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Blade cuts way too far right in Dewalt 788

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  • Blade cuts way too far right in Dewalt 788

    Can anyone please help me? I recenlty had to replace my bottom blade holder because the lines were stripped or something and the clamp screw just spun around. I have replaced the new part and now when I go to cut a straight line, it feeds way too far to the right even if I am standing to the right side. It does not even go in a straight line. I think that the blade must not be directly even obviously and have tried adjusting the set screw etc. My question is, how far into the middle should the set screw be to have the blade straight up and down to cut straight? Should you be able to see the screw in the middle of the space where the blade goes? I am not sure and have tried several adjustments but it is not hleping. And the table itself is square because I have checked it with a level. The problem seems to bee the way the blade is in the holder or something. Any advice because I am not mechanically inclined.
    Thanks.

  • #2
    anniep34, I don't own a Dewalt 788 but I can tell you that most scrollsaw blades pull to the right. There is a slight burr on the right side of the teeth. You have to adjust to that when sawing, if it is pulling WAY to the right then there may be a problem with your saw. No doubt a 788 owner will chime in here and give you more advice. One more point, you should use a small square to see if the blade is at 90° to the table rather than a level. Good luck with it.
    Mick, - Delta P-20

    A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

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    • #3
      while I'm not an expert on the 788s yet I've learned alot about them in the past week trying to get my wifes machine working. The blade must be moving straight up and down to get a decent cut, this doesn't mean the table needs to be at a right angle to the blade to begin with. On the drive motor there is a slot for a screwdriver, this way you can manually move the arms up and down, set the arms to full up or down. With a blade in the machine, tensioned, and the table at 0 deg take a piece of metal (1/4" thick or so, aluminum, steel or brass) with a good edge (machined) and set it up to the Blade. Then turn the motor and see if there is a change in the gap on the blade to the piece of metal. From there you can release the blade tension and adjust the set screws and repeat untill the blade sings along the metal during the total stroke. I'm going to go play with the saw for a bit, I'll check back later to see if you understand this and if it worked.

      Carl

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      • #4
        Should you be able to see the screw in the middle of the space where the blade goes?

        Yes, the blade should be touching only the set screw and the thumb screw, not the holder itself.

        Scrollhead

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        • #5
          The previous posts should cover your problem. A good quality blade should also be tried, maybe the one you are using isnt quite right. Expect your saw to cut at a slight angle from straight when looking at the saw, but not WAY off to the side. Yes, your blade should be tightened against the setscrew, not against the holder itself. Start by adjusting the screw opposite the thumbscrew, on your bottom holder so it visually matches the top blade holder. Then insert a fresh blade and tension it, then check to see if its traveling straight up and down. even a small piece of wood against the side of the blade will tell you that. I do think most of your problem will be cured with a good blade, getting those setscrews aligned, and a little more practice. How old is your scrollsaw? And, look on the motor, out of curiousity does it say Type 1 or Type 2 on the motor? I hope your saw is making dust and making you smile. Dale
          Dale w/ yella saws

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          • #6
            It could possibly be your blade. I was cutting a portrait yesterday and at 1 point I had to feed at almost 45 degrees to get a straight line. I thought this very weird. Eventually, the blade broke. After putting in a new blade, I didn't have the problem again. I use all the same high quality blades so evidentally I had a defective blade.
            Mike

            Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
            www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

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            • #7
              Thanks for all your help. I did try a new blade and it works much better. Now I have the problem of the blade slipping out of the bottom holder when I apply tension. It works for a while and then it acts up again. I have a saw that is only a couple of years old and i did read something about the blade holders in these ones being too far apart or something but I didn't see anything that we can do to correct the problem. I am trying to work with the screws etc to see if I can get it working properly.

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              • #8
                I'd take the thumb screw out and rough it up a bit with sandpaper. I also rub then ends of my blades with a scrap of sandpaper. Blades are packed with a little oil to keep them from rusting. If you don't remove the oil, it builds up on the screws and they start slipping.

                The screws do get worn smooth over time as well, so if you rough them up with sandpaper, it gives them more "bite."

                Bob Duncan
                Technical Editor
                www.GrobetUSA.com

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                • #9
                  Take a look at the motor on the saw and it will say either type 1 or type 2. It's many of the type 2 Dewalts that have had the problems with the blade holders too far apart.
                  Mike

                  Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
                  www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

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                  • #10
                    Like Bob suggests, remove the thumbscrew and rub it on a piece of sandpapera few strokes. As you use the screw hundreds of times, the end will become work hardened, and may not hold the blade good.Put your sandpaper on a flat surface, and drag your screw across it a few times, keeping your screw as close to a right angle with the paper as possible. Then................ go build a masterpiece! Dale
                    Dale w/ yella saws

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