Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

110 v to 220 v - need electrical help converting a Dewalt 788

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 110 v to 220 v - need electrical help converting a Dewalt 788

    When it comes to electrical issues my sum knowledge of the subject can be written on a piece of toilet paper and then flushed for what good it is! Please - I need help from any electricians in our member base.

    I have a Dewalt saw I bought in Italy several months back. Its a Type 1 Model DW-788-QS fitted with a 230v 50 Hz 0.4amp 75 watt motor running 450- 1750 spm (thats not a typo for rpm - it does say spm!)

    I want to run it back home in Mexico which is the same 110 v power supply as in the US and Canada

    An electrician at the factory here in Italy told me I could probably run it from a step up converter but he wasn't 100% sure. I found a link to a supplier of what seem to be suitable converters but would like someone in the know to to tell me if these are what I need. The page link is

    Region Free DVD Players, PAL/NTSC LCD TV, 110/220 Volt Appliances & Electronics

    As I also have a 220 volt Dremel which I'd like to save which is rated at 125 watt I'm thinking that a 300 watt converter would serve my needs with some power in hand but am a little confused here that the saw motor is rated a lot lower than the Dremel.

    Can someone please confirm if what I'm looking at will work, what size will I need and will I have any problems with the speed controller board on the saw or do I need to change that.

    Note - I've looked at buying a new motor from the USA but at 205 USD plus 120 USD shipping to Mexico plus the possibility of being hit with 30% import duties I'm trying to find a more economical solution.

    Failing this I'll remove the darn motor, convert it to a tooth pulley drive mechanism and run the saw indirectly by belt from a locally bought variable speed industrial sewing machine motor.
    Am I kidding? Not me - LOL!

    Thanks in advance for any help
    Last edited by jim_mex; 04-01-2012, 07:00 AM.
    Jim in Mexico

    Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
    - Albert Einstein

  • #2
    Find out what type of motor it is. It could be as simple as changing where the jumpers on the motor go. I purchased a potatoes grating machine in Lithuania and all it need was to change the jumpers for the US.

    Comment


    • #3
      Jim try sending a PM to Stoney he's a retired electrician, and helped me with an electrical issue once.
      Scroll Saw Woodworking & Crafts Message Board - View Profile: Stoney
      Gloria ............... Two memorable things to say in life, "Hello" for the first time, and "Good-bye" for the last.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Jim, just saw your post. A step up/down transformer like the one on the site you linked should do just fine. Like oldvaxguy said you may be able to alter the lead positions on the the motor tappings, drop DeWalt an e-mail and ask if it can be done. Also you could see if a local firm could re-wind your motor for you, it shouldn't be an expensive job. I know you're not kidding about the conversion, you're very resourceful, but I hope it don't come to that. The dremel is probably rated higher because of the very high speeds it can achieve. Good luck mate. Sounds like you're nearing the end of your "Italian Job" Jim and will soon be back home with Norma and Kevin. Thanks for all the posts and wonderful pics you have shown us. Take care.
        Mick
        I am always ready to learn although I do not always like being taught. Winston Churchill

        Comment


        • #5
          Jim-
          I know as much about Mexican electricity as I do about space flight, but here is a thought.

          Up north here, our houses are fed at 220 and the switch box provides a 220 feed for electric ranges and dryers, etc, while splitting the two 110 feeds coming in to allow for "lower" voltage devices such as the ever important scroll saw and sanders.

          Don't know if Mexican power is connected the same way, but it might be as simple as having someone put in the correct plug and wire it back to the fuse/breaker/switchbox.
          Jim
          When looking at the clock at work--the correct time is:
          Too early to leave, too late to call in.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks folks for the answers.

            I'm now pretty sure that the converter is the way to go and I've managed to source a supplier in Mexico who can provide one for around 100 USD which is a considerable saving on my other options.

            Just to answer Jim's comment about power supplies. In Mexico the power supply to homes is very basic. In established residential areas the main supply is usually in the form of 4 overhead cables running down the street which consist of 3 x 120v cables plus one neutral. The power company will tap into one 120v and the neutral and run a cable from them to your meter. If you want to run a 220v supplier they will run a similar cable to a separate meter but take from two of the 120v lines. The only problem with asking them for this service is that they charge a heck of a lot for you having a second meter and you pay a steep rental whether you use it of not.

