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  • Dip Staining question.

    Did a Dragon for a x-mas present now I need to stain it. It has got some little holes that need stain in them aswell so I thought I'd dip it. Question is,do I just dip it in for a sec. or two and just long enough for the stain to get into the holes? Do I let it sit for a bit? Once I pull it out I'll wipe off the excess but what about the holes/veins? Blow'em out? Let it dry then poke something through? Whats the proceedure for dipping? Also, if I were to spray it with some polyurethane will it also get into the holes/veins enough so as to not be too noticeable?
    Confuscious says, "The cautious seldom err".
    Confuscious didn't own a scrollsaw either.

  • #2
    well capt.Forist,I'll say this.I rarely ever stain my fretwork,I generally pick the wood suitable for the project. sometimes though,staining is the only option.To stain somthing with a bunch of tiny frets,yes,dipping is the way to go.The endgrain places will end up a little darker then the rest,but there isnt much you can do to stop that on fretwork. Sometimes though,the little bit of burnishing that the blade does as you cut seems to limit that color diffrence a bit.So yes, dip it in the stain,and slosh it around a bit,be sure no air pockets are in any veining or freat. Keep an eye on the color,and if it starts getting darker then you want,pull it out (best tried on a scrap first of course).Wipe the excess off the surface,then blow through the freat and veining to clean that out,and wipe the surfaces good again.You shouldnt need to run a rag through them.After its thoroughly dry yes,feel free to spray it with poly,the fine mist finds its way into most of the cuts.If your not comfortable with that,use a coat of danish oil,applied the same way as the stain was applied,and let that dry before spraying.That way,all your bases are covered. Sounds like somebody is getting a nice dragon under the tree!
    Dale w/ yella saws

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    • #3
      I agree and would rather not stain it but it's 2 pieces joined and the color varies. If it were 1 piece I wouldn't. Do you blow the veins with air turned down low as soon as it comes out? Apply danish before poly? What does the danish do?
      Confuscious says, "The cautious seldom err".
      Confuscious didn't own a scrollsaw either.

      Comment


      • #4
        i use about 30-50 psi pressure. If its real fragile,stay back a little bit. All you want to do is blow the excess out of the frets,it dont much. The danish helps make the grain show nicely,and it also seals the wood inside the frets and veining,where to poly can not get to. Remember,the stain is just that,a stain,not a sealer.The poly over danish,after proper dry time of course.
        Dale w/ yella saws

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        • #5
          Hey Capt:

          From other wood working I have done, the liquid stain will be sucked up in the end grain. Most fret work has end-grain EVERYWHERE.

          You might want to expermint with some sort of sanding sealer before the dip into stain. You might want to try 50-50 dip into BLO / Paint thinner mixture. Dip once, and let dry (cure) for 2 or 3 days. My guess is the BLO mixture might plug up the end grain.

          Phil

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          • #6
            Instead of using stain why not try a dye? It sort of reaches its color in brief moment and then doesn't darken after that. If you're dipping it this means you just slosh it around until it seems to have reached the whole piece then take it out, blot it on some triple-thick paper towel, and hang it up to dry.

            I'm having good results currently with "Trans-tint" ( brand name) dyes that you mix with either water or alcohol. The advantage of alcohol is that it doesn't raise the grain, and it dries really fast. I've had good results with "Trans-Fast" dydes from the same company, which are water-soluble and come in powder form. They come in more bright colors, while the Trans-tint seems to concentrate on woody tones.

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            • #7
              I do a lot of dip staining, actually tung, or danish oil and do not have a
              compressor so I use the other end of my shop vac as a blower. I keep
              forgetting that you can also use the vacuums as blowers. I have even
              used my leaf blower for larger scroll saw items.

              Whatever works ...................................


              Gary

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              • #8
                I too am in SC and like I always say "gmackay", you can't keep a good Redneck down. They'll preservere over anything and adapt to all adversity.
                I did the dragon in 1/2" oak. Dipped it today and the juries still out. I put in a pan, poured a quart of stain in and covered it for a minute. Pulled it out and wiped of excess then hung it up. Came back in 'bout 6 hrs. and it was still tacky, cold and rainy day, and had a few spots that were wet again. I wiped them off and left it. I work 24 hr. shifts so I can't check on it tomorrow and it needs to go in the mail Weds. so I'll hold my breath and hope for the best.
                Last edited by Capt Weasel; 12-08-2005, 10:57 PM.
                Confuscious says, "The cautious seldom err".
                Confuscious didn't own a scrollsaw either.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Slow drying stain

                  Capt. Weasel....don't try to dry it with a hair drier!! I made that mistake with a portrait trying to accelerate the drying process. The heat seperates the oil from the pigment in the stain and it will bead up in tiny globs on the surface of your work!!
                  If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

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                  • #10
                    I decided to bring it inside and run a string through a hole. I hung it from a coat hanger from the shower curtain rod and its drying pretty good. I may be able to attach the base to it tomorrow. Don't think I have time for some Danish oil but I'll try that on my next project,
                    Confuscious says, "The cautious seldom err".
                    Confuscious didn't own a scrollsaw either.

                    Comment

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