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  • Finishing dummy

    Okay, I've been scrolling for a year or two and have not progressed in the finishing end of this great hobby(obsession at times). I have made a variety of projects from portraits, 3-D, etc. and am still dumb when it comes to how to finish these and other items and have them actually completed. So, I have a pile of items waiting that I MUST get finished before going onto anyother projects.
    Can you great folks direct me to a previous thread or source that would get me outa this rut.
    Thanks in advance.
    Joe

  • #2
    Joe:
    There are so many finishing techniques out there, it is pretty difficult to help you out without seeing photos of what it is you want to finish.
    Can you post some pics of your unfinished projects.
    It's pretty easy to post photos, if you go to the "Message Board FAQ, Suggestions & Feedback" board, click on Rookie Questions, I've posted my method of posting pics and it's pretty easy.
    Good luck and happy scrolling
    Marsha
    LIFE'S SHORT, USE IT WELL

    Comment


    • #3
      Joe:

      This is just IMHO:

      You have a couple of choices, but first some opinions: Don't use a brush or wipe on finish. Way too much problems digging out the extra in the tight corners. Also, for almost all scroll saw work (there are exceptions, like intarsa) people admire the effort you put into cutting away all the extra wood. The wood itself is not the show piece. So, therefore, a 6 inch deep shine is a waste of effort.

      But you do have to sand the project. Some like to sand before cutting and after just clean up with hand sanding to remove any fuzzes from the cutting.

      Dip it. Boiled Linseed Oil, BLO, and all other oil based finishing products like Danish oil and walnut oil If the project is small enough, get some cheap baking dishes, and line with foil and add your finish oil, and just dip the project; hang it up to dry. May take several dips to build up finish. Be aware that full 'cure' of BLO may take up to 60 to 90 days.

      Aside: If you are married, Gold Stars are handed out for buying your wife new baking dishes, and offering to dispose of the old ones yourself. Really bad doghouse time if you use her dishes for BLO without asking. We're talking about YEARS of being reminded.

      Spray finishes. Oh boy! can you sink a few paychecks into this. First comes the Oil-Lubed compressor with 33 gal tank, then the in-line filters and hoses, then off to Homestead Finishing for a good quality small spay gun, then to modify your shop for spay finish exhaust fan system, WOW, can you spend the money on this ---

      Or you can get some spay cans of finish (Water based if you would please) at your local hardware store or big box BORG for a few dollars and spay finish that way. Don't spay too much at any time, or runs occur. Using Deft spay finish indoors during winter is not a good idea. Use a breath mask.

      At Wal-Mart, look for Krylon's clear coat "triple thick glaze". There are several others who make and sell clear 'glaze' coatings. I just like the Krylon product for it's price.

      Aside: for spray finishes, look for quick dry times which will shorten the exposure of the tacky time of the finish to dust motes. Dust motes need to be sanded off, and if you don't have any you save time.

      Phil

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      • #4
        I am much like phil on this. For fretwork, I dip the piece in Danish oil (What he says about wives and their baking dishes is true by the way). I use a cake pan. On larger fretwork pieces, I apply Danish oil with a plant misting bottle. Just a cheap one, like $1 or so. Spray the Danish oil on thoroughly, let it drip off and ooze all over the piece, especially in the frets and endgrains. Let it soak in for 5 min or so, then withcompressed air, blow through the veining to get the excess out, then, wipe off the surface. For that, I use paper toweling, because it doesnt leave no lint on the project. Then hang, prop up, or hire some fool to hold it for at least 24 hours in a well ventilated place.
        Then, spray on clear finish from aerosol can as directed on the can. I prefer Deft semi gloss wood finish, it always seems to lay on really nice, but be warned, its fumes are powerful, so good ventilation is a must.I spray on two coats, then sand with 400 grit before applying a third coat, and if im still not happy, ill sand again with 400 and spray again. For 3D stuff, I think Marsha has a pretty fool-proof method, just look at her chess pieces! For intarsia, I use a whole diffrent process, but I will let the intarsia folks post their methods, they know better then me. Good luck, I hope this helped a little. Dale
        Dale w/ yella saws

        Comment


        • #5
          Finishing Dummy

          Boiled Linseed Oil
          Where do you find this finishing liquid?

          Thanks again for the info all members!
          Joe

          Comment


          • #6
            Joe:

            You can purchase BLO at almost any of the big Home Improvement Stores, the BORG and its clones, usually near the Mineral Spirits, Lacquer thinner, and such in gallon metal cans. I can also get BLO at my local ACE hardware, DIY hardware, and my local Sherwin-Williams paint store. Many places also have BLO in quart cans also.

