Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Need Help with Blades

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Need Help with Blades

    What blade is a good blade to cut 3/4" thick oak. I have been cutting 3/4 thick pine, poplar and aspen and have been using a FD-UR No.5 and it cuts great. I tried using this blade on the oak and I am have a hard time cutting. I am burning up the blades. I also tried the FD-SR No.5 and No.3 and had the same problem. What blade do you use to cut 3/4 thick oak? Thanks for any help....Mark

  • #2
    Try an Olson PGt 5 or 7
    Rolf
    RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
    Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
    Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
    And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

    Comment


    • #3
      I will assume you are using a new sharp blade to make this cut. IMHO a number 5 is just too lite for 3/4 stock. I would move up to a #7 or #9 in the blade types you mentioned. I would also apply clear packing tape to both sides of the wood. That should reduce the burning.
      Scott
      Creator of fine designer sawdust.

      Comment


      • #4
        There seems to be a prejudice against using larger size blades. That's really unfortunate.

        If you have hard, thick wood that doesn't require making sharp curves, the FD-UR 9 and the FD-R 12 are extremely aggressive. Tape never hurts, also, and change blades often.
        Carole

        Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

        Comment


        • #5
          The FD-UR # 7 would be good. To help with eliminating burning. Use the 2" clear package tape on top of the pattern. Some use the blue painters tape on the wood with pattern on top.
          FD Mike
          SD Mike

          Comment


          • #6
            In my opinion, the question boils down to expectations. Pine, poplar & aspen are fairly soft, so if you are used to cutting these woods, you have been conditioned to certain expectations of the blade's performance. If you are trying to use the same feed rate with oak as with these softer woods, that may be as much of a contributing factor to the problem as the size & type of blade.

            I routinely stack cut hardwoods in thicknesses up to 3/4" with smaller blades, normally a #3 or even a #2. I would think that a #5 would do fine in 3/4" oak, as long as you compensate by slowing down your feed rate accordingly. For me, the pattern helps determine the blade size as much as type and thickness of material. If the pattern permits, by all means try a larger blade as it will cut faster. But, if the pattern has tight turns and a high degree of fine detail, you are better off with a smaller blade. The trade off is that it will cut slower and dull faster, but the results will probably be better.
            Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

            Comment


            • #7
              I agree with you Bill, Most of my work has lots of fine details so I tend to use much smaller blades than most.
              Rolf
              RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
              Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
              Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
              And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

              Comment


              • #8
                I agree with Bill and Rolf. A smaller blade will still cut oak you just have to let it. If you cant' change your cutting habits the m ove up to a larger blade like the FD ur#7 or 9
                "Still Montana Mike"

                "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
                Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for the advice. I am still very new at this so I guess I need to use less feed with the smaller blades. I am cutting a puzzle so I figured I needed to use the smaller blade. I changed the blade for often. I went thru about 12 blades cutting the same puzzle I cut out of pine and only used 2 blades for it. Thanks for the advice I will keep practicing. Mark

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Mark, Some are talking about lower speed. With lower speed you might have a tendency to start pushing too hard into the blade, this will make the blade cut with a bevel. I feel that I have much better control with higher speed. Just push slow into the blade. Let the blade do the cutting, they say.
                    Try it both ways and see what is the best for you.
                    FD Mike
                    SD Mike

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I could have been more clear. The speed is the feed rate of your wood not the speed of the saw. Oak is a difficult choice for puzzles as it is fragile and can have very sharp splinters. I'd stick with some softer woods, like poplar and cherry and mahogany.
                      "Still Montana Mike"

                      "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
                      Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I agree with just about everyone here...I seem to use #5 and #7 blades in nearly everything I cut. Oh I will try smaller blades at first, and find I end up changing back. When I need to use Polar blades I may step down to a #3. But in Oak and woods like that I stick with at least a #5..works best for me. It may just be the way I have learned to cut, but I always have my saw (Hegner) at full speed and then slow the feed rate as I cut. On corners slow down a bit more so not to burn the wood. If I an stack cutting, I will use clear packing tape or blue painter tape under the pattern over and around the wood...this seems to lube the blade and holds the wood together when cutting. Remember, you can always use packing tape..don't have to be stack cutting...just makes it cut smoother.
                        Hawaiilad
                        Larry

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          For cutting puzzles, you probably want to stick with the smallest blade you can. Too big of a kerf will make for kind of a sloppy fit.
                          Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks for all the advice. I have only been at this for a few months and I still have alot to learn. But all the help from everybody here has made the learning alot easier. Thanks Everyone.....Mark

                            Comment

                            Unconfigured Ad Widget

                            Collapse

                            Latest Topics

                            Collapse

                            • Jim McDonald
                              Reply to Demo display
                              by Jim McDonald
                              If you just do a Google search for 3d reindeer ornament, you should get several choices....
                              Today, 03:41 PM
                            • Jim McDonald
                              Reply to Woodgrain Worked Against Me
                              by Jim McDonald
                              Woodgrain is like a straw sucking in the pigment, but I think you did a good job on a complex piece. Lots of patience for this pattern.
                              Today, 01:42 PM
                            • Rodney Brown
                              Reply to Woodgrain Worked Against Me
                              by Rodney Brown
                              Thanks Rolf,
                              I actually tried painting the inside of the cuts before removing the pattern and tape. I initially used packing tape because I was out of painters tape. When I sprayed the cuts, apparently the paint bled into the fibers of the wood. But I have to say I have been redeemed by my wife....
                              Today, 12:56 PM
                            • Rolf
                              Reply to Woodgrain Worked Against Me
                              by Rolf
                              Nice project, I really like the design. You did use a tough piece of material, I would normally suggest cutting at least 3 layers of 1/8 BB because you will get requests of them. I am curious as to why you got some black bleeding into the grain? Is this mounted on a black backer ?
                              Today, 08:56 AM
                            • Rodney Brown
                              Woodgrain Worked Against Me
                              by Rodney Brown
                              This is my latest project and I'm still up in the air about it. The wood was reclaimed from a table that someone had thrown away. It is 3/4 MDF with veneer on both sides. The project is 11 x 14 and is pretty heavy. The pattern was from "Grandpa" and I believe his real name is Paul. I used...
                              Yesterday, 09:31 PM
                            Working...
                            X