Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How can i get this custom piece for cheap?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How can i get this custom piece for cheap?


  • #2
    An image of your design would be helpful. I can't imagine why you would want it to be 3" thick.

    You might have luck going to a local saw mill to cut something that size and 30" wide. You did not specify wood species so for this suggestion to work it would have to be something that grows locally.
    Dan

    -Just do'in the best I can every day

    Comment


    • #3
      We need more and better information on what you are trying to do. Sounds like you may need an overhead crane to move that slab, have you considered that too? Your talking about a piece of wood that could weigh 200 pounds.
      Jeff Powell

      Comment


      • #4
        That does seem to be a hefty bit of wood for a table top. I'm sure there are great reasons why you want to go with something like that...but my first thought is great protection during a standoff with the police.
        Todd

        Hawk G4, Dremel 1800

        Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Rivari
          my first thought is great protection during a standoff with the police.
          LOL my first thought was that it would take a hell of a scrollsaw to cut it ....
          Ian

          Scrolling with a Dewalt 788

          Comment


          • #6
            How about starting with old railroad ties? I don't know how much they cost in the US but they are about $40 each in the UK, retail. You could end up with a very characterful piece. Three or four ties should do it with plenty to spare for legs and bracing? I am thinking of a UK tie (sleeper) which is about 102" x 10" x 5" thick.

            Chris
            "If you march your Winter Journeys you will have your reward, so long as all you want is a penguin's egg."

            Saws: AWSF18, Meccano Mk II

            Comment


            • #7
              I don't know what they use in the UK, but here in the USA our railroad ties are soaked in creosote. That would make a big mess everytime you touch it, and I can't imagine any finish could possibly stick to it other than cold tar.
              but you are on the right path, because there's no way a slab that big will hold up as a coffee table, it would be too unstable. It would have to be glued up as a panel and even then would have to free float on top of a frame. The best you could do to permanently attach it would be one screw in the center of the board. I understand the want for a huge slab, but there is a very good reason why you never see this done.
              Jeff Powell

              Comment


              • #8
                You can find untreated ones here although looking at my post I guess the word "old" is wrong. The untreated ones are mostly new.

                http://www.justsleepers.com/price.htm is a UK site showing the sort of thing you can get over here, I would think quite a respectable price for a huge hunk of wood. Of course you need to do some work to turn that into a table but easier than having to start with a tree and a lot less expensive than more conventional timber products.

                I have a cousin in Australia with an enormous dining table - must seat 20 with ease - made out of timbers salvaged from a dock that was taken out by a storm. Huge thing, studded with iron bolts. Great fun.

                Chris
                "If you march your Winter Journeys you will have your reward, so long as all you want is a penguin's egg."

                Saws: AWSF18, Meccano Mk II

                Comment


                • #9
                  Althought I don't think this is a scroller's question, All you need to do is use some less expensive wood and plane the edges and the top. Glue them together to form your larger piece. Then find a vaneer with a fabulous pattern to cover the top and sides.

                  This is an excellant excuse to purchase a large planer for future projects. Oh, and large clamps too. Check out Grizzly.com for more info on the larger planers, and vaneering. I'm sure I'm spelling that wrong.
                  John Patrick, Bird Oasis
                  www.birdoasis.com
                  Using Dewalt DW788. Working on a new line of birdhouses and bird feeders for the store.

                  I welcome any and all ideas for bird friendly scrolling.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I hope you post a picture of that table when you get it made-- that would be one heck of a booger to move--
                    Sharon

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Why not build an oak frame, with mitred corners, that will provide the thickness you desire and mount a piece of 3/4 inch oak plywood inside and flush with the top edge of the frame. It would give the illusion of being "thick" but would still be light in weight. You would need some stringers inside the frame to provide stability and a means of attaching the legs or use another piece of construction grade ply as a bottom of the "box".
                      If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I couldnt agree more with what Neal is saying. Also, if you use veneer, remember that veneer of the same thickness and wood (but not necessarily the same figure, just same species), must be applied to the bottom side too. Not veneering both sides will make the panel unstable.
                        Jeff Powell

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You could get 3 sheets of Baltic Birch plywood 1/2" (13mm) thick and since they come in 60"x60" size, cut in half and glue the 6 panels together with some good wood glue (apply with a roller), resulting in a 30" x 60" x 3" panel as you desire ( well... maybe 30" minus a sawkerf)

                          I would suggest doing it in steps, adding one or two panel at a time and clamping with cauls.

                          That way you'll end up with the desired thickness, and will not have to worry about warping due to the cross sectional nature of Ply. Using BB ply instead of regular ply will also give you full edges (no gaps) and a nice grain surface should you not wish to veneer.

                          Regards,
                          Marcel

                          Good luck to you
                          Last edited by Marcel in Longueuil; 12-12-2006, 04:17 PM.
                          http://marleb.com
                          DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

                          NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

                          Comment

                          Unconfigured Ad Widget

                          Collapse

                          Latest Topics

                          Collapse

                          • hotshot
                            Reply to Conclusion of Hydralic Press Story
                            by hotshot
                            I'll go back and try a light emboss, my main intent here was to stand at the other side of the room and watch the pressure gauge from a distance, and see if it would go full force without leaks, so pressing through a 2/4 wasn't really the plan. A pin size leak at 10,000 psi is a very very dangerous...
                            Today, 10:21 PM
                          • Jim McDonald
                            Reply to Conclusion of Hydralic Press Story
                            by Jim McDonald
                            Glad you got repaired and I am intrigued by the embossing idea.
                            Today, 07:27 PM
                          • RJweb
                            Reply to Farmers market
                            by RJweb
                            Betty, I see you are working the night shift again, good luck on your next farmers market, RJ...
                            Today, 05:45 PM
                          • hotshot
                            Conclusion of Hydralic Press Story
                            by hotshot
                            So, before I traveled to a larger town to find a place that could help me with my hydraulic hose connection, I took the advice of one of the members here and called around to a few auto-parts stores. The stores I called didn't do that kind of thing, however they directed me to a store here in town that...
                            Today, 05:28 PM
                          • Rolf
                            Reply to My first decent furniture project - Welding and woodwork combined
                            by Rolf
                            The auto darkening helmet is a must have in my opinion, especially for the home hobby welders. if you are a pro and do it all the time maybe not.

                            Couldn't agree more Rolf. The helmet has been a game changer for me.
                            Today, 08:39 AM
                          Working...
                          X