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  • router advice

    I'm in the market for a router for light duty work. Do you experienced woodsmen recommend plunge or fixed base? I won't be using it in a table and it won't be deep, heavy duty routing. What do you think of this one?
    http://www.amazon.com/Ryobi-Peak-Plu...5?ie=UTF8&s=hi or this http://www.amazon.com/Black-Decker-R...e=UTF8&s=hione
    Last edited by Minnesota scroller; 01-17-2007, 12:28 PM.
    Mike

    Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
    www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

  • #2
    you have a portercable/dewalt/delta factory repair center near you? I don't know how far you are from the city, but that's a good place to get a price break on a reconditioned router. Porter cable is one of the best for durability and interchangability with itself, but I have some craftsman routers too that I picked up from classified in the paper and those have never given me any trouble other than the bulky uncomfortableness of them. I have bad luck with black and decker products, but maybe that's just me. The Ryobi router looks like a good deal and somewhat comfortable, and looks like it plunges too. I have no experience with that company, but the price is cheap..maybe it's reconditioned. I have good luck with Bosch products too, and they are usually pretty cheap.
    The ryobi you point out is rated for 2 hp, that's more than all you ever need unless your making cabinet doors with raised panels. Remember that's not 2hp all the time, that's 2hp when the machine either catches on fire or the lights go out. but still, it's plenty of power. Keep an eye on them classified's in the paper too...I buy the crappiest routers if they are only 15-20 dollars, and not an orange color, because if they break, I'm only out a few bucks.
    Jeff Powell

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    • #3
      I have a Ryobi router and so far I really like it. I haven't had any trouble with it, plenty of power and a really reasonable price. For inexpensive tools, Ryobi seems to make pretty good ones, although I'm not impressed with their cheap scrollsaw. I have several Ryobi tools and have been very satisfied with them, some I bought new and some used. I have put tons of hours on my bench belt/disc sander, thinning boards cause I don't have a planer, without a single problem except wearing out belts. I have thinned some really hardwood. Of course, they aren't professional grade tools, but the price is very good for a decent quality product. (No I don't work for them or have any relatives that do, just a satisfied customer.)

      Chris
      What! There's no coffee?!!

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      • #4
        Jeff,

        Do you know if the Portcable factory repair centers have other reconditioned tools? Delta makes a spindle sander for about $200 and I was wondering if they might have something like that. There's one less than an hour from the house. They were about 30 minutes away but moved last month. It still might be worth the drive.
        Kelly
        "All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them." Walt Disney

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        • #5
          according to Ryobi industries employee payout sheets, says right there, Chris the copperfish. I don't see an IRS income claim...you might be in some serious trouble come april !
          Jeff Powell

          Comment


          • #6
            yes Dusty, they sell those if they have one. There was one at the store in detroit yesterday when I was there. One thing I like about them is they fix their products for a flat rate maximum charge. Some repair places charge for parts and then by the hour, and the next thing you know, your $5 away from a brand new tool. Porter cable gives you the same warranty on a reconditioned tool as they do on a new tool, and the warranty stands even in an industrial setting, where alot of other tools don't. Not so sure about their delta division, or maybe delta owns them? The one I saw on the shelf was about $40 under the new price for the spindle sander. You can look online too for reconditioned tools, delta or whatever your into.
            Jeff Powell

            Comment


            • #7
              Mike,
              What are you planning on using it for? This could make a big difference in your choice. If you're just looking for something for putting roundovers and such, a laminate trimmer may be a better option.
              Kevin
              Scrollsaw Patterns Online
              Making holes in wood with an EX-30, Craftsman 16" VS, Dremel 1680 and 1671

              Comment


              • #8
                Kevin, right now the only purpose I have for a router is key hole slots and routing recesses in the back of electrical outlet and switch covers. I'm sure I'll find more uses as time goes on like rounding over edges, etc. Like I said, it will be used for just light duty work, only things I have scrolled.
                Mike

                Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
                www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

                Comment


                • #9
                  according to Ryobi industries employee payout sheets, says right there, Chris the copperfish. I don't see an IRS income claim...you might be in some serious trouble come april !
                  Shhhhhhhh! Don't tell on me!!!
                  What! There's no coffee?!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Mike,
                    For routing key-hole slots the plunge router is a necessity. It will also make recesses much easier. I've had horrible luck with Ryobi tools so I don't recommend them although others have had great luck with them. A router is such a dangerous tool that it's one area where I would never skimp. It sounds like a great deal at $59.99, but I've got bits that cost more than that, hehehe. My first choice in routers is Porter-Cable, followed by Bosch. Both have nice plunge-base models available.
                    Kevin
                    Scrollsaw Patterns Online
                    Making holes in wood with an EX-30, Craftsman 16" VS, Dremel 1680 and 1671

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hey Mike,
                      I had never used a router before but about a month before xmas I treated myself to a Bosch Colt. It is real light but very user friendly. I have used it to round over edges & with a straight bit I have freehanded some letters for a sign. It works beautiful for things like that & in my research got very high reviews. Got mine at Menards

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I would recommend either a porter cable, dewalt, or bosch router kit, which will have both a fixed and a plunge base. I have Bosch, and think they are great.I do think the PC ones might be even better, since most places that make the easylifts for tablemounting design them around the PC 690 series. dale
                        (search on here about routers, this topic was covered pretty well a couple months ago)
                        Dale w/ yella saws

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Impressed!

                          After reading Randy's post I decided to check out the specs of the Bosch Colt. The reviews are great. I had a few questions, so I called the 800 number for Bosch, and was I surprised. I got a live person after just 1 ring. I almost dropped the phone. The lady I spoke with was very friendly and helpful but a couple questions she couldn't answer. She asked me to call back during normal business hours and I'd get transferred to a technician. I made this phone call at 6:10 PM their time. So far, Bosch has really impressed me. You seldom get this kind of customer service these days. I'm already leaning towards a Bosch router. I am going to cancel my order to Amazon for the Black & Decker. I just remembered, they are the cheaper division of Dewalt.
                          Mike

                          Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
                          www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I may be wrong here Mike, and not that it really matters, but I believe Black and Decker is the parent corp. of Dewalt as well as Porter Cable and Delta Machinery and a host of others that may surprise you!
                            http://www.bdk.com/

                            Back to your orginal question, I too am in favor of the Bosch, pretty much anything with that name on it is of good quality. I deal with this company often and as you have already discovered they do have great customer service, both at the customer level as well as for the retail vendor.
                            Bill

                            DeWalt 788



                            aut viam inveniam aut faciam

                            God gives us only what we can handle.. Apparently God thinks I am one tough cookie.....

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              For what its worth, one of my sons-in-law had a Ryobi and it didn't last at all. I know other people have had good luck with them but I have had a couple of Ryobi tools and now spend a bit more and get a lot more quality.

                              EarlinJax

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