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  • Million Dollar Question...

    OK, it might not be a million dollars, but it seems to me - lol! However, I believe in the long run it will save me a lot of money and especially frustration of getting my projects square.

    So, to all of the great knowledgeable friends here on the forum...do you purchase an inflatable drum sander or a jointer/planer combo? As mentioned, my frustration level has hit an all time high trying to get things square/straight for my latest challenges of segmented/laminated boxes...my designer firewood box is getting deep and exspensive!

    I was at Lowe's today and saw that they just started carrying a Porter Cable 6" Jointer for $249...was so tempted, but thought I would do my homework instead. Anyway, I found a Jet JJP-8BT 8-Inch Bench Top Jointer/Planer on Amazon for $349 (free shipping) Amazon.com: Jet JJP-8BT 8-Inch Bench Top Jointer/Planer: Home Improvement. Any body have any experience with this toy (I mean tool)? My budget is no higher than $500, as all of us I would like to get the best bang for my buck AND a tool with great customer service. Oh, and I have limited space, so I am looking at bench top style.

    Any input on this would be greatly appreciated, I am hoping to buy one in the next few weeks. Thanx in Advance!!!
    ~ Kim

    A day in my shop is like a day at the beach...full of sunshine and ya never know where the sawdust may end up!

    www.gonecoastalart.com

  • #2
    Which saw did you end up with? Did you get the ex21? If it were I I'd go for a planer/jointer. I have both wish i had gotten just one combo one which is wider for the space saving.....just my 2 cents.
    "Still Montana Mike"

    "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
    Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by wood-n-things View Post
      Which saw did you end up with? Did you get the ex21? If it were I I'd go for a planer/jointer. I have both wish i had gotten just one combo one which is wider for the space saving.....just my 2 cents.
      Thanx Mike for your input! I ended up with the Ex21, as I knew I had a few more toys that I wanted and could not justify the extra money for maybe needing the extra 9" throat on just a few projects a year. I am so glad that I upgraded...hoping to have some projects to share in the next couple weeks!

      I am not familar with either tool, but like you, I like the idea of having a combo and not taking up double the space. So, that's why I thought I would ask the forum and set me on the right path.

      Thanx Again!
      ~ Kim

      A day in my shop is like a day at the beach...full of sunshine and ya never know where the sawdust may end up!

      www.gonecoastalart.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Kim

        For getting boards nice and square I would agree with Mike the jointer is a key tool. I know that space is an issue so a combo machine might be the best way to go but my experience with combo machines has not been very good. Make sure you do your homework before making a purchase, sometimes those combo machines require a lot of set up to go from one operation to the other.
        If your boards are already the thickness you need and all you are looking to do is square them up there are other tools that can do that for you and might save you some money. A straight edge and a router for example. I made a fence/jig for my table saw to work like a jointer before I was able to purchase the jointer and it worked pretty well for me. Without knowing exactly what you are trying to do and what tools you have available it is kind of hard to make a "perfect" suggestion. I do have quite a few Jet tools in the shop and have no complaints on any of them so far.
        Tim

        In God we trust, all others must pay cash!

        I don't want no bargains, they always cost me more money.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have the Dewalt 735 and its the best thing I've ever bought. It is a 13" planer but i plane boards on edge all the time (up to 6 in). I also have a jointer but it never gets used now that I have the planer. I would recommend getting a good planer and go from there.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hey Kim, Tim knows what he is talking about!! He has helped me a number of times with some tough situations.... squaring a large board on the bandsaw, changing the speed of my drill press, etc. I love my jointer, but I also have the luxury of having a planer too. So for this I am of no help!!! Do check all the reviews on any/all sites that have the ones you are interested in. I'm sure you will find just the right one!!!
            Cathy in NE

            "While we try to teach our children all about life, our children teach us what life is all about." - Anonymous

            Comment


            • #7
              Kim I just went to Amazon to check out planers. There are some real buys on Dewalt planers! A nice 12 1/2 inch bench top for 378.00. You can find it here.
              Cathy in NE

              "While we try to teach our children all about life, our children teach us what life is all about." - Anonymous

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanx everyone for your input!!! I am usually real chatty with my posts...I guess I was too quick to post as I was trying to get it sent off as the wolves were howling at me for their dinner - lol.

