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  • Question About Blades

    I always use the same blades mainly because they work for me and I buy a few grosses at a time so I don't run out. This time when I made my order I decided to mix and match a gross to try some new blades. I use Olson and FD blades depending on what I'm cutting but this time I got some FD Ultra Reverse and some Penguin Silver double reverse and I don't know if it's me or the blades but they don't seem to cut very well but they will burn the wood very easy.

    I am cutting 3/4 hardwood (yellowheart, purpleheart, bubinga, cumaru, bloodwood, and lacewood) and I use clear packing tape to lubricate the blade, good tension, good blade speed. But it takes alot more force than it should to get the blades to cut and that only burns the wood. I can put in a FD scroll reverse #5 and it seems to cut fine or any other blade that I'm used to and it's OK.So is it just me or the wood I'm using, or what?
    It's only a mistake if someone saw you do it.

    It's not about what saw you drive. It's about the skill you drive it with.

    Jim

  • #2
    On FD-Mike site and his order form he provides a little info on the blades as to if they are good for thick/thin wood. I'm not familiar with those particular blads as I only use the flatend spirals or other spirals. The only straight blades I use are 2 different ones one for thin and another one for thick and they are only used to cut the outsides of my portriats as I don't use a table saw or a band saw for this process. Now I've noticed that some of the thicker woods up to 1 1/2" thick it's taken a little longer and is a little harder to cut through with a particular blade as far as the burning I've not had that problem in yrs. I use to have a lot of that and a lot of blade breakage when I first started cutting thicker woods. I just used less force and let the blade cut and before I knew it I wasn't having this problem. You might email Mike or others that sale the blades (Mike's the only one I deal with) and ask this same question and you'll get a better answer and better help. Mikes Link is Mike's Workshop English featuring: my life story, a cancer survivor, scrollsawing samples and tips, community service, list of favorite sites and Flying Dutchman fretsaw blades for sale.
    "Keep Scrolling Along"
    Chris "The WoodArtist"
    https://www.facebook.com/TheWoodArtistWoodShop

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    • #3
      Save the less agressive blades for the thin stuff as they will give you more control.

      ------Randy
      "Ever Striving, Never Arriving"
      website: http://www.coincutting.com

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      • #4
        Reverse blades don't clear the sawdust as well as "down-only" blades, causing the blade to get hot if you cut aggressively, and leading to the possibility of burning in thicker woods.

        I never use reverse blades - I am going to sand anyway.
        Ron
        www.turtleteasers.com

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        • #5
          I guess I was just thinking that Ultra reverse would cut better than regular scroll reverse. Today I used them on some thinner wood and they work fine, I think I was just expecting more than I should've.
          It's only a mistake if someone saw you do it.

          It's not about what saw you drive. It's about the skill you drive it with.

          Jim

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          • #6
            Ron,
            Check when the blade is in the lowest stand. You will see that there are no reverse teeth left in the wood.
            FD Mike
            SD Mike

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            • #7
              Mike,

              I am not saying that reverse blades don't clear the sawdust at all, just that they don't do it as well as regular blades. Regular blades discharge sawdust downwards throughout the entire downstroke, whereas reverse blades only achieve this for part of the downward stroke. Moreover, with thin stock, some of the reverse teeth may break through the upper surface at the end of the upstroke, leaving whiskers on the upper surface, which is particularly bad if you are cutting a jigsaw with pasted-on image.

              If you are having problems with blades burning your work, one of the remedies may be not to use reverse blades.

              As I said before, I don't use reverse blades, which also means that I don't have to keep such a wide range of blade types on hand. I think that reverse blades are a neat solution for a problem that doesn't really exist.
              Ron
              www.turtleteasers.com

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