Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dye

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dye

    I've seen some ads in the magazines about using Rit Dye on the wood.Has anyone ever tried using dye? If so,could you provide some info on the procedure, such as prepping the wood., how heavy a coat is applied.etc.What's the rule of thumb on drying time (considering variances in temperature and humidity levels) .Do you dip it or brush it? Does it bleed out? What was the mixture ratio?
    "Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it."---Thomas Paine

  • #2
    Hi 299t,
    I have tried just a few samples. My wife is a spinner, making her own yarn, and uses Rit Dye all the time. I tried a few pine pieces and it got darker. The hardwood (hickory) seemed more even but not as dark. As far as mixing, my wife made it according to package directions. She also dyes some wools with Koolaid. I can't drink it anymore.

    Tim
    "All it Takes For the Forces of EVIL to Rule Is For Enough GOOD People To DO NOTHING!"

    Saws: Excaliber 30; Dewalt 788 'Twins', Makita SJ401 (Retired), Grizzly G1012 18" Bandsaw

    Comment


    • #3
      dye

      I have used the RIT dyes. Mixed according to package and dipped parts. Needed the bright colors they produced.

      Comment


      • #4
        299t:

        There are whole books and magizine article galore about dyeing wood. Using Rit fabric dyes is only one way. Woodcraft, Rockler, and Homestead Finishing Products have a wide assortment of dyes, stains, and other wood coloring products. (Dyes and stains are different products. Most Minwax products I think are really stains,)

        Softwoods, like Pine, tend to end up with un-even color absorbtion due to the Pine resin if I recall correctly (IIRC.) Solid Poplar wood takes dyes real good.

        However, with fretwork in scroll sawing, there is the additional problem of end-grain drawing up more dye than edge grain. Fretwork has end grain everywhere mixed with edge grain. Thus where the end-grain is exposed there will be a small darker, or more intense, color area.

        As with all things with wood coloring, test, and retest, on scrap wood of same type.

        But to your questions:
        - For small items, dipping would be my choice. You need to flood the wood for a small time period, then wipe off extra with dye damp rag. Time of soaking wood should be on product package. Wood about equall to cotton.

        - If the dye is water based, it will 'raise' the grain. If you wet the wood first and very lightly sand off the 'fuzzies' the dye won't be able to raise the grain. With some detailed fret work, the project is too delicate to sand, so many use heavy brown paper bag from grocery store. Bathroom 'scrounge' pad also works also.

        - 1st few time you mess with dyes and stains, you will find you may sand thru to the dye (if you do a lot of 'between' coats sanding.) That is just a learning curve you have to get over, so expect it, and be happy if doesn't apply to you.

        Phil

        PS: Dyes are a real mess. Just be sure you have a GOOD plan on dealing with the mess, gloves, and old clothes.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have tried a few alternatives, including Rit. My experience was that it fades to a more muted color pretty quickly. It still retains the color,it just looks a little washed out. That look works for a lot of stuff. If you search around, aniline dye can be found at reasonable prices. Here is one good source:

          Luthiers Mercantile
          -Andy

          Comment


          • #6
            Mix it using alcohol instead of water to avoid grain raising.Another alternate is mineral spirits to mix the dye to avoid grain raising .
            Dale w/ yella saws

            Comment


            • #7
              Dyes are not soluble in mineral spirits!

              Comment


              • #8
                I read that Minwax is coming out with 74 new colors of stain. Some of the colors are wintersky (pale blue), lemongrass (yellow), antique jade (green), fruitpunch (orange), cherry blossom (cherry colored).

                They are called Minwax Decorator Tint Formula and are waterbased stains.

                Available at the usual locations.

                Has anyone tried these?


                cooter

                Comment


                • #9
                  Dyes

                  I made some parrot puzzles a few years ago and used rit dye. Mixed a little stronger than mfg recomendations then put the parts in large jars and let them soak . Turned out ok, nice bright colour.
                  Smitty
                  Dewalt 788

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by arbarnhart
                    I have tried a few alternatives, including Rit. My experience was that it fades to a more muted color pretty quickly. It still retains the color,it just looks a little washed out. That look works for a lot of stuff. If you search around, aniline dye can be found at reasonable prices. Here is one good source:

                    Luthiers Mercantile
                    A few additional notes...

                    My point in posting the aniline dye link is that you should make sure you really are saving money before trying alternatives.

                    The particular set of dyes I pointed at are the alcohol soluble. I like those because they don't raise the grain to a noticable degree and they dissolve in shellac (because it is mostly alcohol) for nice easy tinting finishes. But they also have water soluble.

