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  • Planer and jointer opinions wanted

    My 18 year old benchtop planer bit the dust, and replacement parts are unavailable and honestly it was my first planer and would cost more to repair then what it cost to buy it. So....I'm in the market for a new (til now, underappreciated) "toy". I say "toy" because it makes a new purchase less painful. What is painful is reading all the reviews and figuring out which ones are real and which ones are sponsored. And my local wood store threw in the whole "maybe you should consider a jointer too. After exploring that piece of equipment I can see it would have definite advantages. Everyone has preferred brands on their equipment, but I'm open to hearing who recommends what based on their experience....and probably more importantly red flags to watch out for. And opinions on jointers too since I've never had one. Argh. I currently have a (dead) 13" planer, and would not want to go below 12" wide. It had 2 straight knives which worked ok, but I've read helical style carbide cutters are awesome but really expensive. Woodworking: mostly intarsia and fretwork on varying thicknesses and types of wood, though I've made some of our furniture, window valences, etc. Average planer use of 2 hours a week. I would like to enjoy using it, not dread it. Thoughts on a planer as well as a jointer please.
    Last edited by Linda In Phoenix; 09-28-2020, 08:06 PM.
    Linda at www.ArtIngrained.com

  • #2
    I have the DW735 and very pleased with it. This is a very widely used model and most very happy with it. The one complaint is that it is very loud.

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    • #3
      We have a Delta 121/2” which we’ve had forever and ever. Bruce uses it mostly, but he did change the blades to 3 cutters. It does a much better job. He also has a jig, of course he does, that he sharpens the cutters with. He also made a longer bed for it. Extremely loud. We have a jointer that seldom gets used but you would probably use it more than us. When I need a straight edge Bruce just cuts it on the tablesaw for me.
      Betty

      "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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      • #4
        On the issue of a jointer, I have had 1 but would not get another. I can get a better job on an edge with a router and straight edge. If you want one for flattening a board then they are useful.
        Now for the planer, Have wore out a couple planers. My friend bought the new one with the helical head. What a difference!! Much better cut requiring less power due to it's multiple chips vs 1 big one with a straight cutter. Much cheaper and easier to replace a blade. I would not hesitate to get one if I was in the market. I know they are expensive but IMHO well worth the extra money.
        The only thing they do not correct is the snipe on some boards which is usually taken care of with a setup adjustment.

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        • #5
          I am anxiously waiting for even more input from people. This is helpful majorly, as I know none of you are trying to "sell" me something. Just honest opinions. On the jointer, the utube videos and guy at the store indicated they would be great for helping with twisted or cupped boards to preflatten one side before hitting the planer. Occasionally I would love a good clean edge to glue up a couple boards. But hearing from people who actually understand what intarsia and fret are is awesome. More please!!
          Linda at www.ArtIngrained.com

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          • #6
            I have been woodworking a long time and do not have a jointer. I know some swear by them but not me. I have built a lot of furniture without one.

            I have a 3 hp 15" planer, the DW735 and a drum sander. I only use the big planer when I getting rough sawn wood ready for a project. The DW735 does the majority of my work. The drum sander has been great for thinner woods.

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            • #7
              Linda this has been my experience. I have had the Dewalt 15 years, Jointer 8 years, super max 6 years

              I have the Dewalt 735 planer, a six inch Jet Jointer JJ 6 CSX and the Supermax 19-38 drum sander.

              The Dewalt is an excellent machine if it had a helical cutter head it would be perfect.
              When I first bought the Dewalt planer I used it constantly to make my thin woods, but getting down to 1/8 was always a bit risky without making some form of sled to support the wood. You should also never plane anything shorter than 12". It is very easy to change the blades and the are two sided. Planing things like curly maple can be devastating, that is where I think the helical cutter would be better. I have had the softer bits chunk out. What you have read about using a jointer to flaten one side of a warped board is correct. The planer will not do that.
              I do a fair amount of edge joining boards so the Jointer was a must for me. I am very pleased with the Jet, but as with all tools they need to be properly setup. The 6 inch has been sufficient for my needs.

