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drill bit travel??

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  • drill bit travel??


  • #2
    To stop the drill wandering, grip as much of the parallel section of the drill in the chuck as possible. Drill the holes as deep as this will allow. Now pull the drill futher out of the chuck, then drill the holes again. With very small drills you may need to pull the drill out just 3mm (1/8") drill the holes then repeat. Small drills will try to follow the grain of the wood. Feed the drill slowly and retract often to clear the chips. Ie drill down 3mm,retract, drill another 2-3mm retract. etc etc.
    Hope this helps, Nick.

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    • #3
      I also meant to say, check your drill is sharp.
      Nick.

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      • #4
        Some of the deflection is from the wood grain and some from the Dremel Workstation.I tightened some and adjusted some on my workstation to get it better but it still has some deflection.
        Tony

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        • #5
          Tim, I've found just barley make contact and stop 'til the bid settles down then continue very slowly.
          May the wind at you back .....
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          • #6
            In my experience, the smaller the bit, the more it wanders. There are many reasons, grain patterns, varying density of the layers, flex of the drill press as well as flex of the bit. Clean, sharp bits and light pressure as well as frequent chip clearing will help. Also, make sure the layers in the stack are secure. They shouldn't move around or catch on the drill bit and pop up, causing sawdust to trap between the layers. Try a new high speed steel bit from a reputable maker, some of the cheapee brands aren't worth the grief.
            Lou.

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            • #7
              Oily makes a real good point, the smaller bits usually bend to follow the grain when first entering the wood. This is really significant on woods like Oak. Another thing is to take a very pointed punch and mark where you are going to drill, that will break the grain. On bigger holes that is why people use brad point bits.

              Lou - Where do you get the small gauge high speed bits from?
              Steve.
              EX-16, DW-788, Dremel 1680

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              • #8
                Steve,
                Better quality bits can be found on Amazon.com, Graingers catalog, McMaster,s, or a local machine shop supplier. Back in the day when I was in the electronics industry, we used them to drill thru pc boards for test equipment jigs and fixtures. The hardware and home center varieties were much to flexible to drill a straight hole.
                Lou.

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                • #9
                  steve
                  drill bits that are small will wander if you get in a hurry take your time and use high quailty bit they may cost more but will track true do you have an industrial supply store close by? i use an aul to make a small dent in the wood the bit then has an indent to start in
                  the other are right it breaks the grain
                  do a little experment get a piece of metal and try to start a hole the bit will want to off track then take a center punch and make a dimple and the bit won't wonder same with wood

                  bob

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                  • #10
                    didn’t thing they made awls that small…i get my mini bits from mike’s workshop, same place i get my blades

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                    • #11
                      Great advice from all. The combination of all your suggestions really works for me. I also find that using a high speed 1400 rpm helps keep the bit on line.

                      george
                      Last edited by sawdustus; 05-25-2012, 07:40 AM.
                      A day without sawdust is a day without sunshine.
                      George

                      delta 650, hawk G426

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                      • #12
                        I agree with getting good bits. You might also want to consider using a sharp awl (or dental pick, or another sharp pointy tool) and press into the point where you want the bit to start. This should keep the bit from wondering.

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