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  • Sanding Mop Help

    i need help picking out a sanding mop.
    i do a lot of scrolling with fretwork and i have
    been sanding all edges to remove fuzzies by hand and
    i takes way to much time and i have read a sanding mop
    is the way to go but i see there is 4" and 6" and single mops
    and double mops and i have no clue which one to go with?

    not sure what a good grit is to use so i dont eat up to much
    wood when getting in the tight spots?

    is there a certain brand that is better then others?


    + + I Love The Smell Of Sawdust In The Morning + +

  • #2
    There is one called the mac mop I think. Look on klingspors site. I have one and like it.
    "Still Montana Mike"

    "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
    Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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    • #3
      I also have looked at the mops and was wondering which is best for Intarsia?

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      • #4
        Thier Sand paper strips the lenght is the diameter with a hole punched in the center,mounted on a mandrel ,usually 48 strips per mop progressively off set to form a circle mounted back to back ,you will get instruction ,assembly required.They work great grit of paper chosen ,plus pressure applied ,provide the agressiveness .what you sand with by hand or hand sander will give you idea of what grit to order 4" to 6" heft and mass of
        what you are going to sand. One other major thing speed of motor also plays a major part in it"s aggression or lack there of.if your going horizontal in a drill press you can control that
        on most.Either by belt pulley changes ,some with rheostat ,if your mounting to a motor directly ,note the rpms cheaper H.F.buffing wheel motors are high speed not a lot of power ,will stall easily ,but are high speed and are not very forgiving on fragile stuff .
        I would definitly recommend slower speed ,at least till you get used to it.
        I bought three different sizes ,Then made an 8"out of 2"w 80 grit emmery belts for big stuff
        You can do a lot with them ,but like every thing that turns wear safety glass's no loose clothing ,because sooner or later it will grab something ,and it's always when you least expect it. Just be careful ,they are safe as long as you respect them.you will want to wear a mask ,they can make a ton of micro-fine dust .

        My very best!
        Carl
        "Home Of The Dust Free Scroll Saw"
        Remember (IT is WHAT it IS)( Unless YOU change IT!)

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        • #5
          I use Klingspor's sanding mops all the time. Definitely at the slowest drill press speed possible. Fast speeds just polish the wood. I usually use 180 grit mops. The double mops last longer but don't get into the smallest frets as well as the single ones. the larger the diameter of the mop, the faster the outside is spinning. Also; the lightest possible touch when using them.
          Hold tight, press light, as the mop likes to grab things and fling them across the shop. Don't push the piece into the mop, just let the mop brush the piece. It takes a little practice.
          Klingspor sells the mops and mandrels separately and you get the pleasure of assembling them. One mandrel per grit is the only way to do it.

          george
          A day without sawdust is a day without sunshine.
          George

          delta 650, hawk G426

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          • #6
            You can make your own in about 45 minutes. I bought a mandrel and made one with 180 grit and later made one with 120 grit using a 4" carriage bolt. Steve good has an instructional video on making your own. Scrollsaw Workshop: Make your own sanding mop on the cheap.
            Pat
            Woodworking is Therapy.... some of us need more therapy than others.

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            • #7
              Here is a link with several grits listed.
              SPINDLE MOUNTED MAC MOP 240 GRIT 7" X 1" | Klingspor's Woodworking Shop
              "Still Montana Mike"

              "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
              Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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              • #8
                Are you using scroll-reverse blades? They have some teeth on the bottom facing upwards. If you have a Porter Cable, or some Craftsman saws, the FD lower priced reverse blades won't work. The bottom teeth don't clear the table on the up-ward stroke. Next time you install a blade, assuming you are using a reverse blade, look from the side of your saw, not running, and see if the bottom teeth are going above the table-top. Clear as mud? That will help with a lot of fuzzies. Also, are you sanding the wood before cutting? I sand to at least 180 grit before I cut. I use a cheap 1/4 sheet sander I picked up at Walmart.And, last pointer, are you using a good grade of baltic birch? Cheaper grades tend to fuzz-up much more. I get mine from Sloan's. Excellant quality. You might not want to use a mop on delicate fretwork.
                Paul
                www.flicker.com/photos/woodworks44224

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                • #9
                  Another trick for fuzzies is to apply a couple coats of sanding sealer to the back before cutting. It stiffens the fibers and they break rather than bend, but you have to use something other than wood glue for a backing.

                  Seyco has small sanding mops they call flutter wheels that work well.
                  Got Moose?

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                  • #10
                    I use what Mike uses except I use the 2" width and I have it on a spidle at 1725 rpm.
                    It takes a bit of gentle practice but I use it on everything. Make sure to break in any new mop on some scrap wood.
                    Rolf
                    RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                    Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                    Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                    And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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                    • #11
                      I have tried using a sanding mop on intarsa and it does smooth out the surface but it does not shape the edges. I use a hand held, small, drum sander for that.
                      Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,
                      "No PHD, just a DD 214"

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                      • #12
                        Jim,
                        I have a couple of grits 120 and 240, but you are right the mops are not meant for removing large amounts of wood and general shaping. Although on the softer woods you can use them for that.( not the best solution) but for finishing and fuzz removal nothing beats them in my book.
                        Rolf
                        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Don't some use small torches to burn off the fuzzies? I'm not allowed to use fire, chainsaws or tablesaws in woodworking. Hubby is tired of going to the ER and doesn't want me to burn down the house. Guess he has a point.
                          Betty

                          "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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                          • #14
                            hey try looking at ,,the 2terrys .com, i bought a wasp sander from them for 30 bucks, and they send a free gift, i got mine from from ebay ,my free gift was a blowfly sander which you can use as a flap sander, these things are cool and worth 30 bucks, and A ussie made too

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                            • #15
                              Wock,
                              I checked out their site it appears by their accents they may be in UK or Australia it doesn't say anywhere that i could see. Look like useful items.

                              the 2 terrys - home
                              "Still Montana Mike"

                              "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
                              Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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