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  • Sanding Project

    Hello,
    I have just completed cutting out a cross pattern with a plant
    or a vine growing up the side, I got the pattern from Rick Longabaugh's
    "Scroll Saw Basics" book. The problem I am having is I sanded the outside
    of my project and the veins of the leaf are full of sawdust.
    Do I need to resaw the veins to clean out the sawdust or is there another way?
    Thanks,
    Bill
    Delta P-20

  • #2
    Bill,

    I would try the canned air used to clean cameras and computers. It comes with a tiny nozzle (like they include with cans of WD40) to concentrate the air into small places.
    Bob
    www.GrobetUSA.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Dental tape is quite good for this too - I always remove the wax first with some white spirits.

      Gill
      There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
      (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Bill:

        I am going to presume your attempts with an old 1" paint brush did not work out as you wanted, and

        I am going to presume you do not have an air compressor to blow out the saw dust. But if you have the $$$ ....

        2nd option: Your local Office supply mega store, and I think Wal-Mart in the office supply dept., carries cans of compressed air for dusting off computers. Not expensive, but sometimes store makes you buy a 6 pack.

        A third option is a visit to your local hobby store and bring $$$. There they have air brushes. The air brushes are very small paint / finishing spray devices that can have a spay pattern from 2 inch, down to as little as 1/16, inch diameter (on the expensive ones, cheaper ones smaller range). You can get cans of compressed air for air brushes. Normally used for model cars and trains. Air brushes work great blowing out dust with good control, applying finishes to fret work, and so forth. Can be used with can air or air compressor.

        Air brushes are now being sold to lots of people to spay 'instant tanning' gunk onto people's skin. Maybe the word 'Model' has a different meaning.

        Phil

        Comment


        • #5
          I use an air compressor, but if you don't have one, a vacuum cleaner is worth a try I would guess. Everybody needs an air compressor. Never thought so until I got one.

          Comment


          • #6
            Sanding first

            I have seen people sand the wood before they cut, sounds strange but I have found it minimizes sanding after.
            I also find if I place tagboard...the stuff cereal boxes are made of behind the project as I am cutting there is less feathering on the underside.
            CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
            "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
            Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by CanadianScroller
              I also find if I place tagboard...the stuff cereal boxes are made of behind the project as I am cutting there is less feathering on the underside.
              Interesting idea there, who wudda' thunk it?
              Todd

              Hawk G4, Dremel 1800

              Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

              Comment


              • #8
                Also the use of reverse teeth blades elliminates any fuzzies on the backside.

                My suggestioin for the saw dust in the kerfs is a compressor of course or next thing a vacuum and while using the vaccuum try a brush to free it up.Next time if you want you can do a retracing of your cutiing before taking the blade out of the cut.
                John T.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I always sand the wood, vacuum and wipe it down with a tack cloth before I apply the pattern and cut it. Then it just needs very little sanding before applying the finish. Mick.
                  Mick, - Delta P-20

                  A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Dental strips

                    A dental nurse friend gave me some of the old strips they used to use to clean up the old type amalgum fillings. These work exceptionally well.
                    Cheers. Teresa .

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks for all the great tips,I went out to the garage and buffed
                      my project with my dremmel, then blew it off with my canned air
                      from Walmart, I was amazed how much it showed up my mistakes.
                      I learned a lot from this project: I learned how to cut sharp corners,
                      my cuts on straight and curved lines have really improved, and I
                      finally know how to put pressure on the wood when I spin the wood
                      without chatter. I still have a lot of improving to do but this hobby
                      just became a lot more fun and makes me want to go out to my
                      saw more often now.

                      Bill
                      Delta P-20

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Bill

                        I'm really glad to hear you're enjoying your saw. Like anything that requires good hand/eye coordination, your work will continue to improve with practice. None of us hit a home run the first time at bat so to speak. The more you use the saw, the easier and more enjoyable it becomes. actually almost an addiction!!! I go into withdrawal if I can't get to my saw for a couple of days...LOL. Don't expect your work to be perfect right away. Most folks, with the exception of another scroller, won't notice minor imperfections anyway so just be your own worst critic!!! Keep at the saw, you're gonna do great!!
                        If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Neal Moore
                          Most folks, with the exception of another scroller, won't notice minor imperfections anyway so just be your own worst critic!!! Keep at the saw, you're gonna do great!!
                          As a newbie myself (6 months) I will agree totally. I started out on my saw making things you might find in a pre-historic cave, but after a short time I have the basic skills to put out a few "okay" (in comparison to the pros here) projects that have built my confidence and justified the sawdust.

                          Like Neal said it does seem to be like an addiction, I thought of that just the other day as I ate my dinner at my work bench giving my work a critique...the wife says dinner WILL be eaten at her table from now on.
                          Todd

                          Hawk G4, Dremel 1800

                          Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Todd.....you're either selling yourself short or are just too modest. I've seen some pictures of your work and think it's great!!
                            If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks for the kind words Neal, I just base my work off what I have seen from you more experienced "old duffers".
                              Todd

                              Hawk G4, Dremel 1800

                              Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

                              Comment

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