Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

crack in lace wood

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • crack in lace wood

    I am building a wooden box for a co worker, the top and bottom is lace wood and the sides are quarter sawn sycamore. This box is about 12"x 17" x 5", It looks like a very smalll suit case or a brief case. I planed all the wood to about 9/16". The person I am making the box for had the top laser engraved with a fancy design. The box was with the customer for a couple weeks. I now have the box back. I see there are a few cracks in the lace wood lid, none in the bottom yet. The crack seems to follow the curve of the grain. I was very surprised to see this and very disappointed. I wonder if the laser engraving had anything to do with this? And is there anyway to fill the crack with? One problem is it will be hard to sand, (but maybe not impossible) the crack being close to the engraved design. What to fill the crack with? Would super glue work? The crack may be too narrow for sawdust. Thanks for any help. I will try and post pictures if the wife will help me.

  • #2
    Very sorry about the problem. I sure would check with the one that did the laser. A laser can be very hot and if any moisture it could crack. Depending on the design, it could vary the results in the wood.
    ♥♥ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♥♥

    Comment


    • #3
      Thin CA would be my approach. I would be surprised if the Laser engraving did this, yes it is very hot but it is instant. The moisture in the cells will vaporize but being that the crack is tracking along the grain makes me suspect it was there to begin with. You have introduced lots of stress with the planing etc.
      Could you post a picture for us to see what is going on.
      Rolf
      RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
      Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
      Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
      And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

      Comment


      • #4
        I have zero experience with the laser engraving, I would not think the laser caused the crack, maybe being clamped down too tight. The wood should have been good and dry and not under stress (besides maybe clamping for engraving), I wonder if temperature extremes may have help cause cracking, Oh well, an old time wood worker friend of mind says that is the nature of wood.
        A girl from work had a dining room table made, I think of hickory and it split down the middle made loud noise while splitting. It will have to be repaired or replaced. I would think hickory would not be a good choice.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dwssr2 View Post
          I have zero experience with the laser engraving, I would not think the laser caused the crack, maybe being clamped down too tight. The wood should have been good and dry and not under stress (besides maybe clamping for engraving), I wonder if temperature extremes may have help cause cracking, Oh well, an old time wood worker friend of mind says that is the nature of wood.
          A girl from work had a dining room table made, I think of hickory and it split down the middle made loud noise while splitting. It will have to be repaired or replaced. I would think hickory would not be a good choice.
          I made an oak table for a friend about 40 years ago and about 6 months after giving it to him, it did the same thing. Loud noise while splitting. It was through the making of this table that I learned that wood moves! It was through this that I also learned about joinery, what works and what doesn't; why wood cracks on some and not on others. Expansion and contraction with humidity changes which results in cracks. Heat and cold contribute but primarily it is humidity swings combined with the inability for contraction/expansion. For me on the table, I had the oak boards glued together and then screwed into the frame work. Didn't work because I didn't allow for expansion and contraction.

          On smaller pieces, it is not usually a major problem. Veneer does not expand and contract like solid wood does. This is why plywood is usually stable - very thin layers crossed will not expand/contract like larger and or thicker pieces do. There are exceptions though. In pen making, some cross cut blanks such as oak, walnut will expand much more side to side than lengthwise. No matter how you finish it, humidity will force it to move unless the crosscut blanks are stabilized with a stabilizer liquid that solidifies.

          As to the box lid, my first thoughts were: What did they have in it? Does it have a handle on it? If it does, the weight would have caused it. If no handle, then it is the wood itself.

          One clue that I see: the crack followed the grain. Cause: pressure; expansion/contraction from humidity swings; dropping or placing something heavy on top; leaving in the car with windows rolled up and sun shining on it. Were/are there latches that hold it closed? Is there a backing on the lacewood that it is glued to?
          Cracks following the grain usually lead the cause to be from stress from one of the above and usually in a more natural environmental cause, not from dropping or weight on it, but these latter ones can.
          Hank Lee
          Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you for sharing your experience with cracking. We can all learn from what you've seen as well as the suggestions offered.
            Linda at www.ArtIngrained.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Hank you bring up some interesting points.
              Rolf
              RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
              Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
              Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
              And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

              Comment


              • #8
                image_73103.jpgbox3.JPG
                Photos of the box showing the cracks
                box2.JPG
                Last edited by dwssr2; 02-09-2018, 05:52 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for the pictures. In my opinion the laser work did not do this. I think the crack was there before and only surfaced as the wood moisture changed. Not sure what could be done fix it. What a shame it is a stunning piece. Does the crack go all the way through?
                  Rolf
                  RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                  Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                  Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                  And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I tend to agree with Rolf. Does the crack go all the way through the piece? From the picture, this looks like a surface check, which can occur when the wood has been dried improperly. Some cracks in wood occur as the tree is growing, due to environmental stresses. Sometimes these don't become obvious until too late.
                    Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The one thought I have is to mix a bunch of the Lace wood dust and mix with clue then fill the crack with it. In the past I have just rubbed the dust into the crack and the put a coat or two of finish over it without using glue. The crack should pretty much disappear.
                      Rolf
                      RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                      Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                      Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                      And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                      Comment

                      Unconfigured Ad Widget

                      Collapse

                      Latest Topics

                      Collapse

                      • Sandy Oaks
                        Reply to One For My Quiting Wife
                        Sandy Oaks
                        When people come into ArtCrafters and ask about a scroll saw, I say it is similar to a sewing machine except with small blades.
                        Today, 03:22 PM
                      • leehljp
                        Reply to Interesting Hegner Patent
                        leehljp
                        Me - also! I drove from Memphis to Dallas yesterday in heavy rain all the way. Could not use the cruise control. My leg was in a knot.

                        Having said that, I can sit still at the scroll saw for about an 30 minutes at the most before I have to move around; On the lathe, I can also stand in...
                        Today, 11:51 AM
                      • tgiro01
                        Reply to Super Max 19-38 real test.
                        tgiro01
                        I've lured a husky neighbor with the promise of a turned pen. Now we are just waiting for the d()*& rain to stop so we can get the minivan around to the back steps into the basement, and get it down stairs. All my neighbors know that, when they help me - they walk away with a priceless work of art...
                        Today, 10:47 AM
                      • Rolf
                        Reply to Super Max 19-38 real test.
                        Rolf
                        Scrappile I like that engine hoist. When we moved into this house back in 96 One of the first things I did was put a loft in the garage and provided a place to hang a chain hoist for working on my car. The roll around hoist has some advantages over my setup.
                        Today, 10:30 AM
                      • Rolf
                        Reply to Interesting Hegner Patent
                        Rolf
                        I have two variable speed controllers one is on my Digital embroidery machine(inherited from my Mom) and I also have a Rampower carver with the electronic foot pedal. The variable speed on both of those gives much more control. especially on the power carver....
                        Today, 10:22 AM
                      Working...
                      X