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lubrication on dremel scrollstation??

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  • lubrication on dremel scrollstation??

    Can anyone advise what I should use to lubricate Dremel Scrollstation ??

    in the manual they say reoil after 50 hours or whnever a squeak is heard then later on they say grease ??

    so do I use oil or grease

    regards

    Adam

  • #2
    i have the 1860 dremel
    as far as for lubricarion my manual says to turn the saw on its side then pull the rubber plug on the arm and fill the small cavity with non detergent 30 weight motor oil, and replace cap let the saw set overnight,

    next day turn saw over to the other side and do the same, let set overnight

    i blow out dust and dig out the broken blade pieces wood scraps and run off the spiders

    i dont use my dremel that much i prefur my delta no reason though...

    look on the dremel website you can download manuals for your specific saw which might have different lube points than mine
    Dremel 1680 & Delta ss250 shopmaster

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    • #3
      Hi,
      Thanks for the advice on lubricating much appreciated...I looked on the US site and that is much more helpfull than the uk one.

      I oiled it today and all seems well

      thanks again

      Adam

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      • #4
        Mick, - Delta P-20

        A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

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        • #5
          dremell lub

          i have a dremell 1830 and the manual said lub after first 10 hour. i remove the plug and check to see the it needs oil
          bob

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          • #6
            I have a Dremel 1830 scroll saw a bit over one year old. When the arm bearings on my saw started squeaking I called Dremel Customer support and the lady said to turn the saw on its side and put in either 10w-30 or 10w-40 motor oil. I asked if machine oil should be used instead and she said definitely use the detergent motor oil. Instead of doing that (but-head that I am) I took some cotton balls, saturated them with PB Blaster and stuffed them under the caps. This cured the squeaking for awhile. However, no matter how often I do this, after about 20 or 30 minutes, when the saw has warmed up, it starts squeaking. Let it cool off for a while and its fine again.

            A more serious problem is the link pivots that connect the two arms in the back of the saw. The link appears to be a steel stamping with roll pins that connect the arms. This was shipped with no lubrication nor a means to lubricate those pivots. I have taken the screws out of the sides of the frame and wedged the halves apart just enough to get the red straw on a can of white litium spray grease and squirted that on the pivots. Since owning my saw I have done this twice. If these pivots are not lubricated the holes that the roll pins fit into will wear into an egg shape and you can no longer tension the blade.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by rja View Post
              I have a Dremel 1830 scroll saw a bit over one year old. When the arm bearings on my saw started squeaking I called Dremel Customer support and the lady said to turn the saw on its side and put in either 10w-30 or 10w-40 motor oil. I asked if machine oil should be used instead and she said definitely use the detergent motor oil. Instead of doing that (but-head that I am) I took some cotton balls, saturated them with PB Blaster and stuffed them under the caps. This cured the squeaking for awhile. However, no matter how often I do this, after about 20 or 30 minutes, when the saw has warmed up, it starts squeaking. Let it cool off for a while and its fine again.

              A more serious problem is the link pivots that connect the two arms in the back of the saw. The link appears to be a steel stamping with roll pins that connect the arms. This was shipped with no lubrication nor a means to lubricate those pivots. I have taken the screws out of the sides of the frame and wedged the halves apart just enough to get the red straw on a can of white litium spray grease and squirted that on the pivots. Since owning my saw I have done this twice. If these pivots are not lubricated the holes that the roll pins fit into will wear into an egg shape and you can no longer tension the blade.

              Same thing happen to my saw, I have a reconditioned 1830 and after about 2 weeks I had issues with the squeak..I oiled as the manual said and still the same thing..I kept running it trying to figure out where it was comming from..Finally I ran out of threads on the tension lever..I called Dremel and gave them a huge rant about it and she asked what parts I needed. I said I needed anything in there that pivots or moves..couple days later I got a whole set of bushings for the arms and new stamped connector arm with roll pins ect. free of charge..Two years later after putting in the connector arm ( never did use the bushings as they was ok ) its still working good..BUT I take the saw completely apart about every 30 or so hours and clean it good and re-grease it back up..
              These should be better made for easier maintainance ( I don't think you should have to take apart all the time like this) My Delta saw is the same way..The manuals say to oil the bushings but never mention of the connector arm..

