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  • Neal Moore
    replied
    I prefer a satin or semi-gloss final finish on segmentation. It just doesn't look good with a high gloss.....makes the wood look like plastic to me. I've had good results using Minwax Polycrylic waterbased spray in clear semi gloss on segmentation. It levels nicely, dries fast and leaves a nice satin finish. You will still need a well ventilated area to use it. Although the odor doesn't linger as long as some other types of spray it's still there and is also highly flammable as are about all types of spray on finishes. Also as Dale mentioned, you can achieve some really great color and shading effects using smear mixing and dry brushing of your stains when coloring your segments. We have several good segmentation and intarsia artisans here on the forum so if you have further questions just ask away!!! Folks here are happy to help!!!

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  • lucky788scroller
    replied
    What Jedi said is pretty valuable info. On segmentation, experiment and dont be afraid to bend the rules a little by shading with various stains or color washes.For finishing, there really are no set rules, just have fun doing it, safely. Dale

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  • Jediscroller
    replied
    Jean,
    This is largely a personal preference. While many will I'm sure offer advise, I can only speak for myself.
    For hardwood fretwork I like Danish Oil with a topcoat of Deft Clear lacquer. For plywood (baltic birch) portraits and intarsia, I like just the Deft. These offer me the most economical and quick means for finishing my work as I don't have the time to wait for things to dry as I'm usually getting stuff ready at the last minute for fairs and such.

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  • Jeanm45
    started a topic Finishing

    Finishing

    What's the best thing to use for finishing, on segmentation and portrait?


    Best regards
    Jean

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  • markdavd
    Reply to Frustrated
    by markdavd
    When a blade slips out, the tendency is to tighten it more. Make sure you haven't over-tightened the clamp forcing the sides apart. Most OEM clamps are made from soft aluminum so once it starts they will continue spreading and it will be near-impossible to keep the blades in place.

    I've...
    Yesterday, 10:03 AM
  • Sandy Oaks
    Reply to Frustrated
    by Sandy Oaks
    Blade slippage is a function of the blade clamp holder and or the set screw and thumb screw with swivel.
    Yesterday, 09:40 AM
  • NC Scroller
    Reply to Frustrated
    by NC Scroller
    Tricia what saw do you have? Does the blade slip or it just won’t tighten?
    Yesterday, 08:01 AM
  • wjbclocks1
    Reply to Frustrated
    by wjbclocks1
    Are yoou sure that your not puting the blades to far up in the top clamps,. ( l learned thst the hard way)...
    Yesterday, 07:46 AM
  • cwmagee
    Reply to Frustrated
    by cwmagee
    Have you tried to rough up the thumb screws tips? How old are the blade clamps? may be time to replaced them.
    Yesterday, 06:48 AM
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