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  • Bandsaw

    So here is my problem. This Christmas my parents blessed me with a band saw. It is a 12 inch Craftsman with a 6 in cutting thickness (max). I have asked in the past about band saws and it has been greatly recommended that I get a 14in, along with a few other things. The main reason I wanted the saw was for resawing and I am having some problems with the tracking, therefore problems with resawing. Should I try to make do with it as a starter saw or do I upgrade it now. Is it really worth having a top notch band saw?

    Any thoughts would be appreciated! Thanks!

  • #2
    Have you read this.

    Correcting Band Saw Drift - NewWoodworker.com LLC

    It's all fun
    Terry
    Craftsman 18"
    Delta 46-460 lathe
    ________________________

    https://www.facebook.com/SillyLillyBowsAndMore

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    • #3
      Bandsaw Setup, Tuneup, Blade Recommendations, and Rust Prevention | The Wood Whisperer

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      • #4
        It really is dependant on what you want to resaw.
        Terry is right make sure your saw is "tuned up".
        But I find that most of the small bench top band saws are a bit anemic in the horse power department. Also because they have a small throat they have smaller wheels which means a thinner more flexible blade which will wander more readily than a say a 1/2" or 3/4 in wide blade.
        So if it were me I would take it back and buy a decent 14" with a riser.
        Rolf
        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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        • #5
          I agree with Rolf. If you can afford a 14" with a riser, buy it. I use a couple Delta's...one with a riser and like them very much.
          Hawaiilad
          Larry

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          • #6
            I agree with the last two. I started with a cheapo (sure it was a Craftsman) with three wheels. More problem than it was worth. Got a good one from Grizzly and all the difference in the world and this has been ten years ago.
            Chuck D


            When a work lifts your spirits and inspires bold and noble thoughts in you, do not look for any other standard to judge by: the work is good, the product of a master craftsman.
            Jean De La Bruyere...

            l
            Hegner 18, Delta p-20, Griz 14 inch Band saw

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            • #7
              If you are primarily interested in resawing, then you will most likely be chronically disappointed in the smaller saw. They just aren't made for that. Even a 14" needs to be tuned very well and have a sharp blade on it to get decent results when resawing. I have a 14' Grizzly and truth be told, if I were in the market again, I would seriously look to a larger saw with a larger motor. Not telling you that you won't be happy with the 14", just that it helps to understand that they aren't necessarily the be-all and end-all for resawing.

              When I bought the Grizz, I wasn't sure how much I'd use it for resawing, but that is just about all it gets used for. I'm not particularily crazy about the riser kits. I think they are a compromise and resawing 10" - 12" wide stock is pushing the limits of most 14" saws. They can do the job and under ideal conditions do a pretty good job, but my ultimate goal would be something like a 17" saw with a minimum 2HP motor. Ideal isn't necessarily affordable though, so I'll stick with my 14" for now, but an upgrade is on the wish list.
              Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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              • #8
                Rikon makes a very nice 14" with 13" resaw without the need for a riser. It also has a 1 1/2hp motor.. But keep in mind you'll pay a little more for a Rikon.

                RIKON Power Tools

                They also just came out with an upgraded version as well ..

                with a larger motor and Brake.

                Bill's right.. It depends on how much re-sawing you'll be doing.

                and size of the material that your working with..

                Bigger is always better with a bandsaw. and you'll pay for that luxury too.

                good luck with your decision.

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                • #9
                  I just got that Rikon saw you're talking about. I'm going to put a new timberwolf resaw blade on tomorrow and will try some resawing in the upcoming week. I'm keeping my fingers crossed. How are you most of you resawing? Are you using a resaw bar or just pushing along the fence. From what i read, if you just use the fence you have to make sure to account for the angle of the blade drift otherwise you won't get good results. Any opinions on which way to resaw is better? I'm going to be resawing wood that is 10-12 inches.

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                  • #10
                    I have likely made every error know in trying to get thin boards out of thick boards with a 14" saw and riser. I use the original fence, maybe 3" high. I was trying to keep the thin side against the fence until I saw a UTube video showing cutting veneer stock with the thin piece outside the blade and the remaining stock between the blade and fence. I work on Alder and Maple, especially Maple burl pieces.

                    I have a collection of tapered Alder that would make someone some fine wedges, but I am getting better. Any guide intended for resaw would have to reduce the learning curve. Timberwolf blades are a great improvement on others I have tried.

