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  • Wood Swap

    I just had the thought that maybe some of our members would be interested in trading wood. Possibly wood that is difficult to obtain in Australia, for instance, would be readily available here in the U.S. and vice versa. It might not be a practical idea but I thought I'd throw it up here for comments. Shipping costs might be prohibitive....I haven't investigated that yet. I sent an eleven pound package to Iraq to my girlfriends son Friday and it cost $14.30 US. Not too bad. Those interested please comment and maybe we can work it out. The actual trades would be handled by email or PM's so the message board wouldn't get cluttered up. Maybe we could post a "Sticky" so folks could indicate what species and dimensions they have ready access to??
    If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

  • #2
    I kind of liked that idea neal. However, I also know shipping is quite expensive to some parts of the world. I do know a 30 pound box to AUS will run you upwards of $50 to send, and will take up to six weeks to arrive there.Add airmail fees to speed it up and you would never afford it.You wouldnt think a few pieces of wood could cost so much to ship, but it does.And, for them sending wood here, I know the price of wood over there is much higher then it is for us,and the dollar exchange rate and all, I think someone would feel short changed in the deal, and might just end up causing friction among the group. I would suggest this is best done on an individual to individual basis. For example, if that little flower in New zealand were to want a piece or two of red oak, and would contact me asking for some, I would gladly send her a few pieces to enjoy, providing she in turn would send me a little bit of her native wood (or even a batch of her homemade cookies! [minus the haka's that is]) After you get to know the names in here, and chat back and forth a little bit, you would be far more comfortable dropping a package in the mail, knowing that it will be enjoyed, and most of all, appreciated. Some in the ornament swap declined because of the shipping costs, so I imagine that would still hold true. I have sent packages to a few people in other countries ,all with great results, but I also was confident that it would bring a big smile to a well deserving face, without any disappointment. I'm not trying to discourage the wood swapping at all,and you know you could count me in, but I do think doing that on a one to one basis is safer for everyone.
    Dale w/ yella saws

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    • #3
      You have to be careful about agricultural regulations also. Wood is a harvested product and can have bugs, molds, etc, that they don't want transported.
      -Andy

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      • #4
        Well..... bad idea!!!! What could you expect from a West Virginian??? However,..if some of you folks across the pond need some poplar we'll see how it goes. If it's too expensive to make it worthwhile we'll just not do it. But I still want to try!!!
        If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

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        • #5
          The idea is good, and your intentions are great, I'm all for it if, like you said, the shipping costs arent too overwhelming. Dale
          Dale w/ yella saws

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          • #6
            No, it was a great idea Neal. I'd have "signed up" but the only wood we have up here in the frozen north is good for firewood and making paper...
            ‎"Orphans are easier to ignore before you know their names. They're easier to ignore before you see their faces. It's easier to pretend they're not real before you hold them in your arms. But once you do, everything changes."

            D. Platt

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            • #7
              I have to agree with the general line of transporting costs. Also NZ is pretty tough on the what enters the country. And if even the slightest bit of bark is found on a piece it is almost certain rubbish bin fodder for the pieces and tears for the expecting recipient. Having said that a beautiful ornament did arrived here safe and sound, encased in some nice red oak, having not been unwrapped. I guess it's just a matter of how the declaration on the package is worded. (I wonder if the sender has a requirement for some pretty pieces like on the ornament I sent? Might travel better than cookies and gauranteed not tainted with that H word. Sorry folks, private joke).

              We do have a good range of timbers here and is quite readily available for those who want to go out and get it. Our guild have a chainsaw day once a year where a farmer will drop a good size macrocarpa or something and make it a free for all. A couple of weeks ago they milled up a very dark walnut.

              My hubby has several chainsaws plus an alaskan chainsaw mill and is often out and about doing his collecting act like a squirrel gathering his nuts up for the winter. (Imagine a squirrel with a big storeroom, lol) Palmerston North is a very pretty city with many streets lined with trees, many of them elms. Needless to say there is always the odd tree coming down during a good blow which is gernerally followed by the tree felling guys at the council letting Trev know what's come down hence he get firsts nibs at that too.

