Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

My Hawk G4-26 and Pegas 2/0 modified geometry blades.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • My Hawk G4-26 and Pegas 2/0 modified geometry blades.

    I have learned something about my Hawk and probably any saw with the long arms. My normal small detail blade has been the Olson 2/0 R 28 TPI. It is slow cutting but very controllable. I figured that after 14 years I should be able to control a more aggressive blade.
    Bought some Pegas 2/0 R MGT 15.4 TPI , they are a bit thinner an narrower than the Olson.
    I noticed that the blade had a sideways wobble when running at my normal cutting speed. I have never noticed this before.
    So I increased the tension beyond where it should be and yes I broke a few blades. Brought the tension back to where it should be and slowed the saw down until the wobble went away.
    That worked and the the blades really cut very nicely.
    This is where I wish I had access to one of the EX style saws and do a comparison. I am thinking that the long arms of the Hawk have so much mass that there is some sort of varying tension going on with arm flex? I do not see this effect with a bigger blade.
    Or I need to go through my saw for a thorough tuneup.
    Last edited by Rolf; 04-02-2019, 09:05 AM.
    Rolf
    RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
    Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
    Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
    And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

  • #2
    I had an EX21 as well as an EX30. I did notice a slight diffference between the two in with what you are talking about. The longer armed 30" does fine with even something as small as the jewelers blade...but the shorter armed EX just seems to do better with those tiny blades.
    Linda at www.ArtIngrained.com

    Comment


    • #3
      I've found that the modified geometry blades break easier than the regular skip tooth or polar tooth blades. I believe it's because of the wider gullets between the teeth. Not a lot of metal there. Usually, though, it's when I over tighten the tension on the blade by pressing down to hard when locking the blade in the clamp.

      I found, though, that I'm able to maintain the speed on my EX-21 for the MG blades. I run a little slower for the 2/0 and #1 blades, but I don't slow down more because of the MG blades.
      Last edited by tgiro01; 04-02-2019, 03:22 PM. Reason: spelling
      Tony

      My Son-in-law said "Darnit, I cut this board twice, now. And it's still too short."

      Comment


      • #4
        The BM 26 had that also, but as soon as the blade touches the wood, the blade stablized. The OCD side of me had to be put back into the box. I don't think it makes any difference in practice, except maybe in getting that first "bite" when entering the cut.
        "Ever Striving, Never Arriving"
        website: http://www.coincutting.com

        Comment


        • #5
          I took another look at my saw last night to make sure I was not missing something. I am embarrassed to say I missed an obvious biggy. The bolt that holds my upper arm had worked it's way loose just enough to allow some side to side movement in my upper arm. This is what happens when you try to do too many things at once and don't focus.
          Rolf
          RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
          Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
          Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
          And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

          Comment


          • #6
            On the new fangled phones, the slow motion video and zoom is a very interesting way to look at blade stability, and from the side, blade travel/motion.
            "Ever Striving, Never Arriving"
            website: http://www.coincutting.com

            Comment

            Unconfigured Ad Widget

            Collapse

            Latest Topics

            Collapse

            • Bill Wilson
              Reply to wipe on poly and tack cloth
              by Bill Wilson
              First, follow the instructions on the can, regarding wait time between coats. I would think that for the first couple coats, re-applying while the previous coat was still tacky wouldn't be terrible, but I would warn that building several coats without allowing proper drying time, will extend the overall,...
              Today, 08:50 AM
            • Don in Brooklin On
              Reply to wipe on poly and tack cloth
              by Don in Brooklin On
              I use wipe on poly quite often and I apply 2 thin coats before sanding with 220 or 320. I wipe with a lint free. Someone told me not to use tack cloth as you can leave behind a wee bit of beeswax witch could cause issues later on.

              I make sure that the surface is dry and not tacky before...
              Yesterday, 05:41 AM
            • dwssr2
              wipe on poly and tack cloth
              by dwssr2
              Question, when sanding polyurethane in between coats, using a tack cloth, is it ok to wipe on poly while the project seems tacky or should a person wait a few hours to let it dry?
              How necessary is it to sand between coats of polyurethane? I am sure people have a lot of different opinions and...
              04-24-2019, 05:58 PM
            • tgiro01
              Reply to Do you know what this Is?
              by tgiro01
              Betty asked: "Where does the responsibility of the maker of an item end and the responsibility of the purchaser begin? My sealife puzzle is purchased by older people due to its complexity but - if they leave it laying around and a child gets a part and chokes, is that my responsibility or theirs?"...
              04-24-2019, 12:20 PM
            • RJweb
              Reply to Do you know what this Is?
              by RJweb
              The problem now a days everyone is sue happy, no matter who’s at fault, RJ...
              04-24-2019, 10:03 AM
            Working...
            X