            In the old days when electrical companies were less vigilant it was easy for resourceful individuals to make a neat hook up pole and 'steal' from two of the 120v cables to obtain a 220v supply - usually at night when no one was around! - illegal yes - dangerous, sometimes - Mexican workaround, definitely - LOL!

            Although I may have used that route in the past I definitely prefer to be legal these days!

            Thanks again for the answers and comments
            Jim in Mexico

            Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
            - Albert Einstein

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a Dewalt saw I bought in Italy several months back. Its a Type 1 Model DW-788-QS fitted with a 230v 50 Hz 0.4amp 75 watt motor running 450- 1750 spm (thats not a typo for rpm - it does say spm!)

              it is the 50 HZ that concerns me. In the US we use 60 HZ I believe.
              Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,
              "No PHD, just a DD 214"

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Jim Finn View Post
                it is the 50 HZ that concerns me. In the US we use 60 HZ I believe.
                We do use 60 Hertz on this side, but it should only have minimal effect. I remember the old turntables had a strobe for tuning the speed of the platter and there were marking for both 50 Hz and 60Hz. The saw might run just about 12% faster or get a little warmer at full speed.

                Now, if he bought a fancy plug in analog clock--that would be a different story, like gaining one minute an hour.
                Jim
                When looking at the clock at work--the correct time is:
                Too early to leave, too late to call in.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well, Jim, it sounds like you have a plan. Know what I would have done? Bought a new saw. HA That was a joke son. Hope you can convert & enjoy both tools when you finally get settled in. Take Care
                  PERK

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hey Jim. Here's a thought , your so close to the Vatican perhaps they can do a conversion for you.

                    Roger

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Wood Dog View Post
                      Jim try sending a PM to Stoney he's a retired electrician, and helped me with an electrical issue once.
                      Scroll Saw Woodworking & Crafts Message Board - View Profile: Stoney
                      Hi Jim,

                      The converter you are considering should do the job fine. Some of the motors

                      manufactured today are already rated 50 or 60 Hz. The internal motor winding

                      connections could be changed but I would go with the converter it is probably

                      the most cost efficient, besides then you can go either way. Who Knows you may

                      want to run on 220 volt 50 Hz sometime.
                      Last edited by Stoney; 04-03-2012, 05:48 PM.
                      Stoney aka Al

                      This gettin old stuff ain't for sissies!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks Al - for the added words of advice. Appreciate your reply.
                        Now all it seems I have to do is get this Yellah stowed away in my check in luggage which I think will be a bigger problem than converting the motor!!
                        Jim in Mexico

                        Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
                        - Albert Einstein

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Since you have a type 1 wired for Europe (220V) and I have a Type 2 wired for the US and Mexico (110V), we could have swapped saws instead of using a converter (you) and transformer (me). But I think the converter is much cheaper than physically moving the saws between Verona and Valnesfjord - LOL.

                          The fun part of my transformer, is that it originates from an American made printer! The Terminet printers made by GE for the American market, was simply converted for the European market (and may be the Canadian as well), by installing a transformer inside the housing. The original powercord was connected to the transformer on the inside, and a new powercord just went to the transformer. Nothing done to change between 50/60Hz, and the printers worked just fine. - But I remember sailors buying tape recorders in the US learning a sad lesson about the difference between 50 and 60 Hz ....
                          Ivar ("treslakter" - read as "woodbutcher")

                          The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time. (Friedrich Nietzsche)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Jim -- Please be careful of converters. While they will drop 23oVAC or 240VAC down to 110-120VAC They do nothing for the cyclic rate of the current. The European standard is 50Hretz or 50 Cycles per minute while the North American Standard (US/Canada/Mexico) is 60 Hertz. That cyclic rate can burn up a motor in a short time and you will be buying a new motor anyway.

                            I spent 9 years in Europe, courtesy of the US Army, and we had constant problems with the power conversion and electric motors. While I could take a refrigerator to Germany, I couldn't take washers & dryers, because of what the 50Hertz current would do to them.

                            Although we did experiment with a fan, one time. In 15 minutes, the motor was too hot to touch, 10 minutes later for smoking, and dead in a few minutes after that.

                            Be Careful with conversion devices. I had a friend who even burned up his shaver using one of those. Got a little warm to the cheeks.