              However there are now restrictions on our native Rimu and Kauri which are the most sought after timbers. (Make anything with those woods and it will sell.) It's mostly now a matter of having to purchase Rimu, Kauri or other natives through the lumber yards or privately through someone with a sustainable milling licence.

              But then we have some funny laws. If one has a milling licence and you put any type of mill over any native log, it has to be recorded as part of the person's quota. However if that same person cut it up without a mill, like just chainsaw cutting it as if for turning blanks as an example, this does not need to be recorded. (Some info we have just found out from a guy with a licence.) Crazy uh! Needless to say we don't have a milling licence!

              Then there are other laws about tress over certain sizes where one is meant to obtain a resource consent. Very confusing!!
              Cheers. Teresa .

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              • #8
                Teresa-- Your country sounds like they are protecting not only your forest but the wild life that depends upon them-- to me it seems they have a smart thing going - maybe if the other countries would follow we wouldn't be stripping our beautiful planet of what God intended , instead we are so free reigned that we have stripped our earth of its most valuable assets..
                I personally wish all the countries were more like yours on regulations like that.
                Sharon

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                • #9
                  A couple of decades ago it was fashionable for gardeners here to import a bracken from New Zealand with wonderfully wide foliage. Unfortunately, the bracken has since broken out of the domestic gardens and is now rampant in our woodlands, killing off our traditional undergrowth and choking young plants. It also attracts blood-sucking insects which give nasty bites and cause some people (including me) painful allergic reactions.

                  I reckon the Kiwis might have such stringent regulations because they're worried that the Brits might be cultivating a revenge triffid, ready to export back!

                  Gill
                  There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                  (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Gill
                    I reckon the Kiwis might have such stringent regulations because they're worried that the Brits might be cultivating a revenge triffid, ready to export back!

                    Gill
                    I wonder how many people saw the Triffid movie? When is the next meteor shower anyway?
                    Now worries Gill, they are surrounded by saltwater :P

                    I do like the idea of a wood swap. I am not sure logistically how it would work.
                    I have some 1/4 to 3/8 clear cedar in 8 x 24 boards I am willing to part with.
                    CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
                    "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
                    Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

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                    • #11
                      Well, for those in reasonable shipping distance and without overly restrictive gov't regulations, it would still work. I'd be game. I have Red Mahogany and Walnut in various sizes that I could part with for??? The red mahogany is smallish (typ ~ 3" wide) but thick. Walnut is standard stuff, 6 - 8" wide. I can resaw and plane.

                      Kevin
                      Kevin
                      Scrollsaw Patterns Online
                      Making holes in wood with an EX-30, Craftsman 16" VS, Dremel 1680 and 1671

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                      • #12
                        I've got nearly unlimited access to small pieces of oak, cherry and maple. Most are at least 4/4, some are 8/4. Most are around 3" wide by 6" long (grain running length wise). So if you need some in those sizes, let me know!!!

                        I also have a great source for Black Cherry, but it may take me some time to get to it (my dad has 180 acres of black cherry forest in NW Pennsylvanis)

                        Bob
                        www.GrobetUSA.com

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                        • #13
                          I am looking for a drooling icon for that black cherry Bob but I cant find one.
                          CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
                          "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
                          Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

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                          • #14
                            Gill, Didn't you know the plan was to get you guys so hooked that you'd take the lot!!! Unfortunately it didn't quite work like that. LOL.
                            Cheers. Teresa .

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                            • #15
                              I have seen this idea come and go on other boards. The problems are that it is limited by practicality to North America and we pretty much all have (or have reasonable access to) the "standard" hardwoods and want the more exotic. Sure, I have some poplar to trade for koa - any takers?

                              -Andy

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