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  • History Question

    I have seen the early scroll saws (pre 1950) had a cast solid upper arm with a spring (like a valve spring) where the blade attaches. Under the table is a oil filled casting with a crank shaft mechanism to give the vertical blade movement.

    The design concept seems bullet proof and having a blade with perfect vertical movement would be normal.

    Anybody know why the change over to the designs of today?

    Steve.
    Steve.
    EX-16, DW-788, Dremel 1680

  • #2
    Too many variables in the blade tension as the spring compressed.
    Rolf
    RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
    Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
    Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
    And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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    • #3
      The blades were approximately the size of what we now call saber saw blades; tight turns and extremely fine work were not possible. I well remember using one of these machines in shop class- not much fun. A couple of these saws were allegedly modified to use blades of modern dimension, but these machines supposedly broke the modern thin blades too frequently to be useful.

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      • #4
        Check this on Steve Good's forum;
        History of the scroll saw, plus other information
        FD Mike
        SD Mike

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        • #5
          I remember using a saw like that in shop class in 1953 and we called it a "jig saw". I think the modern, hand held, jig saw had not been developed then, not sure.
          Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,
          "No PHD, just a DD 214"

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