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  • Should have asked before ordering

    I ordered 6 different types of wood because of color and dramatic grain (from exotic woods of the world). But, having them now in hand I was wondering if there is any problem(s) with these. A little late to ask but, can put note on any bad ones. Here is the list. They are all a little over an inch not just 1".

    Zebrawood 34" x 4 1/4" x 1"
    Purpleheart 48" x 5 3/4" x 1"
    Marblewood 48" x 7" x 1"
    Bocote 38" x 4" x 1"
    Shedua 48" x 5 3/4" x 1"
    Yellowheart 48" x 8" x 1"
    They sure are heavy. My primary work will be intarsia, inlays and some fretwork. Inlays will mostly be for little boxes which I just love to make.
    This is my stock until I run out (plus a little red oak from Lowes).
    I didn't order cedar because of something I read here about breathing.

    Appreciate any tips,
    Regis
    An old beginner leaping in.

    Pleased with my new EX-16.

  • #2
    Just a general statement, as I haven't worked with several of those species. Take care to wear adequate breathing protection. Tropical hardwoods can be prone to causing allergic reactions and if you haven't used them before, you won't know how you might react. Also wear long sleeves, just to minimize the amount of bare skin that comes in contact with the dust, at least until you've determined if you are sensitive.

    As you noticed, those woods are heavy, which means they will be quite hard as well. Taking a quick look at their relative Janka hardness ratings, they run from 1575 for Zebrawood to 2532 for Marblewood. By way of comparison, Red Oak measures 1290 on the Janka scale.

    This will present challenges when cutting, but nothing that shouldn't be able to be overcome with good blades and patience.

    Good luck and have fun!
    Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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    • #3
      Regis, I've worked with all of them except bocote and marblewood. I've found shedua, purpleheart and zebrawood hard to cut, but not impossible, at 3/4". They all should finish beautifully with clearcoat finishes.

      I assume, given their thickness, that you're going to be doing some re-sawing for inlay and for box bottoms and lids. I find that using the same wood for the thick and thin parts of projects works really well.

      Enjoy your haul of beautiful wood, and don't forget to post pictures of your results.
      Carole

      Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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      • #4
        Bill gave you the right answer "wear breathing protection" and long sleeves.
        Do a web search for wood toxicity you will be surprised. None of it is good for you but some is very bad. A couple of our club members (turners) got in trouble with Brazilian Rosewood. one was hospitalized with respiratory distress the other blistered everywhere he was sweating and got dust.
        Did not mean to spook you but do your homework.
        Rolf
        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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        • #5
          I can vouch for the evils of Brazilian rosewood. Several years ago I naively turned a goblet out of this material without respiratory protection. It caused a nasty sinus infection, breathing problems, and the blisters on my hands that Rolf mentioned. I didn't see a Dr., but probably should have.

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          • #6
            Be careful with yellow heart as well. One of our intarsia folks has been through about 6 months of diagnosis and treatment for a respiratory inflammation she is sure was caused by it. The problem has not resolved yet. Get a very good quality mask and wear it religiously while cutting and sanding any wood and you'll be much safer. That includes cedar which many of us use without problems because of the masks.

            Jan
            Last edited by Jan; 11-24-2011, 12:35 PM.

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            • #7
              I appreciate all the input. Even though I stuck a note on each peice as to specif hazard, I
              m taking everyones advice about mask...always now and will try to get used to long sleeves. I did put up fan with very good filter to pull fine dust out of the air..from another thread.

              Thanks again,
              Regis
              An old beginner leaping in.

              Pleased with my new EX-16.

              Comment

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