                I should have explained more about the reason for my new toy...like we really need an excuse - lol! For the past six months I have started making segmented rings for my scroll saw boxes and having a tough time with my glue ups. Some might be scratching their heads, so I will try to explain. This process is used a lot with woodturners (lathe) to create laminated rings and such (as a reference Amazon.com: Woodturning with Ray Allen: A Master's Designs & Techniques for Segmented Bowls & Vessels (9781565232174): Dale L Nish: Books).

                For some reason nothing in my shop seems to be square and my frustration level is pushing the limits. Tool wise, my disc sander has a bow in the center (gotta luv foreign manufacturing and poor qc), making it a chore to get a straight edge. My 12"compound miter saw (and blade) is a good one, but with mixed hardwoods the blade still bows (or maybe it's the user) when trying to cut different woods at once. My 10" table saw is not the best (looking for a new 10", 60+ tooth saw blade - any suggestions?) and have been working on creating some sleds but honestly this is one piece of equipment that makes me a lit'l nervous to operate using smaller pieces of wood. So...that is why I am looking for a jointer...to square up my cuts.

                However, there are times when a planer would come in a handy for rough cut lumber (cedar and cypress) I purchase locally needs a smooth finish and using my belt sander is very tricky. Plus, my studio is not climate controlled and I am having trouble with cupping and need a way to salvage these boards too.

                So, I thought a jointer/planer combo would be the answer. Unless I have the wrong tool, and perhaps an inflatable drum sander is what I need...that's why I was hoping someone here knew what I was talking about and could set me on the right path - ha ha!

                I hope that helps explain my search and need for a new toy, thanx in advance for the advice!
                Last edited by lkbraa; 01-21-2012, 11:56 PM.
                ~ Kim

                A day in my shop is like a day at the beach...full of sunshine and ya never know where the sawdust may end up!

                www.gonecoastalart.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  [QUOTE...A straight edge and a router for example. I made a fence/jig for my table saw to work like a jointer before I was able to purchase the jointer and it worked pretty well for me. Without knowing exactly what you are trying to do and what tools you have available it is kind of hard to make a "perfect" suggestion. I do have quite a few Jet tools in the shop and have no complaints on any of them so far.[/QUOTE]

                  Sorry Tim, I forgot to address your comments...
                  First off, thanx for your input! I tried the router...and I stink at it - ha ha! But I think the issue there was that I did not have a true straight edge and need to find something sturdier than hardwood. Then I had a gouging issue because of the difference between the hardness of the woods...once again, probably more me than the equipment. In regards to the fence/jig you made up for your table saw, do you have any plans/drawings that show how you did this that you could share? My trouble is that after the laminations I don't have atleast one side that is true, therefore anything cut after that isn't square...hope that makes sense.
                  ~ Kim

                  A day in my shop is like a day at the beach...full of sunshine and ya never know where the sawdust may end up!

                  www.gonecoastalart.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Kim

                    I have been looking for the plans I used for the jointer jig but have not found it yet. Here is a link that shows some of them just to give you some ideas 7 Table Saw Jointing Jig Plans: Straight Edge, No Jointer |
                    I did something a little different with the one I built but at least the link above will get the wheels turning while I keep looking.
                    Tim

                    In God we trust, all others must pay cash!