                    I tried to start on 10" and taller pieces, should have spent time on 6" and smaller just to get the hang of it. But when I get it right it sure is wonderful, and has more than paid for itself..
                    Got Moose?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sawdust11703 View Post
                      I just got that Rikon saw you're talking about. I'm going to put a new timberwolf resaw blade on tomorrow and will try some resawing in the upcoming week. I'm keeping my fingers crossed. How are you most of you resawing? Are you using a resaw bar or just pushing along the fence. From what i read, if you just use the fence you have to make sure to account for the angle of the blade drift otherwise you won't get good results. Any opinions on which way to resaw is better? I'm going to be resawing wood that is 10-12 inches.
                      I have had bad luck with timberwolf blades. I have found that wood slicer blades to be far and away superior. You can get them here:
                      Wood Slicer Bandsaw Blade | Custom Length Bandsaw Blades
                      Scott
                      Creator of fine designer sawdust.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by sawdust11703 View Post
                        I just got that Rikon saw you're talking about. I'm going to put a new timberwolf resaw blade on tomorrow and will try some resawing in the upcoming week. I'm keeping my fingers crossed. How are you most of you resawing? Are you using a resaw bar or just pushing along the fence. From what i read, if you just use the fence you have to make sure to account for the angle of the blade drift otherwise you won't get good results. Any opinions on which way to resaw is better? I'm going to be resawing wood that is 10-12 inches.
                        To get good and consistent results resawing on a bandsaw, you need to have the saw adjusted and tuned very well. There is little margin for error. Accurately resawing 10+" wide boards requires that the saw be set-up precisely and the blade be not only sharp, but be tensioned correctly and have the proper tooth configuration. The wider the blade the better, to a point. The maximum width that most 14" bandsaws can handle is 1/2". A 3/4" wide resaw blade requires more HP and more tension than most 14" saws are capable of, but some are able to use them.

                        As for re-saw fences, there are those who say that a perfectly tuned saw with a good blade should not drift. Personally, I've never achieved this level of perfection, so I use a home-made, supplemental fence that allows me to compensate for drift. It's simply a wide piece of plywood, mounted vertically with screws and wing nuts, to my existing bandsaw fence. In the center, just ahead of the blade, I attached a vertical block about 1 1/2" wide or so that is beveled to a point on one edge. This edge is what the board will ride against. The width of the block allows me to pivot the board and angle it slightly, once I determine how much drift I'm getting. For me, it can vary from board to board. I've resawn one board and had to adjust for drift, then picked up another board of the same species and was able to run it through almost straight with the fence. I have no explanation for this phenomena, but it's happened to me more than once.

                        If you are really interested in getting the most from your bandsaw, here is a good book you may want to consider.

                        The Bandsaw Book by Lonnie Bird - Woodworking - Books - Taunton Store
                        Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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                        • #13
                          Thanks Terry Jay and Bill for your info. I never realized when I was buying a bandsaw how involved it would be to get good cuts out of it. My goal was to save a lot of money by resawing my own wood rather than buy online. I hope I don't have too many problems where I start wasting money.

                          Scott, I have a friend in another state who told me about the woodslicer blades and how the people in his scrolling club love them. The people in my scrolling club seem to like the timberwolf. I haven't used either yet. What exactly were the problems you were having with the timberwolf blades so I can be on the look out for them. Also what in your opinion makes you feel the woodslicer to be much better. Thanks.

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                          • #14
                            I had been using Timberwolf blades, but wasn't really all that impressed with them. I recently started buying blades from a local saw sharpening shop. They use Lennox bands and cut them to whatever length I want. Big advantage was that they were 1/2 the price and if I was in the area, I could just pick them up and save shipping costs. So far they seem to cut better and longer than the TW blades I was used to. I've never tried Woodslicer blades, but have read a lot of positive reviews of them on other woodworking forums. But then again, TW blades are also widely recommended, as well, so YMMV.
                            Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by sawdust11703 View Post
                              Thanks Terry Jay and Bill for your info. I never realized when I was buying a bandsaw how involved it would be to get good cuts out of it. My goal was to save a lot of money by resawing my own wood rather than buy online. I hope I don't have too many problems where I start wasting money.

                              Scott, I have a friend in another state who told me about the woodslicer blades and how the people in his scrolling club love them. The people in my scrolling club seem to like the timberwolf. I haven't used either yet. What exactly were the problems you were having with the timberwolf blades so I can be on the look out for them. Also what in your opinion makes you feel the woodslicer to be much better. Thanks.

                              I have had brand new Timberwolf blades come out of the box with cracked and or crocked welds. They do not last as long, cut as clean or as fast as the wood slicer.
                              Scott
                              Creator of fine designer sawdust.

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