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DeWalt 788 Easy-Lift Sytem?

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  • Woodbutcher68
    replied
    I'm a bottom feeder with an Easy-Lift too. I got mine a week after I bought my saw. When I'm not using it, I put a piece of 2X4 under the arm in the up position. It takes some strain off the spring, so I hope it will last longer.

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  • JimSawyer
    replied
    Duh, sorry there. Momentary lapse of reason. I got my terms turned around. I've been a bottom feeder for 17 years. What I meant to say was That I had never thought of top feeding. Although, I do have a problem. Because I do alot of inlay work, I have to put a couple of pieces of masking tape over over the blade hole to make a sort of zero clearance set-up. Otherwise I can loose some very small pieces. This leaves me with a very small hole to thread down into. However, the next time I do anything fretted, I'm going to try top feeding.

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  • lucky788scroller
    replied
    Jimsawyer.. a bottomfeeder feeds the blade UP through the wood, and reclamping at the top clamp.And as unixpro stated, you do in fact get into a rhythm, and its even hard to explain, but a 6 second blade change from hole to hole bottom feeding is quick enough for me,thats why Im still a bottomfeeder.Honest, I has nothing to do with my thick hard skull!!! Dale

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  • unixpro
    replied
    I'm a bottom feeder and I have the easy-lift attached to my saw. I couldn't imagine doing without it. Cut, right hand moves left to detension, unscrew the blade, lift the arm, locate the next hole and feed the blade through. Screw the blade down, right hand pushes the top down and retensions the blade, then hits the power button on the top. It can become a real rhythm there after a while.

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  • JimSawyer
    replied
    Wow, I never even considered bottom feeding. I'll have to give that a go and see how it works. When I had my old Taiwanees saw, it had a blade clamp on the bottom and an easy-jig for the top, so I've always been accustomed to top feeding. Picture that. I would pull the blade clampp from the bottom, position mypiece on the table, at an angle, push the blade up through the table and into the piece, (all this with my neck at a 98 degree angle,ouch). then lock the top with the quick-jig. Hey, not for nothing, I did some pretty incredible work like that, (what was I thinking. Give me my 788 any day).
    So I guess I'll have to try that bottom feeding thing. Still, will I have to crane my neck to lock the bottom clamp? Thanks for the imput, all.

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  • Minnesota scroller
    replied
    Originally posted by JoelM
    I top feed, but I've never raised the arm. I just remove the blade, reposition the wood and drop the blade through another hole. I suppose if I did raise the arm there would be more room. I'll have to give it a try.
    Joel, while top feeding, I hold the arm up and feed the blade with my right hand and guide the wood with my left. Once the blade is in the hole, I slowly lower the arm.
    Last edited by Minnesota scroller; 03-04-2007, 05:12 PM.

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  • JoelM
    replied
    I top feed, but I've never raised the arm. I just remove the blade, reposition the wood and drop the blade through another hole. I suppose if I did raise the arm there would be more room. I'll have to give it a try.

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  • Minnesota scroller
    replied
    Joel, if bottom feeding, release the top of the blade, raise the upper arm, and then thread the top of the blade thru the hole in the bottom of the wood. Of course, you have to hold the wood as high as possible to be able to see under it to find the holes. Then reclamp. No, it's not a dumb question. If you don't ask, you don't learn.

    However, I'm with Bill regarding top feeding. I don't really see any value to this if use his method. If I was still bottom feeding, I would probably consider the Jim Dandy.
    Last edited by Minnesota scroller; 03-04-2007, 11:32 AM.

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  • Janette
    replied
    I have the easy lift system and think it's great. The only thing I noticed with it is that I have to hold the arm down a bit prior to tightening the blade, but that's probably just because of how I have the tension adjusted on it. I put the blade in on top, tighten the bottom, then go and retighten the top, holding the arm down - then do the tension , which I find is perfect around 31/2 or 4.

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  • JoelM
    replied
    This is probably a dumb question, but....
    do you raise the upper arm and leave the blade in the top clamp, or do you remove the blade from both clamps, raise the arm out of the way, then thread the blade? I haven't been raising the arm at all, I just remove the blade and rethread with the upper arm down.

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  • Dragon
    replied
    I've tried Marcel's saw and he has one. I thought it was great. I will eventually get myself one. It is much better than the piece of wood.
    Diane

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  • ozarkhillbilly
    replied
    Hello Jim, I personally don't have one nor ever used one, but feed back from those who do have always been positive It's a good concept and I think a fair price.

    I top feed with my Dewalt and really have no trouble raising the arm with my left hand and threading the blade with my right. I guess its what you get used to.
    I'd rather spend the $20.00 on wood,blades,patterns.............
    Last edited by ozarkhillbilly; 03-05-2007, 05:33 AM.

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  • JimSawyer
    started a topic DeWalt 788 Easy-Lift Sytem?

    DeWalt 788 Easy-Lift Sytem?

    I was just wondering if anyone has used the Easy-Lift system for the 788. Right now I've got a piece of wood that I stick in there to hold up the upper arm. I haven't had any real problems. But it has gotten in my way when threading a hole deep in the pattern. Does it work? Is it easy to use? Is it worth the $20 ?

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