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  • "Walnutted" birch

    I think someone mentioned this a few weeks ago but can't remember who and can't find the thread.

    I just tried cutting a couple of puzzles out of it yesterday and for what it's worth thought I'd comment.

    From what I understand (and remember)from the guy at the woodstore it's birch which has been heated in the kiln for longer and at higher temperatures than would be normal for drying wood - does anyone know more about this process ..?

    It cuts nicely and is a similar colour to walnut. It does however smell HORRIBLE - unless you like the smell of charred wood! It also generates very black messy dust so that the planer and saw table need wiping down well after using it ..

    Dipped in BLO/mineral spirits it darkens to a rich very dark brown.

    I've attached a pic which gives and idea of the colour change after dipping ..
    Attached Files
    Ian

    Scrolling with a Dewalt 788

  • #2
    Don't know anything about it but those puzzles look real good Ian. I do like the dark brown color.
    Diane
    Dragon
    Owner of a nice 21" Excalibur
    Owner of a Dewalt 788
    PuffityDragon on AFSP

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    • #3
      Verrry interesting. Never heard of such a thing. They do look a lot like walnut. So, wouldn't it be easier to just use walnut?

      BTW, neat little puzzles. How thick is the wood?
      Mike

      Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
      www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

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      • #4
        The puzzles look good Ian!

        As for the burnt wood and anyone knowing anything about such matters it would be Jeff or Barry.

        You want to know what really stinks a shop up...try cutting an antler or some bone...whew! Man now that is some serious funk!
        Todd

        Hawk G4, Dremel 1800

        Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

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        • #5
          I hope you're wearing serious dust protection if cutting those things, Todd...there are all kinds of nasty microbes living in antler!

          My carving friend, Alfie Fishgap, has done some woodburning on an antler and he said it smelled like burning rotten hair...

          Bob
          Last edited by BobD; 03-20-2007, 12:27 PM.
          www.GrobetUSA.com

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          • #6
            I only tried it once and it is nasty! Not rotten hair nasty but nasty none the less.
            Todd

            Hawk G4, Dremel 1800

            Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

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            • #7
              Hey Bobcat...those shed antlers don't really decompose in the wild. They are, for all intents and purposes, bone. The rodents gnaw them up for the calcium content and to keep their teeth worn down. That's why sheds don't last long on the forrest floor. Squirrel teeth, for instance, grow constantly because their natural food sources tend to wear them down. I've made several knife handles from shed and harvested antlers and they do stink to high heaven when cut!!
              If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

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              • #8
                Thanks for the review Ian. I posted a link on the carmelized birch a while back but can't find it either. I remember it was cheaper than walnut (something I thought you'd like MNScroller)


                Originally posted by BobD
                I hope you're wearing serious dust protection if cutting those things, Todd...
                Shed antlers last YEARS up here on the ground.....granted the mice/screws/voles/etc chew them good and they eventually break down to fertilizer. I would believe that shed antlers break down and are chewed up quicker in warmer locals. But there are no killer microbes in the antlers..... I've got antlers hanging on my wall that are over 50 years old and they haven't decayed to nothing......which is what they would have done if there were microbes in them......
                Last edited by bearfretworks; 03-20-2007, 12:41 PM.
                ‎"Orphans are easier to ignore before you know their names. They're easier to ignore before you see their faces. It's easier to pretend they're not real before you hold them in your arms. But once you do, everything changes."

                D. Platt

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                • #9
                  Sorry...I didn't mean to come across National Enquirish...

                  I should have taken more time to reply.

                  If carving, scrolling, cutting, etc. bone or antler, since they are more porous than some woods, they can attract a differnt kind of microbe (ones that feed on calcium) that can cause respiratory problems or infections. Use the same precautions you would use when cutting or sanding some of the more exotic hardwoods, or any wood you are sensitive to. (dust collection, dust mask, etc.)

                  I was always under the impression that antlers are made of a slightly less dense material than standard bone...they grow much faster...but I stand totally corrected! I've read up on it, and see that what I wrote earlier was toally incorrect!

                  To keep from perpetuating the myth...I'm going to delete my other post! I just wanted you all to know that I'm deleting it and standing totally corrected...I'm not just deleting the post so I don't look stupid <GRIN>

                  Bob
                  www.GrobetUSA.com

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Minnesota scroller
                    Verrry interesting. Never heard of such a thing. They do look a lot like walnut. So, wouldn't it be easier to just use walnut?

                    BTW, neat little puzzles. How thick is the wood?
                    Easier, Mike, maybe but not cheaper... AFAICR it's about $1 b/f less than real walnut. .. and that piece was cheaper - a free sample ...

                    The puzzles are 3/4 inch, cut with a #7 FD SR blade.
                    Ian

                    Scrolling with a Dewalt 788

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                    • #11
                      Ian. this is very interesting to me. I have never herd of this .
                      From what I understand (and remember)from the guy at the woodstore it's birch which has been heated in the kiln for longer and at higher temperatures than would be normal for drying wood - does anyone know more about this process ..?

                      It cuts nicely and is a similar colour to walnut. It does however smell HORRIBLE - unless you like the smell of charred wood! It also generates very black messy dust so that the planer and saw table need wiping down well after using it ..

                      Birch Huh. wow. I never heard of this at all. boy ;now thats something new. you ;say. it is the same color? all the way through.? birch is so white in my aria. and now you say it cooked to a walnut brown. and you was abaul to plane it and get the same color all the way through. ??? wow. Ok so it stinks. I wonder. will it still stinck. after it is finished.? I don't know anything about this at all. but would love to learn as well. Birch is so much cheaper in my aria. than walnut . so this would be great. by the way . your cuttings are really nice , and I just love the color. thanks for sharing this. now i have to look into it. Evie

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                      • #12
                        I noticed antler mentioned in this thread. Here are two antler pens I turned a couple days ago. One modified slimline and one Cigar pen.
                        Cigar pen has a new home already.
                        I agree it does have an unusual "stink" when sawing and drilling and turning.
                        W.Y.

                        http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

                        The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

                        Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

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                        • #13
                          Bill , those are grand , for sure. Evie

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                          • #14
                            Here it is Ian......
                            http://www.scrollsawer.com/forum/woo...rials/9101.htm

                            And I noticed grand was mentioned in this thread, here is a picture of a grand piano I used to play back when I was a young whippersnapper growing up in............











                            sorry, couldn't resist.
                            ‎"Orphans are easier to ignore before you know their names. They're easier to ignore before you see their faces. It's easier to pretend they're not real before you hold them in your arms. But once you do, everything changes."

                            D. Platt

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=bearfretworks]Here it is Ian......
                              http://www.scrollsawer.com/forum/woo...rials/9101.htm
                              [QUOTE=bearfretworks]

                              Thanks Barry. Interesting - it says they use maple as well as birch to produce it.
                              I think the guy at the woodstore where I got mine says that the stuff here is produced in Quebec. I wondered - as Evie asked - whether the colour would be even right through but it seems to be OK.

                              Originally posted by bearfretworks
                              And I noticed grand was mentioned in this thread, here is a picture of a grand piano I used to play back when I was a young whippersnapper growing up in............

                              sorry, couldn't resist.
                              ROTFL - but where's the picture?
                              Ian

                              Scrolling with a Dewalt 788

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