Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Where can I find laminated MDF?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Where can I find laminated MDF?

    I saw a guy that made stand-up puzzles out of 1/2" laminated MDF. These puzzles look great. I tried doing a search but cannot find any info on it. Is it called something else?
    Dan H

    I would rather be friendly to a stranger than be a stranger to my friends.

  • #2
    Was it white in color? If so I think that is called melamine and Lowes and HD have it.
    "Still Montana Mike"

    "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
    Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

    Comment


    • #3
      I believe it was an oak veneer.
      Dan H

      I would rather be friendly to a stranger than be a stranger to my friends.

      Comment


      • #4
        I would still check your local big box store. Melamine comes in different colors typically white though for shelving.
        "Still Montana Mike"

        "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
        Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

        Comment


        • #5
          I have a question about MDF. Define it. I always thought it to be sawdust & glue to whatever thickness & length. Not the laminated shelf , Melamine etc. I have seen plain MDF, just wood shelving material, the white shelving, & the sheets which are a laminate too. So, which is it ?? MDF , DUH !
          PERK

          Comment


          • #6
            MDF Aja medium density fiberboard is the wood. You can laminate it with melamine or laminate to make it into countertops, shelving ect.
            Cedarguy

            Comment


            • #7
              I agree with you Perk...my understanding is that MDF is the actual engineered wood/board. I do not consider it MDF if it has been laminated for shelving purposes, i.e. sold as shelving and not MDF. However, most of the laminated shelving is not actually MDF but particle board...IMHO a lot lesser product! I think people use the name MDF for a lot of engineered woods/products that actually are something else. So I would be cautious unless you can get the supplier to verify that the shelving material is constructed with MDF and NOT particle board.

              These shelving products can be found at most lumber stores, not in the wood section but in shelving or organization sections. Hope that helps and good luck with your project!
              ~ Kim

              A day in my shop is like a day at the beach...full of sunshine and ya never know where the sawdust may end up!

              www.gonecoastalart.com

              Comment


              • #8
                There is a difference between MDF and particleboard

                Here in Australia, many people cannot tell the difference between MDF, and Particle board, therefore I think that I can safely assume that THAT is a common problem the world over.
                Particle board is really quite easy to recognize,- Simply look at the edges of the sheet. You will notice it is constructed of actual particles, or chips of timber, ( usually Radiata pine here in Aust ), or some other similar common softwood in your country.
                MDF, ( Medium Density Fiberboard on the other hand is made from Sawdust and thinned-down woodglue, both of which are placed in a very high-pressure press,( about a 1,000 tons per sq.inch of pressure, or something like that), then it goes into a drying chamber, then out onto the factory floor where it is cut to size, etc.( Correct me if I am wrong here with the process, or have left a bit out ).
                Particle Board, ( also called, " Chipboard, " ) is not very strong in thicknesses under 1/2" thickness, while MDF is much stronger even in sheets down to 1/4" thickness, although BOTH are not very strong on end joints as both have a tendancy to split on the end, and the thinner the material, the worse the problem.
                Both are readily available in a variety of surface finishes, which range from the plain
                finish, to Melamine; Laminate, Timber veneer, etc., depending on the manufacturer, and the product popularity in country of manufacturer.

                Hope the above information makes sense to you, and is of some help,

                Comment

                Unconfigured Ad Widget

                Collapse

                Latest Topics

                Collapse

                • will8989
                  Reply to Farmers market
                  by will8989
                  I just used different wood scraps I had to make the kayaks. I still do t see anymore in my future.
                  Today, 01:09 AM
                • Jim McDonald
                  Reply to Delta Q3 fuse question
                  by Jim McDonald
                  Twenty years in electronics retail and here is a quick dirty way to tell the difference:
                  a fast blow will only have the wire element. Slow blow almost always has some extra structure that will be left behind after the fuse blows.
                  Secondly, there is a series of three letter engraved on one...
                  Yesterday, 08:54 PM
                • Ennobee
                  Reply to Looking For Mom and Baby Animal Pattern
                  by Ennobee
                  They look like David Spielmann's Designs to me. I will check my library this evening, but I bet you already that they are from one of his pattern books.
                  Yesterday, 01:55 PM
                • jim_mex
                  Reply to My first decent furniture project - Welding and woodwork combined
                  by jim_mex
                  Thanks all - you folks do wonders for my ego with your comments and importantly fire me up to keep trying new things

                  Scott - once this Covid situation has passed I'll definitely be heading up to NC. I'm tentatively thinking late spring/early summer next year. I am not sure just what pointers...
                  Yesterday, 01:35 PM
                • JustLarry
                  Reply to Delta Q3 fuse question
                  by JustLarry
                  I found this information on fuses in general.

                  Blowing type. Fast-blow fuses will blow as soon as the current reaches the fuse's amperage rating, while slow-blow fuses are designed to tolerate a large number of startup surges and modest short-term overloads without blowing.
                  Fast-blow...
                  Yesterday, 12:56 PM
                Working...
                X