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What blades to use in stack cutting?

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  • What blades to use in stack cutting?

    I'm planning to stack cut about 5 or 6 pieces of 1/8" thick veneer (I'm making ornaments). I was planning on nailing the stack to a 1/4" pieces of wood for a backer.

    My question is what are the guidelines for the type of blade suggested to use when stack cutting? Both the number of teeth, plus the type of blade (reverse, etc.).

    Many thanks!

  • #2
    With the backer you are up to almost a full inch. So I'd be using a number 7 ultra reverse. Why a 1/4" backer? You don't need it and then you can go back to a #5 ur.
    "Still Montana Mike"

    "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
    Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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    • #3
      I for one would not use the backer at all , and I use the # 3 when I stack cut four layers of 1/8" material . ..............MB
      Usually busier than a cat in a sandbox !!!!!!!!!!! MB { Dewalt 788 only }

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      • #4
        I wouldnt use a backer either, you shouldnt need it. Be sure your stack is tightly fastened together, use a layer of clear packing, or blue painters tape on the top surface under your pattern.I would go with a #3 Flying D two way cut blade, unless the design isnt real intricate, if thats the case, you could get by with a FD-TC #5
        Dale w/ yella saws

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        • #5
          Backer I presume is because, when screwing to secure the 1/8 stack, its almost impossible for the screws to grip the last piece. Even with 1/4 pieces it can be difficult. When you back the screws out flush, the last piece will be wobbling around, and obviously you can't let that happen.
          I screw my stacks also [I never thought I'd say that!] ... So I for one agree with concept of a 1/4 sacrificial backer - not to mention, the 1/4 piece itself will be a legit cut, just thicker than the rest.
          I stack cut 1/8 often, another method, without having to use a backer, is to screw a bit past the last board, back it out as much as you can while still maintaining a good grip, then just grind off the tip of the screws with a dremel, flush with the boards.

          I have tried double stick taping stacks, and have found its not worth the effort to pry them apart, and risk damaging delicate cuts.
          As far as blades, I grab whatever is handy, I doubt if I could even tell the difference of one blade from another, besides spirals. You'd want to jack up speed to the max, and make doubly sure the blade is nice and tight.
          Last edited by Xray; 12-05-2011, 02:46 AM.

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          • #6
            I use my brad nailer on a metal surface so the brad points are clinced if they go through the stack. I think 4 is the optimum number as more than that slow you down.

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            • #7
              I use a brad nailer also but if the brads re too long, I use a little drop of glue from my glue gun, works very well.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the input. One of my scroll saw books suggested using a 1/4" backer as one way to secure the pieces while stack cutting, so I thought I'd try that. It sounds like trying something else (using brads, tape, etc.) would be a better idea in terms of having less material to cut, though, so I'll try one of those.

                Thanks again!

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                • #9
                  Let us know how it goes.
                  "Still Montana Mike"

                  "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
                  Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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                  • #10
                    I don't use screws, Used to use brads and I have the scratches on my table to prove it. What I now use is Round Toothpicks. They hold as good as anything and they do not leave any marks on the table. And you don''t have a heart attack if you should run into one of them with the saw blade. Don't ask how I know. Just drill a hole just a hair larger than the toothpick, so you have room for the glue to hold. Wait a few minutes and sand of the protruding wood and go to it. Good luck
                    Chuck D


                    When a work lifts your spirits and inspires bold and noble thoughts in you, do not look for any other standard to judge by: the work is good, the product of a master craftsman.
                    Jean De La Bruyere...

                    l
                    Hegner 18, Delta p-20, Griz 14 inch Band saw

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                    • #11
                      As far as what blade, I usually let the pattern dictate that. If it is intricate and detailed, I tend to use the smallest blade I can and if I have to, will cut fewer layers in my stack. If the pattern is relatively simple, I use the biggest blade I can easily turn in the piece.

                      For holding the stack together, I've been using hot glue on the edges of the blanks, especially if the edges of the blanks aren't part of the finished piece.
                      Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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                      • #12
                        The project went well. I actually used hot glue in each corner, and that held the 4 pieces very well. I did see that there were some fuzzies here and there when I was done. The bottom had them, but also some of the inside pieces. Afterward I read that can happen with using hot glue because there's a very slight space between the layers. Next time I might use a thin backer and use brads or staples (though it sounds like they can also have issues), as well as experiment with different blades.

                        Thanks again for the helpful advice!

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                        • #13
                          I also use a few spots of hot glue to make all my stacks. As to blade size I would use a #5 or #7 reverse tooth.
                          Scott
                          Creator of fine designer sawdust.

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