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  • painting wood

    I have a question about painting, is it ok to paint over a polyurethane gloss or semigloss finish, what I have in mind is stack cutting several Christmas ornaments but am not sure how to go about finishing them, any and all ideas are welcome TIA
    Daryl S. Walters Psycotic scroller with a DeWalt 788

  • #2
    are you just putting the poly gloss on after your finished cutting and sanding with nothing else on it or are you putting stain or anything on first before that ?

    if you stain it do that first then the paint then poly gloss and if no stain then paint first then the gloss ,

    hope that helps ,


    Charlie,
    Charlie
    "Everything Happens for a Reason"
    Craftsman 18in. 21609

    http://wolfmooncreations.weebly.com

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    • #3
      Are you thinking of:

      a Sawing wood that's already got a finish, or

      b Sawing wood that doesn't have a finish but which you'd like to coat with polyurethane before painting, or

      c Painting wood that already has a polyurethane finish?

      If a, I'd suggest removing the finish before you start to saw.
      If b, I'd suggest painting the wood before applying a polyurethane finish.
      If c, you can probably apply an oil-based paint but the result won't be as good as if you had removed the finish first. Over time, you'll find the top surface will crackle as the bottom surface continues to cure at a different rate. Even though the bottom surface might have been applied years ago and be very hard to the touch, the surface will continue to contract.

      If you're starting out with bare wood, I'd recommend that you should saw it to shape before applying any paint, then apply the finish. Acrylic (or latex? Anglo/American translation help is required !) paint is my usual choice because it dries quicker and is friendlier to children. There's no reason why you couldn't apply a protective polyurethane finish over the top of acrylic paint but you couldn't apply an acrylic finish over the top of an oil-based paint.

      Hope this helps .

      Gill
      There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
      (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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      • #4
        Another thought .

        If you're making Christmas baubles that will hang, suspend them all from pieces of thread and spin them. Then spray your paint at them whilst they're spinning using an aerosol (or similar) to get even coats applied quickly.

        Gill
        There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
        (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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        • #5
          Gill,
          "Over here" I think we usually refer to the water-thinnable craft paints usually found in 2 oz (59 ml, for those countries far-sighted enough to use a base 10 system) as acrylics. They also come in bigger bottles, and in a thicker version, in tubes (artists acrylics). While wet, they clean up with water. Dry they are somewhat plastic.
          For walls,ceilings, furniture, etc. we usually call them latex paints, and they are mostly available in cans from 4 oz or so to five gallons or so. Wet, they also clean up with water. Dry, they may have a matte or satin or gloss finish.
          Lazy folks such as I sometimes call them "water based", but in reality they are not - they're water soluble, I think.
          Someone more knowledgable about the technical stuff will probably elaborate on this or correct it, but this nomenclature would get you what you want from a craft or DIY store.
          Sandy
          PS Good explanation of what over what, and why!
          S

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          • #6
            Many thanks Sandy .

            I was worried that I might confuse Daryl because the water-soluble paints we use on our walls are known as 'emulsion', yet I use this sort of paint as a primer for my acrylic paints. It's much cheaper than buying proper acrylic primer and I'm so frugal! But I was worried that I might have 'mis-translated' the names in my earlier post.

            Incidentally, Daryl, if you're going to paint wood, always apply an undercoat. If you don't, the wood will soak up the paint and give a blotchy, washed-out appearance. Make sure you don't use an oil-based undercoat if you're going to use acrylic paints, but it's okay to use an acrylic or latex undercoat if you're going to use oil-based paints.

