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  • 45° drilling guide

    As I'm constantly making "Bowls-from-boards" I'm always having to drill holes at a 45° angle. I've made a couple of jigs,with limited success, but they are far from perfect. I have seen jigs & guides on the web (some thing like this - https://www.amazon.com/ANGLE-DRILL-G.../dp/B006ZBCS1M ), but I wonder if they are more gadgets that work sometimes.

    Has anyone used anything like this, and, if so what are your recommendations? Or, is there a made jig that you have used with good success?

    I have some angle jigs that work very well, but, when you're drilling 35° or more, they fail.

    Any good recommendations?
    Tony

    My Son-in-law said "Darnit, I cut this board twice, now. And it's still too short."

  • #2
    Tony, why always at a 45 degree angle? Stacked ring bowls can be made at any angle, or at a variety of angles to create curved sides. Is there some limitation of the lathe that prevents this?

    I’ve always used the simple angle guide that I first saw in an old Gary McKay article in SSWC, with a rotary tool. I have a separate guide for every angle I need. The main problem is that I use a #56 drill bit, which is only 1-3/4” long, so all I can do is start the hole, go about 1/4”, then pull the guide away. The results are amazingly good, as the bit keeps going at the drilled angle.

    However, if you’re using thicker wood, this wouldn’t be feasible unless you could get a longer bit in the size you need. But a simple jig might be perfectly adequate if you can adapt it to the thickness of the wood you’re using.

    Given that I don’t turn, I realize that I might be totally off the mark, but maybe there’s something in what I’ve mentioned that you can use or adapt.



    Carole

    Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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    • #3
      Carole, if you do a Google search for long drill bits there are lots available. This one is 6" long.
      https://www.zoro.com/chicago-latrobe...86/i/G1823153/

      Tony I have an idea for an adjustable jig. If I get a chance I will draw it up. I drill all of my holes on the drill press. It is too easy to snap the small drill bits doing it by hand. Currently I have made angle blocks, pieces of 2 x 4 , to support the piece at the proper angle. I also use an icepick to make a tiny starter dimple.
      Rolf
      RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
      Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
      Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
      And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

      Comment


      • #4
        What are the typical angles that you use? 5 degree increments, 10?
        Rolf
        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

        Comment


        • #5
          Two other options, both require a drill press.
          1. Put a 45 degree wedge, or whatever your angle, under the piece and drill straight down.
          2. Many drill press tables have the ability to tilt right or left. For such a steep angle you would need to clamp the wood to the table it but it can be done.
          Scott
          Creator of fine designer sawdust.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NC Scroller View Post
            Two other options, both require a drill press.
            1. Put a 45 degree wedge, or whatever your angle, under the piece and drill straight down.
            2. Many drill press tables have the ability to tilt right or left. For such a steep angle you would need to clamp the wood to the table it but it can be done.
            One of my "works most times" is a 45° angle jig for my drill press. biggest problem there is the small drill bits. Sometimes the chuck hits wood before the hole is complete,
            Tony

            My Son-in-law said "Darnit, I cut this board twice, now. And it's still too short."

            Comment


            • #7
              Rolf, I use a hole starter that was my father’s.
              Betty

              "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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              • #8
                Tony, although there are 6" drill bits in wire sizes (see Rolf's post) which should be sufficiently long for your needs, I wonder about runout.

                Several years ago, Dave Van Ess created a small drilling guide that could be used with a Dremel (much easier to use than a hand-held drill) that had the angled channel drilled inside a small block. While it was very secure and accurate, it did require a longer bit, so I never went that route.

                I'm assuming that your stock is probably 1" thick, and the rings also 1" wide, since you're drilling at a 45˚ angle. With so much extra wood to play with, I doubt that spot-on accuracy is critical. Over the years, I've changed my go-to ring width from 1/4" to 5/16" to buy a little extra wood for sanding, and have seldom had a problem.

                I'm glad that you're not using a band saw and cutting into the ring. Saves the bother of drilling, but leaves you with a permanent vertical scar on each ring. I see that too often with turners who use the "bowl from a board" method. BTW, I hate that term! Since there's no equivalent "bowl from a block", it relegates stacked ring bowls to a second tier status.
                Carole

                Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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                • #9
                  I'll respond to many here ---

                  Carol, I don't just use 45° but it is the most common angle for some of my "BFB" bowls (sorry). A lot of folks seem to like those flat sided Vee-shaped bowls, specially the tornado bowls. I do use other angles when cutting some bowls and there is no limit, that I know of as far as the lathe is concerned. Usually, when I'm turning something besides a "BFB", I'll do segmented cutting.

