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  • What kind of scroll saw would you buy today?

    I am at a point of wanting to be a new scroll saw and am shopping for opinions about which to buy. I'm leaning toward a Hegner. Thanks in advance for any input.
    cskipper
    Cathy

  • #2
    Hi Cathy

    You won't go far wrong with a Hegner. However, I know it's an obvious thing to say but please make sure you've identified what it is you want from your new saw. What are the limitations you're experiencing with your Delta? What other options have you considered?

    Gill
    There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
    (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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    • #3
      Limitations of current Delta

      The biggest problem that I am having is inconsistency in pieces when I am stack cutting. I am either stacking1/8 or 1/4" stock for ornaments, coasters, etc and have a significant difference in the top and bottom piece. If I only stack up to 1" thick I can't use any pattern that has thin "walls" because the bottom piece tends to not be usable.

      I also make a lot of trivets (and according to a gallery I sold some pieces to, window decorations). I use 1/4 - 3/8" stock, depending on how I think the piece is going to be used. Stack cutting these still gives me the problem with incosistency and vibration. I cut slowly and work at not forcing the blade, but feel that the problem is largely due to the motion of the arm/blade. I hate to cut anything without stack cutting - it just seems like poor use of my time since my shop time is limited.

      I started with the Delta because it wasn't the cheapest but not $500. I wasn't really sure how much I would enjoy cutting with it and didn't want to make a huge investment. Now I am thoroughly hooked.

      I really want to start cutting those really challenging pieces with the gazillion inside cuts and thin connections between pieces (like the Pups on a Bench). I know I can buy a DeWalt that will resolve some of these issues. But since I don't plan on buying a saw every couple of years (wishful thinking?) I wonder if it makes more sense to just go ahead and make the big jump.
      Cathy

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      • #4
        Sounds to me like the saw is out of adjustment. There's alot of scrollers using delta's without those problems. I'd start by increasing the blade tension and then I'd check the squareness of the blade to the table. I don't really care for using an actual square because the teeth on a blade are offset to one side causing the blade to wander in that direction. Get a scrap of 3/4 lumber or more and make a straight cut into it about 1/2" deep. flip the wood over and make an identicle cut about 1/4" to the side of your last cut. Now measure the distances of the cut from top to top and bottom to bottom. The two cuts should be exactly parrallel to one another. Also, train yourself to make all your cuts in the same direction. I'm a counter clockwise cutter myself.
        Jeff Powell

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        • #5
          If I were buying one today, I'd give the Diamond serious consideration as well. As I like to create and cut patterns for "woodworms on steroids" which is what it sounds like you want to cut as well top feeding is immensely helpful. The Hawk G4 and the Excaliburs offer this. I have an EX 30 and stack everything. No regrets in my purchase.
          Kevin
          Scrollsaw Patterns Online
          Making holes in wood with an EX-30, Craftsman 16" VS, Dremel 1680 and 1671

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          • #6
            I agree with Jeff - it sounds as if your table is out of alignment with your blade. His technique for checking alignment is failsafe and I'd strongly urge you to follow his advice. After all, why buy a new saw if you can correct the error so easily?

            That said, if you're going to be doing a lot of scrolling it will be handy to have two saws because there'll inevitably be times when one of them needs servicing. If you're making a lot of piercing cuts, look for a saw that has quick blade change mechanisms. This is one aspect where machines such as larger Hegners really score over Diamonds. It takes a lot longer to change a blade than the eight seconds that Diamond claim!

            Gill
            There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
            (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

            Comment


            • #7
              Another great way to check for square and I use it when ever I am in doubt. Get a 3/4 inch of scrap, cut in about 1/4 inch then cut a circle and come back to where you started. If the cut piece comes out nicely in both directions it is square. If not use Jeff's method to find which way to go. Good Luck
              Chuck D


              When a work lifts your spirits and inspires bold and noble thoughts in you, do not look for any other standard to judge by: the work is good, the product of a master craftsman.
              Jean De La Bruyere...

              l
              Hegner 18, Delta p-20, Griz 14 inch Band saw

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              • #8
                scroll saws

                Originally posted by Jediscroller
                If I were buying one today, I'd give the Diamond serious consideration as well. As I like to create and cut patterns for "woodworms on steroids" which is what it sounds like you want to cut as well top feeding is immensely helpful. The Hawk G4 and the Excaliburs offer this. I have an EX 30 and stack everything. No regrets in my purchase.
                I'd never heard of the Diamond before. What is the conversion rate in currency?
                Cathy

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                • #9
                  If I were to buy a new saw today I would still buy the RBI G4.
                  More room under the top arm for thick wood and my fingers.
                  Top or bottom feeding
                  An almost vertical cut motion.
                  ( I know someone asked me to measure the front to back motion, sorry havn't had a chance)
                  I would also take a hard look at the Eclipse.
                  I wish someone in our club had a P20, I would really like to try one.
                  Rolf
                  RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                  Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                  Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                  And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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                  • #10
                    Eclipse

                    I haven't been able to determine from the literature, does the Eclipse require a tool for changing the blade?
                    Cathy

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                    • #11
                      There isn't a saw on the market that I would trade for my Delta P-20 . Including an Eclipse because then not only would I not be able to top feed very easily . . . I wouldn't be able to top feed at all.
                      And I wouldn't have a nation wide network of parts and service depots available to me just in case I might ever require their services.
                      W.Y.
                      Last edited by William Young (SE BC); 11-25-2006, 10:35 PM.
                      http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

                      The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

                      Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

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