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What kind of wood?

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  • What kind of wood?

    I have a pile of wood down in the basement, I brought up a piece to cut down and mke supports for shelves. All the wood down there is brown, dirt I guess. I brought it up sanded an area and took a pic. I don't know if it is good wood or scrap wood. If anyone knows... Thanks


  • #2
    Depends on what you want to use it for. If appearance doesn't matter, and it's flat and dry, then use whatever you have. If it's warped, curved, wet, moldy, splintered, then it probably should be tossed.

    I'm assuming that the piece you sanded is not plywood, but that would be my guess from the wildness of the grain. I've never seen that type of grain on regular wood.
    Carole

    Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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    • #3
      2x4

      I ts like a a 2 by 4, most of the rest of the wood in the basement is 6 or 8" by 2. The wood is nice and straight and you won't see it so I'm going to cut it up! Thanks

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      • #4
        Ocean waves, the sky, sand dunes, clouds, could be anything in a pattern. Way cool neato. Don't have clue what the wood is but is visually high impact.
        Got Moose?

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        • #5
          JoAnne,

          I believe the wood is Hem-Fir. I couldn't find an online pic, but here's some info:

          Hem-Fir

          In sanding this wood you will find it sands different across the grains. (The softer parts will sand down before the harder parts.)

          This wood is used in construction a lot.

          This is my opinion only and I reserve the right to be wrong!

          Karl
          Karl in Sunny Southwest Florida

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          • #6
            I was going to guess Fir, due to the grain of the wood.
            "Still Montana Mike"

            "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
            Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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            • #7
              The "hem" part of "Hem-Fir" probably stands for Hemlock. At lumberyards they will often combine the name when they don't really care (or know) which type of tree the lumber actually comes from. So, Hem-Fir will be either Hemlock or Fir. SPF lumber is either Spruce, Pine, or Fir. In construction it doesn't matter as much what the actual tree the lumber came from.
              T
              Theresa

              http://WoodNGoods.weebly.com

              http://woodngoods.blogspot.com

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