            Gill
            There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
            (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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            • #7
              yes I want to cut out Christmas tree ornaments and I wanted to know if I can apply paint over the gloss finish or should I paint it then apply the gloss finish?
              Daryl S. Walters Psycotic scroller with a DeWalt 788

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              • #8
                Daryl;
                yes I want to cut out Christmas tree ornaments and I wanted to know if I can apply paint over the gloss finish or should I paint it then apply the gloss finish?
                I would suggest the paint and preferably a flat or low luster one first followed by the gloss finish.
                If you apply a gloss finish first and then try to paint over it you could have problems with the paint not sticking or peeling off unless you lightly sand the gloss finish to give the top paint coat some*tooth* to adhere to the shiny gloss finish below it.. DAMHIKT (don't ask me how I know that )
                W.Y.
                Last edited by William Young (SE BC); 07-17-2006, 12:03 AM.
                http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

                The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

                Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

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                • #9
                  Paintiing on wood

                  I paint on wood all the time, using acrylic paints. I usually I thin them with a bit of water to make them spread smoothly. I like to see the wood show through for most projects, but for more solid colors like you would put on ornaments I do two coats, let it dry then finish with 2 - 3 light coats of crystal clear acrylic spray. Lacquer and poly work well too. I cover a flat surface with newspaper, then lay wood slats 1/2" x 1/2" x 24" to keep the ornaments from sticking to the paper. Lay the ornaments across the slats leaving a little space between, then lightly spray the backs first, let dry, then do the fronts making sure all the surfaces are covered nicely. (Be sure to read the directions on the spray can.) I rarely paint on 'good wood' unless to add minor details. I make ornaments mostly from 1/8" Baltic Birch plywood. It works well for painting without having to basecoat it.

                  BJ Holm

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                  • #10
                    thank you all for the info, you all have given me exactly what I needed to know.................... I can see why everyone loves this group
                    Daryl S. Walters Psycotic scroller with a DeWalt 788

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I would like to add one more thought to what others have said -
                      After the paint has dried on your project, sand it using a piece of brown paper bag. It doesn't need much sanding, just rub the bag over it a few times. Then apply your final finish to it.
                      Theresa E
                      Theresa

                      http://WoodNGoods.weebly.com

                      http://woodngoods.blogspot.com

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                      • #12
                        Treasa. I have seen the brown papper bag thing, I would like to know. do you?? crinkal it up first or just rub it on flat. and also. dose this not leave hairs or anything. why use the brown papper bag. looks like a good idea to me. I use news papper on windows while cleaning. is it the same thing?? I do crinkale it up first. I would like to know more about this . thanks Evie

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                        • #13
                          Hi Theresa

                          Like Evie, I have reservations about that technique too. I've heard of people using the paper bag technique on clear finishes, but never paint. If you're using 'bare' acrylic, wouldn't the dust from dark colors contaminate the lighter colors? Surely you'd need to apply a clear sealer first?

                          Or am I worriting over nothing (again ) ?

                          Gill
                          There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                          (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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                          • #14
                            Gill & Evie,
                            I'm definitely not Theresa but I'd like to jump in here. The buffing with a brown paper bag will not harm your painting in anyway, provided your paint is dry. I have done alot of decorative painting and use a brown paper bag all the time. It gives the finished wood such a nice silky feel without removing any of the paint, as would happen with fine steel wool, or sanding sponges. Buffing with brown paper, seems to flatten out the acrylic paint and it allows the final coat of finish to go on so smooth.
                            A side note here, I use brown paper buffing when I have stained something, before I put on the final finish, I hand rub with paper.

                            Evie,
                            You can bunch the paper up if you want, actually your project will tell you if the paper needs to be bunched or not.

                            Thanks Theresa for bringing this up, I feel buffing with brown paper is a very important step when painting wood.

                            Marsha
                            LIFE'S SHORT, USE IT WELL

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                            • #15
                              What Marsha said! LOL Thanks Marsha!

                              Evie - I like to use the fresh, uncrinkled bag. But I have heard others crinkle theirs first. One thing to pay attention to though - do not use the part of the bag with the printing on it!! I was wondering why my white snowment had pink all over them once - it came from the bag!

                              Gill - When I have a dark and a light color, I do tend to sand them from the light into the dark rather than back and forth. If the paint is dry dry dry, you shouldn't have a problem though.

                              Theresa E
                              Theresa

                              http://WoodNGoods.weebly.com

                              http://woodngoods.blogspot.com

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