                            Tony

                            Originally posted by jim_mex View Post
                            Thanks folks for the answers.

                            I'm now pretty sure that the converter is the way to go and I've managed to source a supplier in Mexico who can provide one for around 100 USD which is a considerable saving on my other options.

                            Just to answer Jim's comment about power supplies. In Mexico the power supply to homes is very basic. In established residential areas the main supply is usually in the form of 4 overhead cables running down the street which consist of 3 x 120v cables plus one neutral. The power company will tap into one 120v and the neutral and run a cable from them to your meter. If you want to run a 220v supplier they will run a similar cable to a separate meter but take from two of the 120v lines. The only problem with asking them for this service is that they charge a heck of a lot for you having a second meter and you pay a steep rental whether you use it of not.

                            In the old days when electrical companies were less vigilant it was easy for resourceful individuals to make a neat hook up pole and 'steal' from two of the 120v cables to obtain a 220v supply - usually at night when no one was around! - illegal yes - dangerous, sometimes - Mexican workaround, definitely - LOL!

                            Although I may have used that route in the past I definitely prefer to be legal these days!

                            Thanks again for the answers and comments
                            The good woodworker does not craft the wood for honor. He uses his craft to honor the wood.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tgiro View Post
                              Jim -- Please be careful of converters. While they will drop 23oVAC or 240VAC down to 110-120VAC They do nothing for the cyclic rate of the current. The European standard is 50Hretz or 50 Cycles per minute while the North American Standard (US/Canada/Mexico) is 60 Hertz. That cyclic rate can burn up a motor in a short time and you will be buying a new motor anyway.

                              I spent 9 years in Europe, courtesy of the US Army, and we had constant problems with the power conversion and electric motors. While I could take a refrigerator to Germany, I couldn't take washers & dryers, because of what the 50Hertz current would do to them.

                              Although we did experiment with a fan, one time. In 15 minutes, the motor was too hot to touch, 10 minutes later for smoking, and dead in a few minutes after that.

                              Be Careful with conversion devices. I had a friend who even burned up his shaver using one of those. Got a little warm to the cheeks.

                              Tony

                              Its a different ball game running a 60hz designed motor on 50hz supply than

                              running a 50hz motor on 60 hz supply. Hertz or hz refers to cycles per

                              second.


                              Running a 60hz motor on 50hz will cause the motor to run slower and thus

                              create more heat which helps explain the problems Tony discribed.

                              Running Jim's saw with a converter means his saw will still be running the

                              same voltage 220 volts but at 60hz which will cause the motor to run

                              faster which I believe should not create a major problem.
                              Stoney aka Al

                              This gettin old stuff ain't for sissies!

                              Comment

                              Unconfigured Ad Widget

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              • NC Scroller
                                Reply to Shrink wrap systems
                                by NC Scroller
                                My process is a bit different. Since I am using heat shrink bags when you seal the open end you trap a lot of air in them. When you start to heat the bag to shrink it you create a large bubble. I continue to heat the bag until it does pop a hole. I have been doing this for years. The shrink wrap...
                                Today, 07:42 AM
                              • will8989
                                Reply to Shrink wrap systems
                                by will8989
                                None Linda. You need to find the right heat temp so it shrinks but doesn’t put a hole in the wrap but the tape doesn’t shrink or tear.
                                Today, 12:20 AM
                              • Linda In Phoenix
                                Reply to Shrink wrap systems
                                by Linda In Phoenix
                                What thickness of film seems to work the best for puzzles?
                                The bags seem easier on the surface.
                                But the film seems like it is more versatile on size variations.
                                Yesterday, 03:24 PM
                              • will8989
                                Reply to Bruce, the one on probation
                                by will8989
                                Regulations are 150 square feet, this will be 144 square feet so we are good. He’s making it that size Since the sheets are 4’ wide. And the Shelves need to be 4” above my head!! It will be very specific.
                                Yesterday, 10:32 AM
                              • Sandy Oaks
                                Reply to Shrink wrap systems
                                by Sandy Oaks
                                As a framer, we have a shrinker wrapper at ArtCrafters. Very simple. Film on a roller, sealer attached, just roll off enough film, seal the film, insert object, seal other end and shrink with a heat gum. We also use Uline as a source. Not sure where our unit can from as it was with the shop when...
                                Yesterday, 09:46 AM
                              Working...
                              X