                  My stock can be anything from 3/16" to 3/4" thickness. I use Dave's angle finder on Scrollmainia to determine the best angle to cut a bowl - usually 45° but I'll use anything between 30 - 45 degrees.

                  Rolf - Thanks for the link. I try to stay with 5° increments, but it doesn't always work - see my comment about Dave's angle finder.

                  I have a jig I use on my drill press (DP) that works mostly - see the pic. It's cut for 45°. The reason I asked the question, in the first place, was that I saw the gadget on Amazon, and found a few more. Over at the Village, a couple of folks suggested one that is used with a Dremmel. It's made for guitar work, but I may give it a try. No one has recommended any of the other gadgets, so I'll probably discard those ideas.
                  Attached Files
                  Tony

                  My Son-in-law said "Darnit, I cut this board twice, now. And it's still too short."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Tony, I assume that "tornado" bowls are another name for dizzy bowls, and the vortex shape is perfect for them. I didn't realize that you use thin wood for your turning--I didn't know you can go as thin as 3/16". How in the world can you remove the blade entry holes? I draw the line at 1/4" stock, and even there . . . .

                    Regarding the jig shown in the photos of the above post, I see that you use a Wixie to determine the angle for the piece that supports the blank, but do you also check that the drill bit and drill press table are dead-on perpendicular in that orientation? The floor of my garage slopes slightly downward towards the entrance, so I always zero out the Wixie so that the tool (drill press, scroll saw, belt sander, band saw) is internally consistent. Especially with double bevel inlay, where fractions matter, I get crazy-obsessive about setting it up just right.
                    Carole

                    Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Some useless information, this discussion has brought back some memories. When I was an "apprentice" in a machine shop one of my jobs was to drill a 4" deep hole into cast iron pistons The drill bit was 1/16. Cast iron is a weird stuff to drill it always sounds like the drill is breaking.
                      Rolf
                      RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                      Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                      Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                      And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Carole -

                        When I'm making rings from 3/16" or 14" board, I drill with a #57 bit and use a #3 blade to cut the rings. I'll, also, add 1/16" inch between the inner and outer diameter of each ring to accommodate drilling holes.

                        The other trick is to cut half rings (180° arcs) out of prepared boards and then glue the arcs together to make rings. This works well on tornado (dizzy) bowls, as each ring is offset 1/2 segment from it's ajoining rings to provide strength.

                        BTW - a note I thought of from another thread about cutting angles - If you really want to experience vibration when cutting 45° angles, use an FD UR blade. The alternate reversed teeth on that blade will make your board want to really dance.
                        Tony

                        My Son-in-law said "Darnit, I cut this board twice, now. And it's still too short."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tgiro01 View Post
                          Carole -


                          BTW - a note I thought of from another thread about cutting angles - If you really want to experience vibration when cutting 45° angles, use an FD UR blade. The alternate reversed teeth on that blade will make your board want to really dance.
                          I have a lot of different blades as many of us do, and we will all at some point find the ones that work best for us. The FD UR blade is one I have never gotten comfortable with for exactly the reason you mention.
                          Rolf
                          RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                          Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                          Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                          And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Something not mentioned yet and quite handy for regular "angle" drilling is a radial drill press. I had a bench top drill press for about 20 years and gave it to my grandson who is a woodworker.

                            The major advantage of a radial drill press is that the head can be set to an angle and the object being drilled stays level/flat on a level/flat table.

                            The disadvantage of a radial drill press is if one is looking for precision drilling in metal. The same problem can crop up in wood but it is more of a technique problem than drill press quality. Because of the long reach of the head, the drill press extension head can flex if drilling is rushed or forced with 1/4" and larger bits. But it does great if the drill bit does the cutting without forcing.

                            https://www.grizzly.com/products/gri...ll-press/g7945
                            That link takes you to a Grizzly BenchTop.

                            Do a search on Grizzly for "Radial Drill presses" and you will get the whole list.

                            It would only be helpful to you if you do this on a regular basis. I think in the link, there are several models - floor and bench top; Shop Fox and Grizzly. I think Jet makes one also, and maybe others,
                            Last edited by leehljp; 05-03-2021, 09:50 AM.
                            Hank Lee
                            Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted.

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                            • #15
                              I have been SLOWLY purging / cleaning up my workshop. Not an easy task for me. I came across this small bench top Workmate that I inherited from my father. It will be perfect for doing relief carving and it may be useful for drilling angled holes also. I will post after I try it. I was starting to design something like this. benchtop workmate.jpg
                              Rolf
                              RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                              Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                              Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                              And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                              Comment

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