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  • Hegner saw

    Alas!....My Scroll saw has suddenly stopped working.

    I have tried all the obvious things, like loose connections, fuse e.t.c. all to no avail.

    I suspect it might be the switch, but the guy from Hegner tells me that the saw would run irregular or erratic, could it be the capacitor?
    no, because it would start up if the tension was taken off the blade, I have tried that still no joy, could it be the motor? I don't know,
    I thought if that was the trouble the motor would have given off some sort of noise or smell, the thing is just dead.

    The multicut 2S is an expensive machine, and I have only ever owned an Hegner, so I have nothing to compare.
    I'm wondering if Hegner is over rated, and does anyone know of a cheaper machine that will give good results.
    I don't want to really part with my Hegner depends on how much it will cost for a new motor, if that is the trouble.
    I have looked at the parts list, and it shows the motor and variable speed box as one unit.
    If the motor is going to prove too expensive, maybe I will go for a cheaper saw.

    Has anyone on the forum experienced this sort of problem before?

    Harry.

  • #2
    Harry,


    I am not a Hegner owner nor am I knowledgeable of the electrical internals of the Hegner scroll saw. That said, I question the advice about the switch only causing erratic behavior. If the switch is intermittent, yes that could cause erratic behavior, however the switch could fail completely which sounds more like your problem.

    I had a Dewalt scroll saw which had an internal switch that became became intermittent and eventually failed altogether.I eliminated the internal switch completely and used a foot switch.

    1 Are you using a foot switch? If yes unplug the saw and plug in a lamp or other electrical appliance into the outlet If appliance works then it is an issue with the saw.

    If switch is internal to saw, I would jump the switch out and test operate the saw.

    Make certain that the power cord is disconnected then open up the switch housing. You should find one leg of the power cord that is wired to the switch, the other wire to the switch should go to the saw motor. If you place a jumper between the two wires on the switch and plug power cord into receptacle, if saw starts the switch has failed
    cwmagee
    aka Fibber
    Producer of fancy firewood​

    Comment


    • #3
      Harry, I had the same problem a few months ago. I have the lamp that came with my machine. There was a 3 way plug that the foot pedal, machine and vacuum plugged into the back of the lamp, which plugged into the outlet. After a lot and I mean a lot of elimination turns out it was the outlet in the back of the lamp was bad. Got a new footpedal from harbor freight for $8. The picture shows the vacuum into the plug into the foot pedal and the foot pedal into the power strip, which is plugged into the outlet. The foot pedal operates the vacuum. As far as being overrated, I’ve had my machine 18 years and this is the first main issue I’ve had. Everything else was just normal upkeep. Hope this helps, if not I have no idea.
      Attached Files
      Betty

      "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

      Comment


      • #4
        Before you go nuts. Do you have an ohm meter? Or a friend that might. It is easy to do a couple of checks to isolate the problem.
        I am also not impressed about the switch advice.
        Take a look at these postings on what others have experienced.
        http://www.stevedgood.com/community/...?topic=18335.0

        For a saw to suddenly go dead would mean loss of power to me. If you can move the arms up and down then the motor is not seized, if you turn on the switch and it hummed but wouldn't run then typically it is a bad capacitor. But nothing at all I am thinking switch.
        Rolf
        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

        Comment


        • #5
          Rolf, that’s what happened to me. Since everything was plugged unto the back of the light nothing worked. If he doesn’t have it plugged into the back of a light, than I have no idea. The footpedal is still good. Bruce is going to use it for his router table. Light still works, just not the outlet in the back of it. Who did you talk to at Hegner? Maybe Carole has some ideas as she has a Hegner.
          Betty

          "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you for your info everyone.
            I am handy with most things but electrics isn't one of them.
            But I had to disagree with Chris from Hegner U.K
            My first thought was the switch, and after your comments
            confirms that. I know it isn't the capaciitor as their is no buzzing sound , and doubt very much if it's the motor.
            Hegner not helpful at all, they did not know of anywhere
            in my area could repair it. Probably ending up scrapping it.
            In answer to the question is it a foot operated machine,
            no it is operated directly from the machine.
            Anyway thank you all again for your interest.

            Harry.





            Comment


            • #7
              Harry, there is one more option you might try. Advanced Machinery is the Hegner distributor in this country. Unfortunately, their most knowledgeable member passed away a little while ago, but they probably still have someone around who has good technical knowledge.

              I copied out their full contact information, and suggest that you contact Wolfgang Derke and see if he has anything to offer. It could be that once you have some idea of what's going on, you might be able to find someone local with sufficient skills to help. Good luck!

              Carole

              Advanced Machinery
              2 McCullough Drive, Suite 1
              New Castle, DE 19720
              Phone: 302.322.2226 or 800.727.6553 (Mon-Fri:10am to 3pm Eastern Time)
              From outside the USA: 302.322.2226 (Mon-Fri:10am to 3pm Eastern Time)
              FAX: 866.686.1615
              E-Mail: [email protected]
              Carole

              Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Absolutely do not scrap this machine.! There has to be someone in your area that has electrical trouble shooting skills.
                Rolf
                RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                Comment


                • #9
                  THANK YOU Carole.
                  I assume the Newcastle address is Newcasle U.k
                  Harry.

                  I won't be scrapping the machine just yet, not without
                  getting someone who can be bothered to fix it, not easy
                  in the U.K.





                  Comment


                  • #10
                    New Castle, Delaware, USA
                    cwmagee
                    aka Fibber
                    Producer of fancy firewood​

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks, Fibber. Harry, the address is for New Castle, Delaware. That's what the DE stands for. But if you look at the contact info, you can easily reach Wolfgang by email, and they even have a phone number for people to call from outside the USA. I'd be very surprised if they could not help you.
                      Carole

                      Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Harry,

                        When you get the issue resolved please let us know what you found.

                        In my past life one of many jobs that I held in my career paths was a control technician for an electric utility on Long Island (just east of NYC).

                        I found that problem solving a challenge and I also took great interest as to the results. It is nice to put the final results in you back pocket for other incidents.

                        As I was writing this message it came to me that speed control may have failed. You might cycle it from high speed to low speed to see if you can get to work. If it does work I would replace it as it most likely will fail again.

                        As Rolf suggested someone with an ohmmeter could resolve the issue fairly quickly.
                        Last edited by cwmagee; 04-12-2020, 01:43 PM.
                        cwmagee
                        aka Fibber
                        Producer of fancy firewood​

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          As suggested above, I would bypass the switch first thing, which should be easy. Even if that doesn't work, there are many people that can troubleshoot electronics to the board level, you just have to find one of those. I suspect your motor is not blown. In the old days, you would find someone in the ham radio clubs or in the U.S., if you were lucky, the old guy working in the back at Radio Shack. These types exist everywhere, you just have to ask around and find one.
                          "Ever Striving, Never Arriving"
                          website: http://www.coincutting.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Even a TV or appliance repair shop should have the meter and skills to do a quick check. Of course they may charge you.
                            Scott
                            Creator of fine designer sawdust.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Harry, did you ever get this resolved?

                              the motor most likely is good. It’s not a high failure part. A switch maybe. Bypass the foot switch and any other device the saw may be plugged into by plugging it straight into the wall outlet. The speed knob is a definite failure point. The conductive material inside it can scrape away and give irrational speeds. Opening the control box is easy enough, be sure it is unplugged though! If you can get the wires off the back of the power switch they can be jumpered together to bypass that. Easier than that is to just look and smell the board. If it smells burnt or you see scorched bits, that’s the prob. Unfortunately electronics don’t always fail catastrophically.

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