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  • Using a Dremel as a drill press

    Scrollers,
    I'm looking at getting a Dremel tool and workstation/plunge router base for my daughter to use as a small drill press. For those of you who have this set-up I have a couple of questions:
    1. How does the Dremel hold on to the bit? Does it have a collet (like a router) or an adjustable jaw (like a drill)?
    2. If it's adjustable, what range of drill sizes will it take?
    3. I don't have one (obviously - from the first 2 questions), but it seems it would spin awfully fast for drilling. Do they have an adjustable speed model or does it not matter?
    4. Does the workstation or the plunge base work better?

    TIA for your help.
    Bruce
    . . . because each piece will be someone's heirloom someday.
    visit sometime
    Hawk 220VS, Delta 40-570

  • #2
    I've used the Dremel in the workstation as a mini-drill press and it works beautifully for doing things like pilot holes for fretwork. The workstation is designed for that purpose. I have used up to 1/8" drill without difficulty.

    There are a set of different sized sleeves that fit as collets in the Dremel that are used to adapt for different size bits. A collar screws on over these insets and holds them and the drill bit in place.

    Jan

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    • #3
      Bruce,

      I have one and no problems with bits slipping.

      I use one of these Dremel Multi Chuck: Amazon.co.uk: DIY & Tools instead of keep changing (should I say losing?) collets.

      I find the plunge station better as it saves you moving the wood, you can just run along the piece and ...
      Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

      Comment


      • #4
        I use the Dremel (mine has a variable speed function) as a drill press. There are actually at least three different setups - one is the drill press "attachment" which holds the tool in a vertical position and lowers it with a lever on the side. Another is an handle attachment that will allow you to hold the tool vertically and maneuver with the use of two side handles. The third is a device you attach to a workbench and load the Dremel tool upside down, as a router table.

        The router attachments are chucked the same way as any of the other cutters, sanders, grinders -- just be certain you have the correct size collet.

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        • #5
          I have an older 100+ model dremel, and have been unable to find the older bench press that fits it. I contacted Dremel but got no response mainly in order to see if they had a conversion fitting for the new press, as I believe the newer press only accomodates the 200+ models and upwards.

          So I did some paruseing of Youtube and saw some ideas. I decided to make one from timber and some old drawer runners. When its lighter tomorrow I will take a pic of it. It's nearly finnished, just needs a couple of tweaks.

          Sunlion
          Last edited by Sunlion; 12-06-2011, 02:52 PM. Reason: edited typos
          The Journey Is Everything.

          http://www.sunlion-pyrography.co.uk/

          My Google+

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          • #6
            I think I have been using a dremel for more than 12 or so years to punch holes for scrolling. I think I am on my second one. I cannot add to what the others have said and I can affirm that they are wonderful. I don't think I could think of a better or more useful tool for the scroll sawer.

            John
            I've Got A Lot More To Learn
            About Leaving Battlegrounds Alone
            "~~ Molly Venter

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            • #7
              here is a picture of my attempt at a dremel press. Need to get some rubber to protect it in the clamp and stop any free movement fron there. Otherwise it seems okay.

              I made it as a challenge as much as anything else as I am woodwork challenged myself at best hehe. Since then my micro bit, drill bits and blades have arrived from mike's so I may just use my Kinzo anyhow, but I will keep my heath robinson masterpiece for emergency.
              Attached Files
              The Journey Is Everything.

              http://www.sunlion-pyrography.co.uk/

              My Google+

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              • #8
                I use the dremel on the plunger router base all the time. BTW my SEARS brands dremel type tool fits the base perfectly. Never had a bit loosen up. One secret is to only expose enough bit to do the job. Too much bit will tend to distort the holes.
                Scott
                Creator of fine designer sawdust.

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                • #9
                  Thanx all for your input. No one addressed the speed issue, so I'm going to assume that either single or multi-speed models work for drilling and work equally well.

                  [QUOTE=Mayo Farmer;384105]I use one of these Dremel Multi Chuck: Amazon.co.uk: DIY & Tools instead of keep changing (should I say losing?) collets.[QUOTE]

                  Mayo Farmer, I really like the chuck you pictured. Does it hold the really small bits (eg. #60 or #70) or would I still need a separate mini-chuck?
                  Bruce
                  . . . because each piece will be someone's heirloom someday.
                  visit sometime
                  Hawk 220VS, Delta 40-570

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by millwab View Post
                    Mayo Farmer, I really like the chuck you pictured. Does it hold the really small bits (eg. #60 or #70) or would I still need a separate mini-chuck?
                    Not sure Bruce, the smallest I use is a #63. No problems so far.

                    I have an adjustable speed Dremel - for drilling I generally just slide all the way up to 3000 rpm - sanding quite a bit less.
                    Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

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                    • #11
                      I also use the Dremel Workstation and micro chuck.For speed as above,wide open.
                      Tony

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