            By your reply, I presume you haven't used BLO, so here is some info:
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linseed_oil
            Never use "Raw" linseed oil. Well, I shouldn't say never, it is just something experts may mess around with.

            Again, only since I suspect you haven't used BLO before I add the next paragraph:

            Everyone has been told about the finishing rags in the trash can causing a fire, well it is true for BLO. Just be sure any paper towels, rags or what ever you use to clean up spills, or remove extra BLO off the project are hung up to cure for 24 hours (longer is better) or place them in a bucket of water. The rags (or paper towels) will become very stiff when dry. As the linseed oil interacts with the fibers of the rag during drying, it will heat up. If enclosed in a trash bucket the heat build up of several rags could ignite a fire.

            But I suspect everyone knows this already.

            Phil

            PS I forgot to add: For fine table top finishing, after the initial coating, the rule is apply a light coat of BLO Once a day for a week, once a week for a month, once a month for a year, once a year for life.
            Last edited by GrayBeard Phil; 07-08-2006, 08:57 AM.

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            • #7
              JoeCool, if you do not want to "pop" the grain on the wood I would stay away from BLO, as has been said it takes forever to dry. Just my 2¢ worth. Mick P-20
              Mick, - Delta P-20

              A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

              Comment


              • #8
                "pop the grain"????????? When I ever refer to that, I think of "popping" the grain as bringing out the beauty in the wood, more like an explosion of beauty, not something that is a bad thing by any means. Why would ya spend hours working on a piece of wood that you wouldnt want to show off the true beauty mother nature hid within that board? Maybe I am thinking a little diffrent here, help me out?
                I use Danish oil only because to me the smell is much more pleasant than that of BLO/MS mix (50/50 mix), and I tend to let the Danish cure for 24 to 48 hours before clearcoating.

                Why use an oil prior to your final finish? The oil gets into the veining, and frets, where the aerosol clearcoat will not get no matter how good you are at applying it, and seals the wood there. Now, someone else define YOUR interpretation of "popping" the grain please. Dale
                Dale w/ yella saws

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                • #9
                  Finishing Dummy

                  Thanks again for your infomation. I had a container of Tung oil that someone gave me as a present................so..........
                  yesterday, I tried Tung oil and found it to be quite an experience. I placed some in a shallow container and placed several of my pieces into it for a short time to coat each side and get into the veining and frets.
                  I left them drip off and then wiped them down. I left 'em dry over night. They do look nice especially the darker woods but the baltic birch doesn't seem to have changed in appearance very much. Anyway, should they be clear coated after a day or so?
                  I will try BLO next and let you know my experience.
                  Thanks again.
                  Joe

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    They dont HAVE to be clear coated, but that will give it a nice finished look, a little shine as well.
                    Dale w/ yella saws

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I agree that they don't HAVE to be clear coated but it sure does make a difference in appearance. I have seen on only a couple occasions where someone has gone to all the time and work to make a big fretwork item and used nothing but an oil finish on it. Not only does that spoil the look of it as far as most people are concerned but the oil finish acts as a dust magnet and one that is clear coated does not collect much dust and is easier cleaned when it eventually does collect some.
                      It was mentioned about the oil popping the grain. Occasionally someone will think that popping means raising the grain and it doesn't do that at all. So I like to say it enhances the grain rather than popping it.
                      I classify any of the oil formulations as something only to enhance the grain and seal the wood and that's all. For me, it's not finishhed until a clear finish of either satin, semi gloss or gloss is applied depending on the piece.
                      W.Y.
                      http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

                      The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

                      Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Dale, what I mean by "popping" the grain is what Bill said. To "pop" the grain is to enhance the grain or bring out the darker color. Most any oil finish will do this. I don't care to use BLO because of the long drying time and the odor. I agree with you on bringing out the natuaral color of the wood. Mick, P-20
                        Mick, - Delta P-20

                        A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for the clarification ick, you had me all confuzzled there for a while. Dale
                          Dale w/ yella saws

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            William Young said, "someone has gone to all the time and work to make a big fretwork item and used nothing but an oil finish on it. Not only does that spoil the look of it as far as most people are concerned "

                            Now, that's interesting you say that, because down here most of my buyers eschew any kind of gloss and want plain old oil (I use Tried and True Danish oil). I wonder if it's a regional thing? Or maybe it's because this is heavy horse and kid country? I'll have to research this

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have used a 50/50 BLO/MS mix on a lot of my projects. I dip my project and let dry for 48 hrs. I then apply 2 coats of semi-gloss poly and sand with a brown paper bag in between coats. I bought my BLO at Walmart. Do use caution as Phil stated and let your paper towels and rags dry after using Blo.
                              Bill
                              Delta P-20

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