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Driftwood carving

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Driftwood carving

    :The most excersise I get is when I RV around lakes and oceans looking for wood to carve.It seems you are always climbing and using alot of energy trying to get that piece that is partly obscured by rock or other debris.It is extremely difficult for me to id the wood , most of my id ing is guess work.And most need very little cutting! Its like taking a cloud home! Only you see the vission in the wood, says my wife! Love the message board and the site alot of good help and idea sharing. My education gets broader reading your tips on carving!Thanks, Thanks alot!

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  • pyrogite
    replied
    Re: Driftwood carving

    I probly just used polyurethane for the finish. I use flecto varathane on most of them now. Yup, I usually burn on all my sticks

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  • Big_Sid
    replied

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  • pyrogite
    replied
    Re: Driftwood carving

    I used flexcut palm gouges, they worked pretty good, but there was still a lot of sanding to do to get the edges rounded. I know that it is much easier to do using a rotary tool like dremel or ryobi, that's what friend uses and his go a lot faster than mine. If you like power tools, that would be the best way to do it. I'm not very comfortable using them.

    Donna

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  • Big_Sid
    replied
    Re: Driftwood carving

    How do you cut the holes in the mushroom Donna? I think I would love to make one for hunting mushrooms. I can get the Osage Orange but wasn't sure how you carved the holes out. Thanks.

    Jim

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  • pyrogite
    replied
    Re: Driftwood carving

    Big Sid,
    I don't do as much mushroom hunting as I used to. I made that stick for my niece, but I am not sure that her mother allows her to take it out where it might get lost. My husband uses his mushroom staff to chase them down tho, his was made from ironwood by the same guy who power carves the osage sticks.
    Nothing like the early spring woods!

    Donna

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  • Big_Sid
    replied
    Re: Driftwood carving

    Nice walking stick Donna. Do you use it when hunting mushrooms in the Spring? Very nice carving.

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  • pyrogite
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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Driftwood carving

    Osage orange is considered by many to be THE premier bow wood. Difficult to work but results are worth it. The Indians used the roots to make war clubs. The stuff has more names than a runaway felon. Horese apple is another one I've heard. As for being toxic ... in the form of a bow or war club I'd say extremely so. .. to the woodworker can't help but certainly hope not because I've probably got a good case of something by now.

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  • Big_Sid
    replied
    Re: Driftwood carving

    Hey capt. It does turn nice on the lathe however. I have never carved it but I do know it is pretty yellow when wet. It does turn colors later. I think fence posts are where the wood should stay. Question. Is that where hedge apples come from?

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  • Captain_Bandaid
    replied
    Re: Driftwood carving

    Grumpy, So far, I'v only made chips out of it! No, actually, I made a carving knife handle out of it. The handle split. I have managed to extract about 6 feet of tap root, which I am allowing to dry slowly. I have no idea if this will result in anything good. For those who have never seen it, this wood is a bright canary yellow when fresh cut and turns a deep brown when aged. And yes, it is harder than nine dollars worth of jawbreakers!

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  • grumpy560
    replied
    Re: Driftwood carving

    Cap'n, Learned something new there.
    Remember the comment about firewood? The way the wood splits and the hardness is why I prefer to BURN the stuff rather than try to carve it!
    As for weather or not it is toxic, I only know that if you get stuck by a thorn ( for those of you who don't know,it has thorns too!) it will sometimes turn the skin black, and usually stays that way a long time.
    By the way, what were you making out of it? ???
    No reason, just being nosey.

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  • Captain_Bandaid
    replied
    Re: Driftwood carving

    Actually, the proper name for Osage Orange is Bois D'Arc. This was reported to be a French name indicating that the Indians used the wood to make Bows. It is really an Osage Indian word that, roughly translated means ' this stuff splits like a ripe mellon, next time I'm using Hickory!'

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  • grumpy560
    replied
    Re: Driftwood carving

    Us Yankee's call osage orange..........Hedge. If you let that cure out, before carving, better be ready to resharpen the old tools SEVERAL times.
    I thought that the only thing it was good for is fence posts and firewood. Sparks fly off of the chain-saw chain when you try to cut some that has been dead for a while and had time to dry out.

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  • Captain_Bandaid
    replied
    Re: Driftwood carving

    :P I sent an e-mail to the US Forest Service to ask about the toxicity of Osage Orange. They replied that I needed to contact a local Extension Office. The local extension office said they had no information on toxicity of woods. Ummmm...what do they do with all the money we give them? Do they think money grows on trees? :-*

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