                    I don't want no bargains, they always cost me more money.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Kim

                      In regards to saw blades I usually use the Freud Diablo blades. Most Home Depot's carry the 80 tooth and they also carry a 96 tooth for the 12" compound miter saw. Not sure I understand what you mean by the blade bowing on your miter saw. Is your compound miter saw one the slides or is it a "fixed" base. Some of the hardwoods you need to slow the feed rate on the miter saw just a little bit, if your saw slides I usually pull it forward and cut around 1/4 the thickness of the wood while sliding it back and repeating the operation until I reach full depth. Basically making 3 or 4 passes to cut full depth.
                      Tim

                      In God we trust, all others must pay cash!

                      I don't want no bargains, they always cost me more money.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thank you, thank you, thank you Tim! I had an idea for a sled, but was not sure if my thoughts would get me the end result...I was close, but the article had some good ideas. The clamping issue was the biggest puzzle...duh...Quick Release Toggle Clamps...sometimes you just need someone to flip the switch - lol!

                        Thanx for the info on the saw blade...I had no clue what brand. Checked out Lowe's and they had a very minimal stock on hand...or atleast at the one I went to. I will take the trek to HD and check out what our local one has.

                        On my CMS it is not a slider...but I will keep your tip in mind as I am hoping to get one these days, but not on my current list of soon-to-be purchased toys. Hard to explain the 'wobble'...the blade seems to kick at the end of the cut. I have checked to make sure I have it installed correctly, checked for square and such and all seems to be true, until I cut. As I said, it is more than likely the operator and lack of clamping/hold down on the wood so my wood is kicking out versus my blade. The biggest issue is actually small...my stock is really small that I am cutting and probably shouldn't even be cut using a chop saw.

                        Once again, thanx Tim for your help. Hoping to get out and make some sawdust later this week so I will let ya know how my sled turned out.
                        ~ Kim

                        A day in my shop is like a day at the beach...full of sunshine and ya never know where the sawdust may end up!

                        www.gonecoastalart.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Kim

                          I don't know if this will help you but I had a Ryobi CMS (non-slider) and my cuts were always off a little bit so I started checking things out. I found the fence was not very true. If you take a straight piece of metal like a framing square and lay the long side against the fence my saw had about a 1/32" gap in the center. I loosened the 2 bolts closest to the blade and took a small pry bar and was able to get it straight. Have your hubby help because an extra set of hands is useful when doing it. If you don't want to pry you can also take some cardboard from a cereal box and shim the piece out while cutting.
                          Give the saw a good looking over I'm sure you will find the problem.
                          Tim

                          In God we trust, all others must pay cash!

                          I don't want no bargains, they always cost me more money.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Kim

                            Here is a picture of a model of the jointer fence I made. I made a simple box and attached a piece of hard board to the outside face. If I were going to make another one I would probably make the piece that clamps to the saw fence longer and then use 3 pieces of wood for the top of the box, leaving 2 open areas for clamping to the saw fence. I used the Quickgrip type of clamps. The other nice thing is with the box you can make it any size you want and just use your saw fence for a quick and easy setup. Also one more tip put a little bevel on the leading edge of the hard board.

                            Now for the real dilemma what are you going to do with the extra money you just saved? LOL If you are still thinking of a planer I would go with at least a 13" model like the Dewalt 735, I have the Rigid right now and it has been alright but not great. When I upgrade I will probably go with the Powermatic 20" but that is not in the price range. I have the Powermatic 6" jointer and it could be used to plane boards to thickness but only up to 6" wide. That being said the results would not be the same as using the planer because the planer has rollers that keep the pressure on the wood constant where the jointer you have to keep moving your hands to apply pressure.

                            Good luck with your decision, and let us know what you come up with.
                            Attached Files
                            Tim

                            In God we trust, all others must pay cash!

                            I don't want no bargains, they always cost me more money.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I started out with the same dilemma as you - jointer or planer. I wound up with the Jet 10-inch jointer/planer combo and LOVE IT! Not having to pay for and find room for two machines was a big part of it. It does a GREAT job planing Ipe, which is pretty hard wood. The change-over from using planer to jointer requires a couple of easy steps, but is not a big issue. I'm really pleased that I went for the combination machine.

                              Comment

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