                    I will just agree to disagree with anyone that says bright colored Rit dye stays vivid and bright on wood that spends much of any time in the light. There are times when you can use this to your advantage.
                    -Andy

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      well, i copied and sent your original question to a retired professional finisher and free lance writer of many finishing articals in many finishing magazines worldwide, Mac simmons http://www.macsimmons.com/macsnotebookindex.html this was his responses to it. .... I've seen some ads in the magazines about using Rit Dye on the wood.Has anyone ever tried using dye? If so,could you provide some info on the procedure, such as prepping the wood.,"Let me first say, professional finishers do not use Rit dyes, they use aniline dyes, or a fairly new dye that is actually made up from micronized pigments, these are better protection against fading."
                      THE WOODS MUST BE WELL SANDED, CLEAN, FREE OF ALL DUST how heavy a coat is applied.etc. DYES WORK BETTER WHEN THEY ARE SPRAYED, RATHER THEN WIPED.What's the rule of thumb on drying time (considering variances in temperature and humidity levels) WATER DYES NEED OVER NIGHT DRYING, THE ALCOHOL OR ACETONE TYPES DRY IN LESS THEN 1 HOUR..Do you dip it or brush it? YOU CAN DIP OR BRUSH, IT TAKES SOME PRACTICING, AND DEPENDS ON THE SIZE OF THE PIECES YOUR WORKING ON. Does it bleed out? ALLOW FOR COMPLETE DRYING, AND USE THE PROPER TYPE OF COATING.What was the mixture ratio? USUALLY, ONE OUNCE OF POWDER TO A QUART OF SOLVENT, CONSIDERATION MUST BE GIVING TO THE TYPE OF WOOD AND THE COLORS YOU WANT TO ACHEIVE. and as for mixing it with alcohol/ ms/ water or whatever..... "There are many dyes, you need to know the type of dye, and then know which combination of solvents go into each other.

                      If you take the dye, and mix it first in lacquer thinner, and then add some mineral spirits it will go in.

                      If you take some dyes, and add alcohol first, and then add some water, they will go into each other."

                      I hope that helped instead of confused anyone. Check out his finishing notebook some time, theres a lot of info in that notebook website. Dale
                      Dale w/ yella saws

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have not tryed those dyes. but i do use leather dye. it works great. i use them on gourds. they will fade in the sun. but with some lacquers on top they are beutfule. very deep colors. your freind Evie

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Leather dye is often, maybe even usuallly, aniline dye, but often is available in smaller quantities. It is usually much more expensive in dollars per unit, but if you only need a little bit it is cheaper than buying a bigger bottle from a woodworking shop. Plus it is in craft stores and a whole lot easier to find.
                          -Andy

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Dye

                            I read an article in Judy Gale Roberts newsletter where a fellow needed to color a rain sliker yellow for an intarsia piece and used mustard . It turned out very well, nice bright color.
                            Smitty
                            Dewalt 788

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by arbarnhart
                              Leather dye is often, maybe even usuallly, aniline dye, but often is available in smaller quantities. It is usually much more expensive in dollars per unit, but if you only need a little bit it is cheaper than buying a bigger bottle from a woodworking shop. Plus it is in craft stores and a whole lot easier to find.
                              thank you Andy. that is some good advise. I didn't know that. I have to order my leather dyses from . on line sorces. thanks. I used leather dyes on my xmas ornements. which don't have to be in the sun. and i also use them on lots of other things. I just love the deepth they give my projecks. you can also get them at shoe stores. not so much in the pretty colors though.
                              Illl try to down load some pics. if it doesn't work sorry but here goes. your friend Evie

                              Comment

                              Unconfigured Ad Widget

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              • Gary beasley
                                Reply to Cutting guide for straight cut on a scroolsaw
                                by Gary beasley
                                Cutting a straight line I get it started then plant my thumb at the side of the piece and use that to stabilize the cutting path, a bit like the pin you would use on a bandsaw when resawing old style.
                                Yesterday, 02:34 PM
                              • will8989
                                Wood supply
                                by will8989
                                We went to Groff & Groff yesterday. Purple Heart wood is stuck on a boat somewhere. They said imported exotic and hardwoods are stuck on boats. So if you see a wood you need, grab it while you can.
                                Yesterday, 09:58 AM
                              • will8989
                                Reply to My beauties
                                by will8989
                                He has 4 of the long ones, but we have other sizes that he uses for clamping up his cheese board slicers, another good seller. They go for $35, left over wood from dough board. On late shift yesterday because I took a 2 hour nap around 7. Off to the saw! I have 8 days of shows in 2 weekends! And one...
                                Yesterday, 09:49 AM
                              • RJweb
                                Reply to My beauties
                                by RJweb
                                The boards and baskets are beautiful, but maybe buy Bruce some more clamps, also I see you are on the night shift again, RJ...
                                Yesterday, 09:28 AM
                              • will8989
                                Reply to My beauties
                                by will8989
                                What Carole said. The lips are 1 1/2”, holds the board to the counter and keeps the flour from going off the back. After gluing them to the board, he drilled stainless screws through the lip into the board and made plugs to fill the holes. The board is 3/4” thick. Since he only has 4 large Bessy...
                                Yesterday, 01:20 AM
                              Working...
                              X