              A good friend bought a Grizzly 8 inch, a new model, it weighs a ton and is a beast. He told me that it vibrates like crazy, being skeptical I went and looked at it. And it really did vibrate like crazy solid to the floor and level. We took the belt off and the motor was quiet and smooth, we went through the entire machine, nothing obvious. Grizzly sent him a new cutter head, no change, he bought the helical head from Grizzly only to find out that it would not fit. The support from Grizzly was horrible to say the least. I have to contact him to find out what the status is now. I have not seen him since March. Need les to say I am not a fan of Grizzly, I am sure I will get alternative feedback on that comment.

              The Super max drum sander, see Carole's writeup in the winter issue. I re-saw my wood when I need thin stock If I have a lot and longer pieces 1/4 or above It will go through my planer. any thing else will go through the drum sander. I have reclaimed lots of wood starting with 80 grit up to 220. I do lots of small pieces (4 in)
              Since most of my ornaments are 1.5 mm (1/16) BB, I used to cut the blanks then pre sand each 4x4 square on the Sand flee. I now cut a long 4" strip and run it through the drum sander with 220. It saves me a ton of time.

              Final note on both the Planer and the drum sander I highly recommend adding the digital readout. I bought the readout for the planer from Wixey directly http://www.wixey.com/
              Rolf
              RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
              Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
              Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
              And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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              • #8
                Our super max has been making a noise that sounds like paper caught but we can’t pinpoint anything. Cleaned what we could, Bruce used dry lubricant, which sounds like an oxymoron to me, and still makes the noise. Started quietly now is louder. Any suggestions before we call for warranty work? I’m thinking bearing.
                Bruce finds which side of the board is twisted, puts tape under until it sits flat and planes opposite side. When that side is flat, he flips and planes other side. Anything really wonky or twisted gets tossed. When I used the jointer, it kicked back one time into the palm of my hand. Guess the piece was too short. Haven’t used it since.

                Breaks over! Back to work.
                Betty

                "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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                • #9
                  Well, this topic can present a lot of opinions and options. First, if you are seriously considering helical cutting heads, would you take the next step and upgrade to a stationary, floor model planer? Perhaps even a used one. I don't know how much space you have and what your shop power options are, but from things I've read, that is where you will get the most bang for your buck. Helical cutters are a revolution in planer blades. They are best if you are working with a lot of figured wood or very dense wood, otherwise the cost can be prohibitive.

                  If a large floor model planer isn't a practical option, the DeWalt benchtop planers do get good reviews. I have a 734, but most people will say that the 735 is a worthwhile step up.

                  I don't have a jointer. I've flattened plenty of boards by starting with a hand plane and finishing up with my planer. It takes a little effort and careful set-up, but it is possible to flatten a board with a planer instead of a jointer.
                  Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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                  • #10
                    Betty is the feed belt centered? Do you hear it when the drum is spinning or when just the feed belt is on?
                    I have had the sanding belt stretch, they do that over time, and there was enough hanging out to just kiss the table.
                    Rolf
                    RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                    Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                    Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                    And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Our feed belt keeps moving but Bruce did adjust it the other day when I was done and this is the first time I’ve used it. It kept getting louder so I bet that’s it or it just isn’t tight. Will check it in the morning. Thanks.
                      Betty

                      "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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                      • #12
                        I went back to my manual the last time I did maintenance and realized that I had the belt too tight.
                        Rolf
                        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Good idea, but not problem. It makes the noise when the bed isn't turning. Seems to be getting louder. He's going to call them. We need them to come check it out as there's no way to get it to them. Should be interesting.
                          Betty

                          "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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                          • #14
                            Linda I would opt for both .... one can salvage a lot of timber from offcuts and breaking down rough timber is easier when you can straighten one side on the jointer first.

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                            • #15
                              Betty, with no paper on the drum and you turn the drum by hand does it still do it?
                              Rolf
                              RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                              Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                              Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                              And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                              Comment

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