              Kevin
              Kevin
              www.KevsKrafts.com

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              • #8
                I have a 1 1/2 year old dremel 1680 scroll saw. It doesn't squeak, squawk or anything else. Kind of makes me happy that I don't have the newer model. The only problem I have had was that the toggle switches went bad. I added a different shop light replacing the original light and hot wired the power switch. Now I use a foot switch to turn the saw on and have no problems. Knock on wood!
                -- Rick --

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                • #9
                  I have the dremel station also. I took the cover off cause the tension in the main shaft was loose and I have to shorten my blades to get it to tighten the blades. Anyway when I took off the side cover it has WHITE GREASE on the upper and lower pivot points if you oil it, it will cut the grease and make it thinner....you might want to grease it.

                  by the way the back tension bar is just that a flat bar and the holes in it a getting worn out. no adjustment just replacement and the company is no longer selling scroll saws.....


                  Hammerle
                  Last edited by HAMMER; 11-18-2009, 03:48 PM. Reason: spelling

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                  • #10
                    Well, thanks for the post folks. I had my tension lever give way on the weekend do to the threads being stripped, because I was working at the very end of its range. Took things apart and there is definitely too much play in the rocker arms due to the spring pins causing holes in the lever at the back. Should have looked here earlier! Now I know what I'll be asking for tomorrow from the Canadian service folks.

                    Just wish it had happened the weekend before my first show! Actually it's all good, I have enough to display and I can try and take orders for things I don't have much in stock

                    -Peter .... 1st time poster...short time scroller

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                    • #11
                      Just talked with the rep at the Dremal tool company and they new just what I was talking about when I mentioned the bar at the back. They charged me $4.91 for the bar and two pins then asked me "Do you want a back up with that just n case?" Oh well they are aware of the problems with there tool maybe thats why they aren't selling them anymore..... don't want tho re-engineer the product.


                      Hammer

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                      • #12
                        Update on the Dremel - Since getting my Hegner saw the Dremel has been sidelined a bit. Therefore, I had the time to do as Dremel customer support said: turn the saw on its side and fill the upper and lower arm bearings with either 10w-30 or 10w-40. I used the latter since that's what I had. Let each side soak for 24 hours. I could tell the oil was getting through because the oil level declined over the 24 hrs. I set up the saw on a new stand (that's another story) and used it for a while and sure enough after about 30 minutes the bearings started to squeak again. I have no idea how to keep the bearings from squeaking. Anyone have a method that has worked?

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                        • #13
                          Hello,

                          Well I got the bar and the two pins I ordered from the Dremel company. Just last night I had time to work on replacing the back metal tension bar. Boy what a job.

                          You have to take the cover off, loosen the cutting top, rermove the black metal shield over the counter balance, disconnect the counter balance, then remove the upper and lower bars from the pivot holes, drive the pins out of the back of hte arms top and bottom then replace the bar with the new one and drive the new pins into the holes in the arms (make sure you don't turn the arms over and connect one of them backwards), lubricate both points, don't get any dust in the grease, grease the main piviot points (bearings), did I mention disconnecting the the base and the switch control assembly?, then reassemble the arms back in the pivot points not pinching any wiring, watch for the main cord it has a plug that will jump out of its slot, and reassemble the whole thing in reverse order. When driving the pins out you will want a bench vise or an anvil a very small punch and a desent weighted hammer.

                          Mine is now back on the cutting table took about 2 1/2 to 3 hours to do and there is NO funny noises at all except for the motor purring along.

                          Not only were the hole in the metal bar deformed but the pins (which are metal tube) were cut half way through making them hard to drive out. This area is not accessable unless you open up the saws case so lubricating the pivot points won't do a thing to stop any squeek as they are about 6" to 8" apart.

                          I don''t know if this is in time to help anyone but here it is as I just got to fixing it...



                          Sinerely Hammer

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