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  • Bill Wilson
    replied
    Originally posted by AD Sadler View Post
    I have used a water based stain and a "Diamond Finish" Varathane spray and so far its been ok but its only two years experiance so??If anybody has any long term advice before I finish my next project please reply.
    If your current finishing schedule is working for you, then no need to necessarily change it. If you are unsatisfied with some aspect, then more specifics could be offered as to other directions you may take.

    If you are interested in learning more about wood finishes, I recommend the following books;

    Taunton's Complete Illustrated Guide to Finishing - Jeff Jewitt - Google Books

    Understanding Wood Finishing - ShopWoodworking.com

    Both are excellent resources and provide a thorough description of the various types of finishing products available, their properties, pros & cons, application methods, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • marshall
    replied
    Tim on small projects I use the spray Poly or Laquer , on the larger projects I use the wipe on finishes or Poly applyed with foam bushes ..that is after I use the wood condioners or stains and sealers .........

    Leave a comment:


  • AD Sadler
    replied
    I have used a water based stain and a "Diamond Finish" Varathane spray and so far its been ok but its only two years experiance so??If anybody has any long term advice before I finish my next project please reply.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mick Walker
    replied
    Tim, Minwax has a tung oil finish that works well. I have always had good luck with Formby's tung oil finish available in either low gloss or gloss. Light sanding between coats. Can be applied by wiping it on or brushing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Minwax natural stain is the only stain I have used the past 2 years. I would highly recommend applying a finish on top such as poly or lacquer. Like Bill stated, the stain is not really giving the piece any real protection. Even if its just something you're hanging on the wall, I have found that the stain can slowly leak out of the pores of the wood like Red Oak. A finish will seal those pores up. I also feel that applying a finish will greatly help your work from warping with the changes in humidity, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Wilson
    replied
    When the can says that the stain seals, in effect, all it really means is that the first coat of stain has sealed the wood to the point where a 2nd coat won't penetrate as much. It really offers no protective qualities whatsoever as far as dirt, moisture and abrasion resistance is concerned. Whether or not you "need" a topcoat is determined by how much protection the piece requires, based on how it's used and the environment in which it will reside.

    Typically the question of a topcoat is just as much about achieving a particular look as it is about protecting the piece. This is particularly true with regards to pieces that are mostly decorative. A scrolled plaque that hangs on the wall only has to look good, so choose a finish (or none) that achieves the appearance you want. Compare this to a table that will see regular use and the choice of finish has to take into account a lot more factors.

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  • NC Scroller
    replied
    The "finish oil" will increase the shine and provide protection from some the elements (moisture, oil form finger prints, etc). So if making furniture or a project that will be handled I would say yes you must but for a project that will be a wall hanging it is not required.

    BTW for a finish coat I often use spray can finishes such as Deft. I DO NOT USE WATER BASED POLY SPRAY AS THEY COME OUT LUMPY AND HAVE RUINED SEVERAL PROJECTS.

    Leave a comment:


  • tagordy
    started a topic minwax stain

    minwax stain

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