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  • Maple

    What would be a durable finish for maple that would preserve its color? (It's for an occassional table rather than a piece of scrollwork .) I've got tung oil, Danish oil and boiled linseed oil to hand.

    Gill
    There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
    (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

  • #2
    All 3 will put a yellow tint to it. None of the mention is a top coat and will provide no protection at all. You do not mention clear coating it for the actual protection. You can use any of the 3 mentioned and top coat with a poly or a lacquer. For a non yellow look a clear shellac with a water base poly or waterbase lacquer.
    John T.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Gill
      What would be a durable finish for maple that would preserve its color? (It's for an occassional table rather than a piece of scrollwork .) I've got tung oil, Danish oil and boiled linseed oil to hand.

      Gill
      A water base shellac or anything water base would do best. I have found that if you want to keep the grain and the white-ish look of maple is to stain it white...very light coat. I use Winter White water base, and then I sealed the piece with a Oil based varnish. Worked out great. You might may also want to try a white-wash type treatment.

      Experiment on some scrap.... whatever you decide to try.

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      • #4
        Water base shellac
        A water base shellac or anything water base
        New one on me. Never heard of shellac thinned with anything but methyl hydrate. Interesting. Got list of suppliers and some specs ?
        Fred

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        • #5
          oaklysawyer,

          My bad, I typed faster than I could think, I did mean 'lacquer.' Thanks for catching that.

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          • #6
            Many thanks for the advice, guys - water based lacquer seems to be quite readily available so I think I'll be going down that route.

            It's a good job I asked before using an oil!

            Gill
            There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
            (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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            • #7
              Just a point of info to clarify some of the info given. If you are going to whitewash with a stain wheather it is waterbase or not here I would not use waterbase but if you do as with any undercoat it will raise the grain and needs a lite sanding and make sure all dust is removed before top coating. As far as shellac goes do not use a waxed shellac you want a dewaxed shellac with water base lacquer or poly. That is important!!!! I would recomend Zinsser Bulls Eye Seal Coat. Best stuff on the market. Cleans up with denatured alcohol and is not too bad oder wise. Then if top coating with a water base lacquer sand litely before top coating and no need to sand between coats with lacquer. I like to finish sand with micro-mesh 12000 to give a nice feel and smoothe look.
              John T.

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