that.

              Jim
              Jim Paskett
              RBI HAWK 220

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