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seeking blade reccomdations

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  • seeking blade reccomdations

    First point is I am not real good with the scroll yet, hopefully with more time I will improve my cutting accuracy. Most all my cutting has been with FDUR, which I do like the way they cut. I have a project of a unity cross for a gift that needs to be done in about 4 weeks. I am using curly maple for the insert part. Maple is about the hardest wood I have cut and it burns easily. Using packing tape really seems to help. My question is, would there be a better blade to cut the maple, 1 1/4" thick? I do not need to cut fast. The FDUR cut really smooth, smoother than I can sand, but fuzzies should not be a problem with project. Where would be a good place to purchase with very quick shipping. Thank you dan

  • #2
    Dan,

    First of all I used the FDUR for about 6 years and loved them Recently after reading Steve Goods Blog, I tried the Pegas Modified Geometry Blades and rarely use the FDUR blades. With the FDUR blades to stay on the line you must saw a degree or two to the left of straight. With the Pegas Modified Geometry you can cut straight on and with extreme accuracy.

    When cutting plywood, I do cover the underside of the project with the blue painters tape to eliminate any chipping of the bottom layer of the plywood.

    My experience has been different than others on the forum: Regarding burning I rarely have any burning when cutting any wood of any thickness. I do not use the packing tape, I find that the adhesive collects saw dust and cause the tape to lift from the project.
    My Saw speed is usually 75 to 80 percent of the saw speed range on almost all of my work. My EX21 vibrate too much at any higher speeds. MY choice of blade size is determined by the sharpness of the radius of curves of the pattern that I am cutting not by wood thickness alone. I try to use the smallest blade as possible and still get 90 deg cuts.

    I do get a few fuzzies on softer woods, I use the Mac Mope in my drill press to eliminate them.
    cwmagee
    aka Fibber
    Producer of fancy firewood​

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    • #3
      I always use PS Wood Blades They are precision ground and fairly aggressive blade that works well on hard woods. I have used a #2 blade on projects where the wood is 1 inch & over. A sharp blade doesn't leave fuzzies and the only wood that I have ever burned is cherry. Here is their website: http://pswood.com/. Note: She is going to the Midwest Scrollsaw show this weekend, so there may be a little delay on response. But she does get blades sent out quickly.
      Website:
      www.wix.com/tangowooddesign/home-page
      ___________________

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      • #4
        1-1/4 maple is a hard cut no mater what blade you use. We all have our blade preferences mine is Olson and for this I would use an Olson PGT 5 or maybe even a 7. They cut straight and clean.
        You did not say what size FDUR blade you are using. I buy my blades from Sloans.
        Rolf
        RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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        • #5
          1.25" Maple is asking a lot from just about any blade. One thing that might HELP prevent burning is to double wrap the project with packing tape. Most folks seem to think the lubricant that keeps the tape from sticking helps lubricate the blade and slow down burning.
          Jim
          When looking at the clock at work--the correct time is:
          Too early to leave, too late to call in.

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          • #6
            I agree that the Pegas blades seem to cut straight and not off to one side. Seems that a lot of folks prefer a lot of different blades. Tells me that they all must be pretty good and it is what you get used to.

            "Time to give back."
            "Time to Give Back"

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            • #7
              I have found that Pegas Blades are very brittle, or at least that is my opinion. I work with mostly 3/4 boards for my fret work and I have been using Sawtooth, Pegas, and FD #5 reverse tooth blades on Poplar, Red Oak, Cedar and Walnut. I alternate blades every time I change one out. Sawtooth starts out strong but dulls very quickly. Pegas is sharp but doesn't last long and tends to break easily in sharp corners or even with just a small bend to the blade. For me FD is the best of the 3. Stays sharper longer, cuts well and with minimum fuzzies and holds up well to the twists and turns of my projects. I even had a few Craftsman blades but they didn't hold up at all.

              Again this was just a little experiment I tried when I found all these blades sitting in my shop. Everyone has a favorite I am sure but the FD works the best for me.
              Brian in the Four Corners

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              • #8
                I called the folks at PS today, and ordered a sample pack. Hopefully they will come tomorrow. I believe they cost much more than FD. I will post how the work for me.

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                • #9
                  If you like FD blades, FD Polar may be the way to go for thick hard maple. FD UR and Polar are my blade choice.
                  Denny
                  ArtCrafters in Dayton, TN

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                  • #10
                    On some scrap, experiment with your blades.
                    Sometimes changing the speed of the saw makes a world of difference.
                    And how fast or slow you are pushing into the blade is big too.
                    It's all friction and the heat can kill blades fast.
                    Dull blades still cut, but burn wood and slow you down.
                    Change blades regularly.
                    You'll do great and we look forward to seeing pictures!
                    Linda at www.ArtIngrained.com

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                    • #11
                      One other thing is to change blades often. Cutting materials like that you effective blade life is 15 minutes or less.
                      Scott
                      Creator of fine designer sawdust.

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