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Is regulat office tape work for burn protection?

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  • Is regulat office tape work for burn protection?

    I use clear shipping tape all the time to prevent burning when I cut. Will regular office tape do the same thing?


    Dave

  • #2
    I have used desktop type Scotch Tape successfully for that purpose. But thicker packing tapes seem to do better on thicker denser woods like Purple Heart.
    Linda at www.ArtIngrained.com

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    • #3
      I know that there are many fans of the use of packing tape to prevent burning. That said I tried and found it that it caused more problems than it solved.

      I can say I cut many woods Yellow Heart. Maple, Oak, Walnut, Paduk, Baltic Birch Plywood and Cherry. The only time that I experienced burning issues was because I tried to use too big a blade with short radius curves. That said I rarely use a blade larger than a #3.
      cwmagee
      aka Fibber
      Producer of fancy firewood​

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      • #4
        From what I can tell, it's not actually the tape that keeps things from burning. There's a light lubricant of some sort applied to the back side of the tape to keep it from sticking to itself. That lubricant helps prevent the burning. That is why you can use masking tape or packaging tape to prevent burning; I use masking tape personally.

        If you ever left a roll of masking tape in a hot shed all summer, and the tape sticks to itself so much that it's unusable, the head has driven away that light lubricant, so the tape really sticks to itself.


        Bob
        www.GrobetUSA.com

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        • #5
          I use packaging tape over the pattern and use the office tape to hold compound pieces back in place.
          Jim
          When looking at the clock at work--the correct time is:
          Too early to leave, too late to call in.

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          • #6
            Regular office tape might work, but you may be cursing it when you try to remove it. I envision it coming off in tiny little bits, instead of large chunks like thicker packing tape or masking tape.
            Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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            • #7
              I do not use clear tape except for my compound cuts. It is too easy to miss a small piece when it comes time to finish. I use either Blue painters tape on the small stuff and clear removable contact brand shelf paper on the large stuff.
              $8 for a 18" by 20 foot roll.= .0018 cents / square inch. It will probably replace the blue tape with the contact paper completely much easier to remove.
              Rolf
              RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
              Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
              Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
              And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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              • #8
                I’m sort of with Rolf. I use blue tape. When I do compound cutting I wrap the cut out piece in packing tape when I put it back in to cut other side. I buy blue tape in all the sizes. I use mostly the 3”, which isn’t really 3”. When I get to the end of the board, I’ll use a narrower width. I did read an article last week about double sided tape found in the paint (?). From what I remember it’s rather wide, maybe 10-13”. Put one side on the wood, cut to size, peel off the top protection piece and place pattern. There is room for adjusting pattern, eliminating spray glue. Have no idea what it is, but will be looking for it later today. I found with clear tape, if you have a wrinkle in the tape, Sawdust gets in the wrinkle creating while other problems.
                Last edited by will8989; 05-17-2019, 11:13 PM.
                Betty

                "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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                • #9
                  I may be wrong in my thinking, but I can’t tell much difference whether I use tape or not to prevent burning. To me it’s more speed control and size of blade I use. I try to use a blade that puts at least 3 teeth in the wood. I use clear shelf paper on the wood to glue the pattern to. One piece will usually cover the board and comes off easily when I’m done.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cut up View Post
                    I may be wrong in my thinking, but I can’t tell much difference whether I use tape or not to prevent burning. To me it’s more speed control and size of blade I use. I try to use a blade that puts at least 3 teeth in the wood. I use clear shelf paper on the wood to glue the pattern to. One piece will usually cover the board and comes off easily when I’m done.
                    I've had similar thoughts. I've used plenty of tape over the years, but lately had become more of a skeptic. However, last Christmastime I was cutting a dinosaur puzzle out of a piece of cherry, that was left over from some long ago project. That wood started to burn immediately after I put a blade to it. I changed blades. I changed speed. Nothing stopped the burning. I was cutting other puzzles out of cherry from other boards, with no problems whatsoever. I ended up putting packing tape on that piece of wood and was able to cut it normally. It changed my thinking.
                    Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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                    • #11
                      I've ocassionally used beeswax stick too. But tape works better. Don't often have this issue. But it does crop up once in awhile. Combination of all factors wood (species, density, and thickness), blade choice, saw speed, tightness of turns, and feed rate all seem to play into it and the extent we go to solve them. Whatever it takes is what scrollers do!
                      Linda at www.ArtIngrained.com

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